Tag Archives: WICHE

Weekend News: HEA (Higher Ed Act) and the ‘Common Core’

States are ensnared in the alignment of education and workforce.
States are ensnared in the alignment of education and workforce.

Greetings, Warriors! What’s the latest on the re-authorization efforts concerning the Higher Education Act, but HOW is the “Common Core” involved? The quick answer is “Career Technical Education”. (what I’ve proven to be the ‘adult version of the K-12 “Common Core Standards”). Another short answer is the ” Initiative behind the entire alignment of education.”

What is Congress up to concerning the education/workforce? We’ve seen what they’ve highlighted so far in the “Student Success Act” and the “Every Child Achieves Act”.  The HEA hasn’t been talked about much lately, that’s true. However, the CCSS Machine (my reference to the entity that involves and surrounds the “Common Core State Standards”), has plenty of plans.

The above image is from Oregon. Does your state have a similar ‘track’ for the aligned “K to Career”? Here’s one from California that is specifically for higher education.
ictpath

From Indiana:
inworked

 

From the U.S. House of Representatives:

NC Representative, Virginia Foxx said this back in March, ” In recent years, as the postsecondary student population has changed, many institutions have developed new approaches to delivering higher education, including competency-based curriculums and online classes. The federal government should make every effort to support these innovations, as they have enabled more Americans to earn a degree or certificate faster, with less cost, and without additional disruption to their daily lives.” She then states the following a bit later on, “these pillars will translate into meaningful federal reforms that reflect the evolving needs of students and the workforce.”
To see her entire statement, visit: http://edworkforce.house.gov/newsroom/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=398559

From the entire U.S. House of Representative’s Education and Workforce Committee’s March 2014 Budget and Fiscal Views for 2015, “In critical areas such as early learning, workforce development, and higher education, the Obama administration’s latest budget proposal aims to make an existing maze of programs even more costly and confusing. Spending more money on broken programs will not provide the support our most vulnerable children, workers, and families desperately need. Education and workforce policies are vital to the success of our country and the future prosperity of our citizens. We all want to ensure students receive a quality education and workers acquire the skills necessary to compete in today’s workforce. To achieve these goals, we must abandon the status quo and enact meaningful reforms that lay the groundwork for a stronger, more prosperous nation – without piling more debt on future generations. Throughout the first session of the 113th Congress, the House Education and the Workforce Committee successfully advanced responsible proposals to revamp the nation’s job training system, raise the bar on K-12 education, promote workplace flexibility, and strengthen higher education.

What follows in the rest of the Budget for Fiscal Year 2015, is simply astounding in its support for the “Student Success Act”. As we witnessed, much evidence has been produced to show just HOW embedded the HR5 (Student Success Act) is with the ‘workforce’ agenda which BEGINS in the K-12 portion AND extends to Higher Education! Read the document for yourselves, Edworkforcebudget

From July 2015, a  press release from the Education and the Workforce Committee, headed up by Rep. John Kline, shared the following,  From Rep. Kline, “There is a lot of work to do in the coming months, and I am confident we will be able to craft a bicameral education bill that reduces the federal role, restores local control, and empowers parents and education leaders.” From Sen. Lamar Alexander, “Fifty million children and 3.5 million teachers deserve to get a result, and we should be able to achieve that this fall.” Also speaking up, were Sen. Patty Murray and Rep. Bobby Scott. Murray’s comments included this, “As we head toward conference, I look forward to continuing to improve the final bill to make sure all students have access to a good education.” Scott shared this, ” I stand committed to producing a bipartisan bill that eliminates resource inequities and effectively addresses achievement gaps.” To see the rest of the press release gloating about the greatness of BOTH the HR5 and the S1177, http://edworkforce.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=399220

From the U. S. Senate’s HELP Committee:

HELP is short for “Health, Education, Labor, and, Pensions. This is the committee that’s comparable to the House’s Education/Workforce one. Here’s an excerpt from their homepage on the website, “The HELP Committee is ensuring our country’s workforce is prepared to meet the challenges of the 21st Century through a lifetime of learning for our citizens. We have jurisdiction over various issues related to education and workforce development, including Head Start, the No Child Left Behind Act, Higher Education, the Arts and Humanities, Student Financial Assistance, Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), Job and Vocational Training and the Workforce Investment Act.”

At a July 2015 hearing concerning re-authorizing the HEA, members of the HELP heard from the Lumina Foundation, The Higher Learning Commission, and others.
To see the entire archived hearing, visit: http://www.help.senate.gov/hearings/reauthorizing-the-higher-education-act-exploring-barriers-and-opportunities-within-innovation


Tied to HELP:

Lumina is KNEE DEEP in the CCSS Machine! Here’s the link to my June 2015 article where I exposed Sen. Alexander’s views on the upcoming re-authorization of HEA in a conference featuring Lumina, Gates Foundation, and the National Journal‘s sponsorship. https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/11/tech-thursday-more-alexander-hea-and-the-next-america/
Wait, there’s more proof! Here’s my article where I shared how the Southern Regional Education Board (SREB) is producing research in support of MORE CCSS alignment between K-12 and post-secondary institutions. Lumina Foundation is among the pro CCSS groups FUNDING the SREB. This article will also give you the other regional education boards as well as other groups helping fund a continued bridge from one educational system to another. See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/25/sic-em-saturday-using-community-colleges-for-more-core/
Lumina also has ‘profiled’ higher education degrees. See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/22/wybi-ccss-supporter-profiling-higher-ed-degrees/ Embedded in this article is the Lumina Foundation statement for alignment of K-12 to Higher Education.

Why so much information on Lumina? During the Senate’s HELP hearing, the president of the Foundation spoke about the 3 most important things to be included in the re-authorization of the HEA. The #1 priority? Building (or redesigning) clear pathways to careers! It’s also important because the president also uses Western Governors University as the most consistent example of higher education CBE (Competency Based Education). I shared with you back in March 2015, how WGU (Western Governors University) is part of the CCSS Machine. See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/13/fom-achieving-cc-aligned-competencies/ The Lumina Foundation’s president also shared this fact, “In fact, more than 30 institutions have formed a nationwide network – the Competency-Based Education Network, or C-BEN – to keep the momentum going. These models are meeting students where they are, recognizing the learning that they’ve already obtained – whether in classrooms, on the job, in the military or through life experience.” You’ll need to see the other things this leader testified about. He includes Starbucks and Arizona State University. Both are pro Common Core/Career Tech Education. See: http://www.help.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Merisotis.pdf

As far as the Higher Learning Commission, (HLC) and it’s devotion to Common Core/Career Technical Education? We’ll get there in a minute or so. First, though, the HLC is one of 6 regional accreditation organizations spread throughout the USA. Nineteen states are served by the HLC. To see which ones, https://www.hlcommission.org/About-the-Commission/about-hlc.html

Here’s a document where the HLC has an Illinois post-secondary school’s Career Tech Education alignment. The document is one of the HLC’s action projects. See: HLC CTE project
HLC is also the group accrediting a U.S. Army school where Common Core is taught. See:
http://usacac.army.mil/organizations/cace/cgsc/achievement (one of the explanations given for this? “Natural career progression”. (In case you missed it, the U.S. Army has issued a fully supportive CCSS statement. See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/16/tech-thursday-common-core-military-special/)

Related to the HLC is CHEA (Council for Higher Education Accreditation). I exposed how tied to the CCSS/CTE they were back in April 2015. See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/14/ftf-chea-cte-ccss-and-america/

C-BEN:

Access to their website: http://www.cbenetwork.org/
Lumina
is a supporting member of this network. Public Agenda is, too. Public Agenda is known for all kinds of policy reform. Here’s an excerpt about them. “Since 1975, Public Agenda has helped foster progress on K-12 and higher education reform, health care, federal and local budgets, energy and immigration.”

From C-BEN’s resource library, a study by WICHE (Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education). WICHE‘s been awarded a slew of grants for CCSS/CTE work from the Gates Foundation. See: http://www.gatesfoundation.org/How-We-Work/Quick-Links/Grants-Database#q/k=WICHE
New America Foundation
is also among those in the Resources section of C-BEN. How is New America tied to Congress and/or the CCSS Machine? See my two part article set:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/10/wybi-sen-alexander-the-hea-and-next-america/
AND https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/11/tech-thursday-more-alexander-hea-and-the-next-america/

To access the C-BEN’s resources for supporting outcome based education: http://www.cbenetwork.org/resource-library/

One resource you’ll definitely be interested in is the Lumina Foundation/Gallup, Inc. It’s all about the redesigning of higher education WITH competency based education as THE only way to learn. See: http://www.cbenetwork.org/sites/457/uploaded/files/Americas_Call_for_Higher_Education_Redesign.pdf

Closing:

Expect more Competency based education in higher education and the re-authorizing of the Act. Expect MORE CCSS Machine rhetoric for Career Technical versions of the Standards. Expect to see Sen. Lamar Alexander speak in favor of MORE alignment. Lastly, expect this: WE, the opposed to the CCSSI (Common Core State Standards Initiative), WILL NOT STOP FIGHTING!

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Sic’ ‘Em Saturday: Using Community Colleges for More ‘Core’

It’s not new news that community colleges are Common Core aligned via either their ‘dual enrollment’ courses (which serve high school students) or the Career Pathways/Career Clusters tracks. However, I have found a new document that gives 21 ways to make the bonds of the CC even STRONGER.

SREB, Southern Regional Education Board:

“The Southern Regional Education Board works with 16 member states to improve public education at every level, from pre-K through Ph.D. A nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, SREB was created in 1948 by Southern governors and legislatures to advance education and improve the social and economic life of the region. Member states are Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.”

I’ve written about SREB a few times before. so I know how supportive of CCSS they are. Recently, the entity has published a Community College Report. Titled “Community Colleges in the South: Strengthening Readiness and Pathways” The work going into this is the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

As I normally do, I’ll only give you the highlights from the document. You can access the entire document from here to research on your own. What if you live outside of the SREB’s domain? I’ll be sure to show you how to find the Regional Education entity in your area by the time we’re through.

Point #1:
Community colleges are essential to achieving state goals — increasing educational achievement of the population, increasing access and completion, eliminating achievement gaps, closing opportunity gaps, and addressing workforce and economic development objectives. These complex institutions are also flexible, adaptable, affordable, community-based, user friendly and proximate to the state’s population.”

Point #2:
“Community colleges serve students, employers and communities.” (think P3 involvement on hyper-drive)

Point #3:
“SREB’s Community College Commission met several times during 2013 and 2014 to recommend policies and practices to increase students’ college and career readiness through effective community college and K-12 pathways. Composed of community college system leaders, legislators, national experts and others.” Below, are the numbers the Report provided:
SREBcommunitycollege

Point #4:
“In an effort to tighten the connection between state goals and funding, approximately half of the states in the nation are moving to outcomes-based funding. In states such as Ohio, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Mexico, Tennessee and Washington, state support — all or in part — is derived from a funding formula with metrics specifically designed for community colleges. Program designs in most states would reward institutions on a range of measures, including rewards for students who reach momentum points such as successful completion of a specified number of credits, transfers, success with underserved populations and at-risk students, completion of STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) programs, as well as completion of certificates and degrees. Programs with higher rates of completion receive incentive funding for contributing to a state’s educational attainment goal. Although now used widely, outcomes-based funding is still controversial…”

Point #5:
Addressing the admittance policies that could be changed, “The urgency to redesign both placement and developmental education is fueled recently by the impending, new college- and career-readiness standards and associated assessments being implemented by most states. These nationwide standards and assessments are more rigorous, especially with respect to reading and writing, and the more demanding assessments most likely will publicly reveal a much more severe readiness problem. To these points, the recent National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 12th grade achievement-level results for literacy and math — which apply performance expectations empirically linked to college success and to the new common readiness standards — show that only 38 percent of students perform at or above the Proficient level in reading, and 26 percent perform at the Proficient level in math. Hence, these placement and remedial challenges must be addressed so that colleges and students come closer to meeting the postsecondary completion goals set by most states…” 

Point #6:
“….emphases in the emerging new common college readiness standards, there is a growing call to address the fundamental and logical importance of students being able to read with comprehension moderately complex texts across a variety of content areas.”

Point #7:

Regarding math readiness, “In fact, numerous examples in postsecondary education (public and independent) have resolved this issue by requiring math other than college algebra (or precalculus) as a free-standing degree requirement. For non-STEM majors, many institutions accept, for degree credit, math courses such as finite math, introductory statistics, contemporary math and quantitative reasoning. It is thought that the logical and critical reasoning and thinking skills required for a degree — for future careers and perhaps for successful study in other areas of the curriculum — can be nurtured through rigorous engagement in these courses. The four major math associations (American Mathematical Society, American Statistical Association, Mathematical Association of America, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) will issue recommendations this year that college algebra no longer be a general education course requirement.” Not much further down the page the discussion of which math areas would be considered as alternatives, “The construction and implementation of these new approaches to developmental education centering on these courses is proceeding through the work of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s Quantway and Statway projects and the New Mathways Project from the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas.”

Point #8:
“…placement and readiness evaluation tend to identify and assess literacy skills based on students’ abilities to read texts of moderate- to lower-level complexity, within a narrow range of academic disciplines. Too often, these evaluations do not challenge students’ abilities to read and understand academic or technical texts, or to analyze and explain their meaning in writing. This ability to read more complex text in many subjects is critical to students’ abilities to succeed in postsecondary education. For example, the most commonly used placement tests, Accuplacer and Compass, use relatively simple texts and writing prompts. The lack of challenging literacy readiness standards and assessments explain why math skills have been viewed as the area which most contributes to the readiness problem.” Not too far down the page, “Moreover, many state K-12 systems have adopted new literacy standards, such as the Common Core State Standards and others, that are based on the deep and effective reading of complex information texts across different disciplines and the ability to engage in expository writing that parallels the higher text complexity.”

Point #9:
“Public schools need the direct support of community colleges to meet the immense readiness challenge. Community colleges need to lead in making more students ready for postsecondary education, especially in supporting systematic high school efforts to raise achievement in literacy and math skills. Community colleges need to engage in the following activities jointly with local public schools:  *Send specific, concrete messages about the literacy and math readiness skills needed.  *Support the need for junior-year readiness assessments based on specific readiness skills and standards*Support the provision and required enrollment of students in 12th grade bridge or transition courses based on the literacy and math readiness skills. These courses should be taken by students assessed as not ready by the junior-year assessments and provide a way to move developmental education from the community colleges to K-12.  *Provide concrete, actual examples of first-year community college course work to high schools. SREB will use its convening and advocacy capacity to bring together groups of states to address these recommendations; in light of the controversial nature of the recommendations…”
Point #10:
“One of the most underutilized strategies to support student degree completion is the emphasis on a well-defined, rather narrow pathway that students should adhere to in order to complete an associate or bachelor’s degree in a timely manner.” Not long after you read this, you’ll read this, “A structured guided pathway is an academic program map where faculty have sequenced the courses and identified well-defined learning outcomes. Pathways imply structure and guidance toward timely completion and next steps along the path. Structure and guidance are both important and costly. They include adequate and appropriate advising that focuses on careers and programs, rather than courses, and keeps students on track, requiring them to have a plan and declare a major early. Pathways help students build credit toward a certificate or skill base, should they leave the institution before completing a certificate or degree. They provide the opportunity to take accelerated courses such as dual enrollment and Advanced Placement.” Wait, there’s this as well, “While the definition of a structured or guided pathway may vary somewhat, policy-makers, educators and business leaders agree that postsecondary programs of study that lead to certificates and associate degrees must be better aligned with local, regional, and state workforce needs. Additionally, the programs and courses should be regularly evaluated against workforce needs.”

There is SO much more you need to read in this report! Access it: CommCollegeCom_2015
Of interest: The SREB upcoming College/Career Readiness Conference! Set for July 2015 in Atlanta. (see: http://www.sreb.org/page/1615/CCSSConference.html)
Who funds SREB? Here’s the list of CCSS funders we’ve seen so many times before:
*Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
*Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
*Consolidated Management Resources
*Lamar Plunkett Family
*Lumina Foundation
*National Board of Professional Teaching Standards
*National Research Center for Career and Technical Education, University of Louisville
*National Institutes of Health
*National Science Foundation
*The Pearson Foundation
*U.S. Department of Education

Want to learn more about SREB’s preK-PhD work? http://www.sreb.org/page/1068/about_SREB.html

Other regional Education Boards:
WICHE, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education: http://www.wiche.edu/
MSC, Multi-State Collaborative: http://www.sheeo.org/projects/msc-multi-state-collaborative-advance-learning-outcomes-assessment#What
NEBHE, New England Board of Higher Education: http://www.nebhe.org/
MHEC, Midwestern Higher Education Compact: http://www.mhec.org/
Consortium of State and Regional Education Research Associations: http://www.srera.org/
American Educational Research Association: http://www.aera.net/

FTF Tuesday: Meet SHEEO

We all love a great discovery, don’t we? Especially in finding out about how far and wide the net is cast across our nation when it comes to Common Core. Today, you won’t be disappointed. We’re going to be finding out about SHEEO, The States Higher Education Executive Officers Organization. They are regular partners with the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers) and the U.S. Dept. of Education. We know so much already about the USDofEd, CCSSO, we’ll be homing in on this ‘new’ organization.

SHEEO, partner of The CCSSO and others:

(www.sheeo.org) According to the website the organization has been around since 1954. Among its purposes, it serves the member states via their higher educational systems, helping shape education policies, and being a liaison between states and the federal government. Currently, there are 55 members from many different states and Puerto Rico. The Executive President is the Executive Director for the Higher Education System in Alabama, Gregory Fitch. Be sure to discover who represents your state. My SHEEO representative is the President of the University of North Carolina, Thomas Ross. We have 17 campuses across our state. As a parent of a student at one of the UNC member schools, I’m not surprised to discover the link, but it is proof, that none of us are ‘safe’ from the overreach of CCSS. (Common Core State Standards)
*Note: You’ll want to especially look at the SHEEO members from the states which didn’t ‘adopt’ the Common Core, like Alaska or Texas. Why? Because, as I’ve written extensively about, the College and Career Readiness, the Adult Common Core will be in post secondary (aka higher education) institutions. This encompasses community colleges and on-line learning as well.

Partners of SHEEO include the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers), the College and Career Readiness Project, and the National Center for Educational Statistics. There are other partners you’ll want to investigate as well.

Current Projects:

1) College and Career Readiness Partnership (CCRP). Here’s an excerpt that you MUST read and share, “In December 2010, three national education leadership associations—the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), and the State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO)—joined in a College and Career Readiness Partnership (CCRP) to promote broad implementation of new Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in mathematics and English Language Arts (ELA). Through its combined network of leaders, the CCRP works collaboratively to address those issues that reside at the intersection of the PK-12 and higher education systems. Primarily, this includes addressing what is needed for successful utilization of the CCSS and common assessments of student achievement, both to improve college readiness in PK-12 and to make effective use of these assessments for placement and other decisions in postsecondary education.”    In June 2011, the CCRP staff worked with the Steering Committee to select a first Cohort of seven states—Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Oregon, Tennessee, Wisconsin—to work closely with the Partnership through State Leadership Teams on the statewide goal of effective, cross-sector, Common Core implementation.” The following excerpt is from the AASCU’s announcement, “The Phase II timeline is October 2012 – December 2013. Missouri, Oregon, Wisconsin will continue as Cohort 1 of Phase II and five new states will be invited to join as Cohort 2 for Phase II.” According to the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Lumina Foundation and the Hewlett Foundation fund the entire Project. Both are well known CCSS supporters.  This organization has its own set of CCR initiatives going. If you can access a copy of their published “Serving America’s Future: Increasing College Readiness”, you can find out more. Unlike the other files I share on Tuesdays, this one isn’t free. In fact it is $30.00. You can access for free the “Executive Summary” of the detailed report,     http://www.aascu.org/CollegeReadiness/ExecutiveSummary/   

*Note: While at the AASCU website, be sure to check out their member states, schools. Be sure to look at the territories and international locations included.

To find out more about the CCRP, Defining_College_Career_Readiness Be sure to remember, states which do not ‘adopt’ CCSS, do indeed have ties to this project. For example, Texas has “Project Share”. Also, research the paper’s author. You’ll be glad you did.

Somewhat related: This excerpt is from 2009, that I found on-line, “There is a new effort coming under way which I will be involved with and documenting closely to set data standards in the country. This is being done in partnership between USED, CCSSO, SHEEO”   

To read the rest of the 2009 information,  ( http://thejackl.org/tag/sif-pesc-duncan-used-gates-ccsso-sheeo/)

2) MSC, Multi State Collaborative to Advance Learning Outcomes Assessment. “The MSC is designed to produce valid data summarizing faculty judgments of students’ own work, and also seeks to aggregate results in a way that allows for benchmarking across institutions and states. The primary goal of the initiative is to provide assessment data that will allow faculty and institution leaders to assess—and improve—the levels of student achievement on a set of cross-cutting outcomes important for all disciplines. With the active support of the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association (SHEEO) and the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), nine states—Connecticut, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Utah—agreed to collaborate in the development and pilot testing of a different model for learning outcomes assessment—a model that is rooted in campus/system collaboration, in authentic student work, and in faculty curriculum development and teaching activity. The project builds on efforts in Massachusetts (as part of its Vision Project) and builds on the AAC&U LEAP initiative through which it developed a common set of rubrics—VALUE Rubrics—to assess the LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes.” Below is a graphic you’ll want to notice in detail, so click to enlarge it.

Student data, shared with Labor.
Student data, shared with Labor.

To check our your state’s data sharing: http://www.sheeo.org/resources/publications/strong-foundations-state-state-postsecondary-data-systems-2012-update-data

3) Lumina, SHEEO and your state’s funding:

This project is known as “Moving the Needle”. “The State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO) association supports the Lumina Foundation’s push to reach a 60% college attainment rate in the United States by moving from an access agenda to a focus on both access and success. As the membership organization for the state-level governing and coordinating boards of higher education, SHEEO is focused on state-level policy and the role(s) the states can play to reach the goals of the completion agenda. As such, SHEEO is uniquely positioned to understand and consider the varying state contexts that our members operate within and use this knowledge to evaluate state policy recommendations related to college affordability.”

To read more about this,  Moving_the_Needle_041414

4) Common Education Data Standards (CEDS), this project works with AIR (Association for Institutional Research), WICHE (Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education) which is funded by the Gates Foundation, and the Postsecondary Electronic Standards Council. There are other partners as well, so be sure to check them out. CEDS began in 2009. To learn more about just what is ‘common’ and what isn’t, http://www.airweb.org/EducationAndEvents/IPEDSTraining/AdditionalResources/Pages/CEDS.aspx

From the PESC (Postsecondary Electronic Standards Council), this is a list of which organizations are involved in CEDS:

The CEDS User Group participants include representatives from:

  • AcademyOne
  • ACT
  • AEM Corporation
  • Brandon University
  • California School Information Service (CSIS)
  • Choice P20 Solutions
  • College Board
  • College Source
  • Colorado Community College System
  • Ed-Fi
  • Ellucian
  • eScholar
  • Florida International University
  • Georgetown University
  • Hobsons
  • IBM
  • Jenzabar
  • McGraw-Hill
  • Michigan Department of Education
  • National Association of Student Loan Administrators (NASLA)
  • National Student Clearinghouse
  • Naviance
  • North Dakota Department of Education
  • Ontario Universities’ Application Centre (OUAC)
  • Oracle
  • Parchment
  • Perceptive Software
  • QIP
  • Questionmark
  • Rapid Insight
  • RTI
  • SCRIP-SAFE International
  • SIF Association
  • State Education Technology Directors Association (SETDA)
  • State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO)
  • Triadvocates
  • Turning Technologies
  • USA Funds
  • US Department of Education, Office of Under Secretary

The current Co-Chairs of the CEDS User Group are:

  • Hans L’Orange, Vice President for Research and Information Resources, SHEEO
  • *Tony Romano, Director of Information Technology, National Student Clearinghouse

To see even more about student data collection: http://www.pesc.org/interior.php?page_id=208 When you visit this page, be sure to notice the banners that flash up at the top. Don’t miss the one about collaborating for the students greater good.

mullercore