Tag Archives: UT

State Digital Education

knewtondigital

Anti CCSS Warriors, if you have seen my last two articles, then you know the ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) has mandates for digital education embedded, a massive and invasive data collection study in the works and more.
But what about the digital education push from your state’s level?In case you haven’t read the articles, please note both are very detailed, so be sure you take your time reading them. Today’s is also jam packed, but it it imperative we read and share!

Thursday’s Article: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2016/02/04/essa-and-digital-overload/
This Past Weekend’s Article: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2016/02/05/weekend-news-the-ies-and-the-essa/

 

The U.S. Dept. of Ed’s Latest Propaganda:

In preparing for this article, I stumbled upon the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s latest Twitter video. It fits right into today’s question concerning the state levels for digital education. What a slick sales pitch for College/Career Readiness AND digital learning!
See:

https://amp.twimg.com/v/dcb95af5-160a-47b5-a48a-5a293dfe2e18

Now that you have watched the video, look at this screen shot (also from the Knewton Presentation seen above).
facilitatedigitalIf you would like to see the entire Knewton Presentation, see:
https://www.knewton.com/infographics/the-state-of-digital-education-infographic/
(*Note: Knewton is hardly anti-CCSS or for that matter, anti-ANYTHING that goes with them.)

See:
1) http://curmudgucation.blogspot.com/2014/03/who-puts-scary-in-pearson-meet-knewton.html

2) Access this YouTube video from my fellow anti CCSS Warrior, Nicole Revels:

So, What’s in Your State?

The video above was specific to an NC meeting. However, look at the information presented, it doesn’t stop at the NC state lines! The data mining, digital education tie is in ALL 50 States! So where do you look to find the amounts of money, people, and legislation allowing all this to happen? How will the newly passed ESSA law (with all its digital education mandates) change all this already in place?

1) State Policy Network (SPN) claims their digital education toolkit is the best available. However, I tend to see their toolkit as a subjective view NOT an objective one. Why? First, look at the toolkit’s main page and you will see an embedded video from KIPP ( a very big CCSS Machine member) See my previously published article: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/18/tech-thursday-the-latest-faux-pas-in-education-workforce/
Then, check out the Gates Foundation Grant Database, where KIPP has been generously awarded money for alignment to all things CCSS: http://www.gatesfoundation.org/How-We-Work/Quick-Links/Grants-Database#q/k=KIPP
The KIPP connection is but one clue the SPN Toolkit is subjective. There is more:
See: http://nonprofitquarterly.org/2013/11/14/corporate-money-in-network-of-right-wing-state-policy-think-tanks/

There are 5 goals the SPN states as to WHY digital education is so vital today. You can see the excerpt, “Evaluate students (based on what they know, not how long they are in a place);
Certify and evaluate teachers (based on how well they teach what they know, not the credentials obtained); Evaluate courses and materials (based on state standards); Provide access (instead of getting in the way); and Pay for all of it (with proper accountability).”
To see the entire Toolkit: http://www.spn.org/digital_education/

2) SETDA and the Friday Institute have a June 2015 report detailing the 50 States and Digital Education. Before we look at it, however, consider that BOTH are also Pro-CCSS/CCR/CTE (Common Core State Standards, College and Career Readiness, Career Tech Education) See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/05/15/fom-sbac-and-parcc-revisited/
Then: http://ladyliberty1885.com/2015/08/30/possibly-the-most-arrogant-and-insulting-common-core-article-ive-seen-in-a-while/

According the the 2015 Report, there are 5 States heralded as leaders in digital education:
Alabama, North Carolina, Utah, Indiana, and Kentucky. There are also 5 main components of digital education every State will have, thanks to ESSA.
5digital
As I have shared with you in past 2 articles detailing the digital mandates in ESSA, the Infrastructure will be one of the biggest clues as to where to look in your State. What are the plans for better internet in your area? Are your service providers upgrading their systems? Has your state recently passed legislation for Rural Education funding? There are other similar questions for you to ask.

To access the June 2015 Report (where just below this screen shot you will see the descriptions of how each of the 5 goals will be obtained): DigitalLearningExemplars_June2015

As an example of legislation passed, here in NC, to support digital learning, read this excerpt from the Report, “State Law 2013-12 requires the North Carolina
Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) to assist districts in the transition from textbooks to digital materials by 2017. These materials must be effective for all learners and align with the curriculum and standards. Such a law promotes progress toward some level of digital learning statewide.” What if you don’t live in one of the 5 States mentioned as leaders? The Report will also detail all the other States and where they are in the path of mass alignment.

Since AL is considered to be the #1 leader in the shift to digital education, see this article about the Governor pushing for more fiber optic connections throughout the State:
http://www.centerdigitaled.com/k-12/Alabama-Governor-Pushes-Fiber-Optic-Cables-for-Schools.html

If you would like to see how SETDA is modernizing the E-rate in your State, see:
http://www.setda.org/priorities/equity-of-access/e-rate-modernization/

So Where in ESSA are the Libraries?

Based on the ESSA Final Conference Report (I shared the document with you in the Thursday article mentioned above), here are page numbers concerning digital education and libraries:
1) Page 138, school libraries and their programs to be updated to digital
2) Page 323, school libraries and their programs must offer digital courses to all school leaders
3) Page 343, school libraries and their programs to lead all school employees in digitally led courses as part of ‘safe schools’
4) Page 384, possible U.S. Dept. of Ed Secretary awarded grants for school libraries and digital led programming
5) 387, all libraries (school or public) are included, with museums, non-profits, and post-secondary educational instututions
6) Page 515, after school programs via extended public library services/hours
7) Page 1,000, authorizes the LSTA (Library Services and Technology Act) grant money to be used for technology upgrades and/or purchases for digital education for all
8) Page 1,037, embeds the Museum and Library Services Act, MLSA

 

 Related Information:

Kipp has partnered with several post-secondary institutions in America to continue the CCSS Machine’s alignment. See:
http://www.kipp.org/our-approach/kipp-through-college/college-partnerships

The Gates Foundation-friendly Education Week has an article you will need to access as well. It deals with the E-rate legislation (a federal level law which impacts all 50 States) and its role in digital education. See: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2015/10/e-rate_application_toolkit.html
In contrast, I wrote an anti CCSS Warrior article about the E-rate legislation back in 2014 for Prevent Common Core’s website. See: http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1223

The Federal Learning Registry is slam full of massive data mining via digital education.
See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/12/monday-musings-assessments-data-mining/

SETDA’s role in ridding the world of printed textbooks:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/sic-em-saturday-creatively-turning-the-usa-common/

For LSTA (Library Services and Technology Act) see my previously published article:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/monday-musings-hitting-the-books/

For how much MLSA (Museum and Library Services Act) grant money your State has been awarded, see:
https://www.imls.gov/grants/grants-states


 

Tech Thursday: CTE, CCSS, and Special Needs in Post Secondary Education

Back in December 2014, I first wrote about Common Core, Career and Technical Education and its impact on the Special Needs students. What’s the latest for this population group in Post-Secondary education? Let’s find out in today’s article. Below is the link to the 2014 article:

https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/tech-thursday-career-techcommon-core-and-alternative-education/

Also related to this is the CCSS alignment of IEPs: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/rmt-ccsss-present-to-special-needs/

Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.
Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.

An Education Webinar from June 30th:

Just a couple of days ago, the Gates Foundation backed “Education Week” hosted a free educational webinar about post secondary life for those with special needs. The following information is from links suggested as credible resources during the webinar. Credible for us, the anti CCSS Warriors, means we can use the resources to know where to look to access the CCSS Machine’s grasp for our students with special needs.

Education Week’s article, “Advocates Hope Common Core Will Rub Off” shares this criticism that not enough transitional planning is going on for those with special needs shifting from high school to post secondary education. While that may or may not be true, it’s the source EW used which is skewed towards CCSS/CTE (AIR, American Institutes of Research) offering the criticism. “”Many plans lack depth, breadth, and personalization; have low expectations for students with disabilities; do not include plans for postsecondary education; and do not map out how the K–12 education system should connect to other systems, such as postsecondary, vocational rehabilitation, workforce training, or independent services,” says a 2013 report from the American Institutes for Research. “As a result, many students with disabilities leave high school with amorphous and generic plans that fail to address their individual circumstances or interests.” To access the entire article: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/04/advocates-hope-common-core-will-rub-off.html?intc=EW-DPCT15-TOC

From that 2013 AIR Report (be sure to click on the image to enlarge it):

AIRneeds

To access the 2013 AIR Report: Improving College and Career Readiness for Students with Disabilities

NASDSE, the National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Inc.:

This group based in VA, is supporting the ‘Every Child Achieves Act’ (aka: HR5 as the re-authorization of the NCLB law which in turn gave us Race to the Top and Common Core). Here’s an excerpt from their letter of support to Sen. Lamar Alexander, “NASDSE commends you for including in your bill language that only allows up to one percent of all students – those who have the most significant cognitive disabilities – to take an alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards. This cap is critical to ensuring that students with disabilities will remain on track to graduate from high school prepared for postsecondary education and/or a career. We therefore urge that you oppose any efforts during the bill’s markup that would raise or eliminate this cap.” You can read the entire letter, http://www.nasdse.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=hLXguhdRtoM%3d&tabid=36

Also available from the NASDSE, is a 2004 data collection document which spells out what ADDITIONAL data is collected on each student with special needs. You can read it: SpecNeedsDataCollect

NASDSE has been around since 1938, but its most recent set of goals includes more post secondary success for the students served. Here’s a short paragraph you may find interesting, “The continued collaboration with our key partners, including the National Association of State Title I Directors and the Council of Administrators of Special Education brings us closer to common language in serving and improving outcomes for all students and remains a priority for NASDSE, as is collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs, in order to provide input regarding implementation of the State Systemic Improvement Plans,  Results Driven Accountability and the role of the National Center for Systemic Improvement (NCSI) in providing direct support to our members.”

The Board of Directors are all from various states across America and their Public Instruction departments. AZ, VA, MT, NH, UT, CA, GA, and SD. See: http://www.nasdse.org/AboutNASDSE/BoardofDirectors/tabid/406/Default.aspx (*NOTE; from here you can explore more about the organization via the left hand menu)

If you’re curious about the funding each state receives for educating special needs students, NASDSE and AIR (as in the group above) partnered together back in 2010 and published a report about this topic. See: NASDSEAIR

To find out all the NASDSE’s corporate sponsors and other groups involved: http://www.nasdse.org/ResourceLinks/tabid/59/Default.aspx

Pacer’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment, http://www.pacer.org/transition/:

From their website, “Founded in 1977, PACER Center was created by parents of children and youth with disabilities to help other parents and families facing similar challenges. PACER Center enhances the quality of life and expands opportunities for children, youth, and young adults with all disabilities and their families so each person can reach his or her highest potential. PACER operates on the principles of parents helping parents, supporting families, promoting a safe environment for all children, and working in collaboration with others.” It is a non profit organization based in MN. It is funded by the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Office for Special Education Programs (*NOTE: you can find this fact at the bottom of every page on the website highlighted in blue)

From the Pacer’s 2014 published resources, a ‘new’ way to look at career paths for those students ready to go from high school to post secondary education. Here’s an interesting couple of paragraphs to read. When reading, consider the context of Career Pathways and/or Career and Technical Education (which are CCSS aligned), “To be able to acquire these skills and effectively change jobs, and plan and manage multiple careers over one’s life time, career development skills are important. The process by which youth get to know their strengths and interests, learn how different jobs connect with those interests, and build these career planning and management skills is called career development.” 

“By helping to support youth in making important informed decisions about their future, parents and other caring adults can contribute a great deal to their children’s post-high school success. For youth with disabilities in particular, families often play the very important roles of setting high expectations for youth’s future employment, and of advocating for opportunities for them to identify their strengths and interests and to explore career options. Families who learn about and begin the career development process with their youth early will be better prepared to support them in choosing and building a bright future. “Family” here is defined broadly as adults and children related biologically, emotionally, or legally, including single parents, blended families, unrelated individuals living cooperatively, and partnered couples who live with biological, adopted, and foster children.” The entire document was found on a linked website from the Pacer’s website. The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability (NCWD). To read the NCWD’s entire document, http://www.ncwd-youth.info/node/1463 (*NOTE: The NCWD is part of the Institute for Educational Leadership which is a supported by a grant from the U.S. Dept. of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, ODEP; you can find this information at the bottom of the page when you access the article mentioned directly above. It’s highlighted in blue.)
“Think College!”, http://www.thinkcollege.net/:

From their website, you can find out that  “Think College is a project of the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The Think College initiatives are funded by grants from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, the Office of Special Education Programs, and the Office of Postsecondary Education.”

For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports
For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports

If you’d like to see the CCSS tie between the Standards and Boston College, http://frontrow.bc.edu/program/braun/

For more proof of BC’s CCSS stance:

BostonCollegeccss

Closing:

If you need more evidence of how intrusive the CCSS Machine is being in regard to our families and students with special needs, please let me know. If you have such evidence or wish to provide a real life account of your family’s saga with Career and Tech Education or Common Core, please let me know.

RMT: Connected to the Core?

AdvancED leading NC straight to more CCSS.
AdvancED leading NC straight to more CCSS.

Today’s “Riddle Me This” is all about a new effort accredited by AdvancED (so CCSS friendly it’s downright shameful) and growing in NC. We’ll also delve into which other states are involved.

The Context:

Many of us who are fighting CCSS, have already been able to connect the dots between AdvancED and CCSS. However, I know many of us may need a refresher OR may be so new to fighting CCSS, they haven’t made the connection. To help you establish what AdvancED does, here’s an excerpt from my guest post I wrote on LadyLiberty1185’s blog in mid 2014: AdvancEd is an online company dedicated to helping your school be the best. Just look at their Common Core Standards page. My personal ‘favorite’ is the reinvention of the report card into digital badges. Read it for yourself. Note: the author is from NASA — as in the guys who went to the moon.” Access the report:  http://www.advanc-ed.org/source/reinventing-report-card
If you’d like to read the entire article on Lady’s site, http://ladyliberty1885.com/2014/07/07/guest-post-common-core-in-charters-private-homeschools/

Here’s what AdvancED has to say about themselves: “AdvancED is the largest community of education professionals in the world. We are a non-profit, non-partisan organization that conducts rigorous, on-site external reviews of PreK-12 schools and school systems to ensure that all learners realize their full potential. While our expertise is grounded in more than a hundred years of work in school accreditation, AdvancED is far from a typical accrediting agency. Our goal isn’t to certify that schools are good enough. Rather, our commitment is to help schools improve.”

What you need to know about AdvancED:
1) They fully support the re-authorization of ESEA (as in the HR5 federal legislation).

2) To support their position of the re-authorization, their report on ‘Diagnostic Review’ explains how they will use school data to an extreme. Get the report: Diagnostic-Review

3) In AdvancED’s latest Annual Report, the non profit shared many vital details we, as anti CCSS warriors need. FYI, the organization is worth over $16 million dollars and is purposed to reinvested everything into continuing to change education. Get the report: AE-AnnualReport2013-14

4) Partners of AdvancED include quite an extensive list of faith-based schools as well as State Boards of Education. Partners link: http://www.advanc-ed.org/services/partnerships State Boards link: http://www.advanc-ed.org/services/state-departments-education (*Note: among the State Boards is CCSSO, as in the Council of Chief State School Officers–you know, half owner of the copyright to Common Core Standards)

The New Push:

Now that you have that information, here’s how AdvancEd is pushing their CCSS support into NC via a ‘new’ school….

Called “North Carolina Connections Academy” (website: http://www.connectionsacademy.com/north-carolina-virtual-school/home.aspx) How did I discover this new school? I received a colorful flyer in my regular mail. The big banner at the top of the mailer states that the school is a ‘tuition-free virtual public school’. All the in-person, ‘get-to-know-all-about-us’ meetings are held in nearby locations (here in NC). However, the return mailing address gives me a Maryland location. Hhmm….not surprised. Here’s the website address for the home office in MD (it’s called “Connections Education, LLC”): http://www.connectionseducation.com/

Because it's virtual, this school can reach anywhere--any state, country, or school which is willing to sign up.
Because it’s virtual, this school can reach anywhere–any state, country, or school which is willing to sign up.

 

The first clue to CCSS allegiance is ‘public school’. Virtual public schools in NC are still rather new, therefore, not totally understood. Here’s an excerpt from an article by UNC’s WUNC. “The General Assembly required last year that the state create a four-year pilot program for two virtual charter schools. Only two schools applied: North Carolina Virtual Academy, run by K12 Inc.; and Connections Academy, to be managed by Connections Education.” (entire article: http://wunc.org/post/virtual-charter-schools-coming-nc)

The second clue is the curricula publishers list. (Pearson, MacGraw-Hill, and many others) Every page of this “NC” school has Pearson’s logo of “Always Learning” at the bottom.

The third clue: Talent Networks (includes STEM)

The Board of Directors:

It won't take long to research how each of these people are connected to CCSS.
It won’t take long to research how each of these people are connected to CCSS.

“Connections Education” was a 2013 “Best Places to Work” winner. See: http://www.connectionsacademy.com/news/ce-named-among-2013-best-places-to-work

Pearson’s Connection Education is not only in NC, but the following locations:
International Connections Academy, AZ, CA, CO, FL, GA, IA, ID, IN, KS, LA, MA, ME, MI, MN, NM, NV, OH, OK, OR, PA, SC, TX, UT, WI, and WY. Here’s the link to see what the names of the schools are (most are the state’s name followed by “Connections Academy”, however, “Nexus” and a couple of other names are used as smoke screens): http://www.connectionsacademy.com/online-school/availability

The Pearson run entity also offers CTE (Career Tech Ed) courses, so those Career Clusters/Pathways can occur in the virtual student’s life as it does in the students’ lives in the brick and mortar schools. (look under the ‘curriculum’ page for proof).

Of course, with Pearson in charge, you know your student’s information will be data mined all over the globe.
See a related news announcement: http://www.connectionslearning.com/connections-learning/news/advanced-academics-acquisition.aspx

Closing:

While it’s no secret how tied to CCSS North Carolina is, I do wonder if the NC General Assembly did their digging into finding out what organization is behind Connections Academy before they approved the educational experiment with not only our students, but, our tax dollars. If you live in NC, pass this information to your legislator. IF you live in any of the states listed above, share this with your legislators. Hold them accountable! No CCSS in our states MEANS No CCSS, CTE, CCR, or other sly rebrand, rename dreamed up.

Sic’ ‘Em Saturday: “Springboarding” into the CCSS/AP Pool

"Srpingboard" is a product line by "College Board" said to prepare students for Advance Placement classes. Guess, what, Common Core aligned!
“Srpingboard” is a product line by “College Board” said to prepare students for Advance Placement classes. Guess, what, Common Core aligned!

Have you heard of “Springboard”?

According to the ‘College Board’s’ website, the product line is a foundation. The description also goes on to tell you how great it, how it’s been proven, and so on. (http://professionals.collegeboard.com/k-12/prepare/springboard) What’s interesting is that to find out about Springboard, you have to go the site’s ‘K-12 Services’. Oh, gee, thanks College Board, for considering willfully aligning our students to CCSS as a service! Next thing you know, you’ll be telling us there are no sharp rocks in the picture above, as a service!

What the product line does:

Targets 6th-12th graders with customized content full of rigor, performance based assessments and all professional developed. Sounds great, right?  Here’s a link address for a video of one of the schools used as a testing site. There are a total of 22 schools in a select number of states. http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/video_audio/springboard/qcsd-qchs-video.mp4

You jumping in? We did! The ‘water’s fine’!

So far, 8 states have adopted Springboard:  CA, GA, TN, FL, NM, UT, OR, and TX. From what I can gather, member states get free workshops, especially during the first year of a mutli-year implementation process. I picked a state to see just what else is in store for them, here’s Georgia’s Teacher workshop: “introduces the key components of the SpringBoard framework, emphasizing rigorous instruction, alignment to the Common Core, formative and summative assessments, and other challenges facing Georgia educators. Teachers learn how to use SpringBoard’s digital and print components to differentiate instruction, ensuring all students are engaged in education that leads to college and career readiness.” For the school districts: “SpringBoard coaches collaborate with district leaders in partnerships that grow stronger every year. They work together to design and implement a program of professional development that meets the needs of each school and evolves as those needs change.” This is just the first year, the second year is building expertise and covers even more implementation of the standards. The third year is for capacity building, after all, everybody’s gotta jump in at some point.

Learning Walks:
Another partnership Springboard offers the states, is called “Learning Walks“. If you’ve not heard of these they are quite something. While the state I live in hasn’t adopted Springboard, they DO use it in some of the schools. However, the state does use Learning Walks. I’m including the pdf file from one of the public schools: Learning_Walks_Overview

“Using the Learning Walk system (handhelds, laptops, or paper forms), “walkers” collect specific data that provides a series of snapshots of the teaching and learning process. Learning Walks are brief, often lasting no more than four minutes. The focus of a Learning Walk is on student work and teacher responses in the context of teaching and learning. Over time, the observer collects data on five specific components supported by research related to student learning. This information provides the walker with the opportunity to pose questions based on trend data to engage the teacher, PLC team, or entire faculty in thinking about beliefs, goals, practices, and instructional decision making. Promoting reflective practice will result in several benefits for all educators: • building trust in the reflective practice process itself; • inspiring teacher-driven research through the self-reflection focus; • informing dialogue about teaching and learning between the walker and teacher; • expanding capacity for analyzing thoughts, actions, beliefs, and emotions; • enhancing dialogue about teaching and learning within a professional learning community; • fostering self-monitoring of professional growth; and, • creating a school-wide climate of inquiry and research. In the formative performance appraisal process, observers use the Learning Walk model to collect observation data as a basis for posing periodic reflective questions as well as for sharing trend data periodically.” The five focus areas? Curriculum, lessons, students, work, and the quality framework. You’ll be interested to know that the opportunity for EVEN more data collection is available. The goal behind this particular county’s schools?  “All ________ County Public Schools students will graduate having actively mastered the lifelong-learning skills they need to succeed as 21st century learners, workers and citizens.” Of the ‘lifelong competencies, not one was based on specific subjects. they do contain a long, lofty list of character attributes. Collect and organizing data, think critically, be ethical, be healthy, communicate clearly, be civic minded among others.

How ‘Springboard’ is aligned to CCSS:

You will need to enlarge the picture, but it’s worth a 1,000 words.

Currently, English and Math are the two "Springboard" subjects.
Currently, English and Math are the two “Springboard” subjects.

You’ll want to read some of the texts, books, novels used in the program, among them, Fahrenheit 451, Pygmalion and others you will find interesting. Also included is a Socratic seminar (this should be interesting as well, considering only a few days ago I wrote and shared with you the before/after treatment of Socrates/Plato) Here’s the link to see the rest of what’s in store for your students.

http://media.collegeboard.com/digitalServices/pdf/springboard/springboard-publishers-criteria-english-language-arts-146-583.pdf

I can tell you the Springboard Student textbook I have (part of my CCSS evidence collection), is directed to “All About Me”, the changes I’m facing, the changes in my perception, my world, measuring all those changes. If I were you, I’d want to sit in on a class or two with this subject matter.

What you can do:

1) If offered a choice for your student to have another English/Math class, take the non Springboard one. IF there’s no other choice, test the waters..ask to see the teacher’s guide, look at your student’s book. The website for Springboard has samples, so be sure to access those, print them out and take to your school board. Advance Placement courses are all being run by College Board, which means they are under David Coleman’s direction! You may know how the AP U.S. History has been rewritten, there are other courses that will also be rewritten in similar fashion.

2) Inform other families who have students using Springboard! Share this post, resources. Spread the word. Be willing to accompany those conducting “Learning Walks”. Find out how far the data sharing goes. Inform those in charge you will not allow your student to participate. Remember, exercising your rights as an informed parent is making a statement. It is NOT asking permission. You do not need the school’s permission to do what’s best for your student/child.

3) Be a step ahead of your students. Since you may be able to get the reading list (it can’t hurt to ask the teacher), get the book from the library, borrow it from a neighbor, buy it in a store, etc. Use family time to discuss what the actual vernacular is and contrast to the aligned assignment. If you would like other suggestions for how to counter English assignments with non CC aligned activities, leave me a comment with what you are looking for. I can help!

4) Participate, if you can, in the upcoming “College Board” Forum. They’ll be having a grand time discussing more alignments, more rigor, how the SAT alignment is progressing and more! The Forum is in CA, and is to be held 10/27-29, 2014. (details: http://forum.collegeboard.org/) Can’t make it to CA? There’s a Twitter handle already set up, you can follow it, #CBForum14 If you are interested, be sure to look at the extensive list of colleges who will be participating in the College Fair (a portion of the Forum). I spied several public AND private colleges. Hmmm..makes you want to see if all of them are CCSS aligned as well.

5) Draw up a petition to present to your school board that expresses the parents/students wishes to NOT use Springboard, College Board or AP classes! Write your legislators urging them to STOP their paid support of College Board CCSS aligned products. Help stop the misconception so prevalent..that all with CCSS aligned materials is a calm pool of delight. Stir up the water, folks!