Tag Archives: US Dept of Ed

Ed/Workforce’s Dirty Laundry?!

Hello, my Anti Fed Ed/CCSS Warriors! As you know, I’ve dedicated years to researching just how deep the roots to the shift in American education to workforce training are.

Today’s article will give you a rundown which is sure to help your War vs the Core in your State.

Why you need such a rundown of items is simple. The CCSS Machine’s rhetoric will somewhat slow down during the summer months. A perfect opportunity for us to make some moves of our own. No battle is won without specific preparation.

D.C.’s Dirty Laundry:

So far, during the current Congressional session, there are PLENTY of ‘dirty’ education/workforce bills in the making. Using the Congress.gov website (where you can easily look up bills), there are 733 Workforce bills for the 2017 session.

Since we know what happens in D.C. travels to each of the 50 States, we know what to look for at our General Assemblies, State Congresses, etc. Much like the proverbial red towel left in the load of white sheets, the goal of the CCSS Machine is simple, make all education ‘pink’ (ie: workforce training, not academic-minded). As we also, know, once dyed pink, sheets do not return to their former color easily, if at all.

Below are only a few of the ‘dirty’ bills:

S268, Investing in Student Success Act of 2017 (Senator Young from IN is the main sponsor).
Sounds not so ‘dirty’ right? I mean who doesn’t want to invest in their child’s post-secondary education?! Ah, but Warriors, the ‘dirt’ is that your student and someone not related to you invests in their education via an ISA (Income Share Agreement).

S268
Some hidden ‘dirt’ for S268 is that this FEDERAL bill goes above any existing State law about investment agreements! Targeted group for S268? Low-income students.

HR1837, The 21st Century Energy Workforce Act (Representative Norcross from NJ is the main sponsor)
This bill points out that energy in the United States is the 3rd largest industry. As such, it needs more skilled workers than other industries.
The ‘hidden dirt’ to this bill? Using community colleges for the uniting of all educational choices for STEM/CTE aligned Common Core workforce educated students. (*Note: STEM is short for Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math; CTE is short for Career Technical Education. Both are tied to Common Core and have been for years.)

The embedded ‘pink’ stain to this bill? The Secretary of Energy will be in charge of grants for creating apprenticeships to carry all this alignment out. This will, of course, involve the U.S. Dept. of Labor, and the U.S. Dept. of Education.
This HR1837, also establishes a National Center for Excellence for the  21st Century Workforce Advisory Board.(see pages 3 and 4)

HR1837

Warriors, notice the ‘pipeline’ begins in elementary school!
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A Former ‘Stain’ Which Will Not Wash Out:

Our Senate, over the past 2 Congressional sessions, has tried to get a bill to support a National Workforce Board. See below from Sen. Cantwell’s (WA):

S1304
S1304, was last introduced during the 2015-2016 Session by Sen. Cantwell. If you read the 9 pages, it is very similar in several instances to the HR 1837 language. Talk about ‘dirty laundry’….
*****************************************************************

New Wash Load, Same Old Dirt:

During THIS Congressional Session (2017-2018) The Senate’s 21st Century Energy Workforce Act is mainly sponsored by Sen. Heinrich, NM. It is S895.

S895’s title is officially “Energy Workforce for the 21st Century Act of 2017”. This bill specifies an increase in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) especially for low-income students of ALL ages (like the House’s bill, this one will begin in elementary schools and go all the way to the workforce). This bill also specifies WIOA (Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act’s) definition of ‘education’..just like ESSA did.

S895 will have not only the Secretary of Energy creating education collaborations, but awarding all kinds of incentives to them.

S895

Warriors, if you missed my article from earlier this year about how the major Cabinet agencies all have CTE/STEM plans to streamline education to workforce skills, I urge you to access that information here. It is absolutely key to what we see Congress plotting NOW.

Also, take into consideration that the Federal Budget has millions of taxpayer funds earmarked for job creation. On Page 2 of the 2018 Federal Budget, energy development is at the top of the continued priority list. Education is last. On Page 8, funding/discussion for American jobs is highlighted.

Back in March 2017, when the Blueprint for the Federal Budget was released, I shared with you just how the education/workforce stream of money was being kept alive, in spite of all the noise about reining in the federal overreach into education.
Here is that article. (*Note: be sure to access my special 5 page guide to see just how the Cabinet level agenices are involved. It will help in understanding the Congressional bills we are exposing in this article.)

Continuing the Spin Cycle:

S1186 is sponsored by several Senators from across the nation. Leading them is Sen. Baldwin from WI. This bill, the Domestic Maritime Centers of Excellence Act of 2017, would have the Secretary of Transportation select existing community colleges (and technical schools) for an increase in educated workforce training. This Secretary’s assistance also includes funding, use of federal resources, AND, create new career pathways!

S628, Educating Tomorrow’s Workforce Act of  2017 is mainly sponsored by Sen. Kaine of VA. While it’s been rumored VA never had Common Core, it’s been researched and proven VA has Common Core’s ‘adult version’ of education, CTE (Career Tech Education). This bill should be an absolute dead ringer for exposing the shift in education. Why? See below:

S628

Closing:

Warriors, as you can see, these are just a few of the over 700 bills Congress has created in the name of job creation, education, workforce skills, and more. The bottom line, however, is 100% alignment to WIOA via ESSA. HEA (Higher Education Act) is also to be included. Career Pathways, STEM, and so much more connects every one of these existing laws and proposed bills. Will every one of these bills survive? No, but even if ONE of them succeeds, look at the agenda it embeds, not only federally, but LOCALLY.
The ‘stain’ of CCSS Machine reform is becoming permanently marked on America.

 

Human capital concept in tag cloud
Is this what we will continue to allow Congress to see when it comes to our children?!

 

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My State In The W_ _ _ d

Hello, Anti Fed Ed, Anti CCSS, and Anti Global Ed Warriors! If you noticed, I’ve added a ‘new’ type of Warrior to the list.

Since I began researching the shift in education (2009), I knew from one of Tom DeWeese’s articles that the end game for education in America was globally tied.

It was, in fact, this particular article and another one (by Cathy Duffy) about the push in America for national standards, which bothered me enough to begin researching!

As you know, since then, I’ve found plenty of evidence to support BOTH of these well respected citizens’ findings.  Since I began blogging (2014), the flood gates to support even more evidence to the global/national standards has come my way. I’ve done my best to share all that I can with you, so that, all of us are as informed as we can be in our War Vs. the Core.

You might be wondering about the title of this particular article. It’s short for “My State in the World”.

Warriors,  here are some documents I’ve found which point directly to the facts that education in your State hasn’t been American for some time now. Between our Governors and Public Depts of Education/Instruction, the UN/UNESCO shift has been in place since the mid 1980s! What follows is an in-depth, information packed article.

Take your time in reading and researching what’s in your State. It’s imperative!

The Files in Timeline Form:

(1985): So far, this is the oldest evidence I have found. It’s from MN.
The Report is one created by a global education task force that had been set up to prepare the way for a K-12th grade “Global Education Decade”  beginning in the 1999-2000 academic year. By starting this gigantic ball rolling in 1985, all the framwork would be in place by 1990. It is in this Report titled “Minnesota in the World”, that you’ll see the ’21st Century needs’ rhetoric popping up.

Let me be clear, you will NOT see the UN/UNESCO mentioned in this Report. However, the imprint is there. Who you will see as an influential force behind the shift for MN, is the (then) Dean of the Hubert H. Humphrey Institute of Public Affairs at the University of Minnesota (Harlan Cleveland). Cleveland wrote a book called “The Knowledge Executive”.
The “MN in the World” Report includes excerpts. Here’s a screen shot:

harlan

How was Cleveland tied to the UN? Google Books includes his biography. He led post WWII rebuilding efforts for the UN. Google’s bio also reveals Cleveland was a top leader in the Marshall Plan; that he was appointed by President Kennedy as an Assistant Secretary of State to the UN.

President Einsenhower tagged Cleveland as a NATO official. You will also see his ties to the Aspen Institute and more. (*Note: if you’d like to see how the modern day Aspen Institute and others are directing the States to the UN/global shift via ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act), find it here.)

Not only will Cleveland be one to note in the MN Report, but also,  former U.S. Dept. of Education Secretary, T. H. Bell. Look below for his proclamation.

bell Mr. Bell was appointed by President Reagan as the Sec. of Education. He is the same Bell who headed up the Committee which produced the 1983 “Nation At Risk” report.
Bell also was the National Commission of Education (housed then in the U.S. Dept. of Interior) before the creation of the U.S. Dept. of Education.

We can ‘thank’ the 1983 version of “Nation At Risk” for the national assessments increase as well as the use of the word ‘accountability’ as a call for more federal dollars to flow into our States. Thanks to ESSA, the ‘accountability’ means more control from the U.S. Dept. of Education, NOT less.

(1987): Look below, the book emphasized is not available in its complete form, on-line.
(*Note the underlined participants.)

1987book

(Entering the 1990s):
From the UNESCO on-line library,  you’ll find documents dating back to the mid 1990s for the shift in technical/vocational education, which has been rebranded as “CTE” or ‘Career Tech Education’ here in the United States. I found the document where ‘lifelong learning’ is described as a bridge to the future. It’s from 1999.  Look below for a modern rendition of such a ‘bridge’:

hebridge
Then, factor in this OECD (Organization of Economic Cooperation and Development) document’s proclamation below:

lifelong

Warriors, this particular Report (as seen above) was published in 2007. But look at the original year OECD released ‘lifelong learning’..1996. As far as I have been able to find, no on-line version of the 1996 original book is available. You can access it via several university libraries, however. Here’s a description as to why it is vital we find it.

(1999):  NC’s educational shift to globalization appears to have taken place around this time.
ncshift

(From 2000 to currently):
(2001):
UNESCO’s  5 year review of the 1996 ‘beginnings’ for ‘lifelong learning’.
OCED’s 5 year review of the 1996 ‘beginnings’.

(2006): NC’s Governor creates the first Center for 21st Century Skills in the nation.
See below:
NConeworld
To see Report One (2007) and Report Two (2007), click on each year. (To access my previous article on NC’s Global Readiness, click here.)

(2007):
A Western Michigan University look at ‘lifelong learning’ by Professor Emeritus Bosco.
Look below:
bosco
In the modern educational reform you’ll find Professor Bosco is an investigator for the CoSN (Consortium of School Networking), as well. CoSN is a big part of the CCSS Machine. I wrote about their part in “The Redefining Ready” Initiative in 2016.

(2009):
This NY based resource was originally begun in 2006 and updated to this form in 2009.
What’s interesting in this resource, is that it  pointed out that the US federal level of education looked first to New York and Massachussettes for educational policies. There are several other very interesting pieces of evidence in this resource as well. For example, each President’s involvement in education is included from 1945-2009.
NYresource

Observations from this resource:
What were the educational policies from NY and MA back in the 60s?  I have no clue as to why those policies were worthy enough to become nationally known or used. I do question how much of those policies helped shape the 1965 ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act). I do question why our federal government would choose the 2 States where we can find today, some of the biggest CCSS Machine member organizations/supporters.

I was able find that NY amended its educational law to reflect 21st Century learning and global education back in 1999. (*Note: scroll down to the text portion of the page.)

What about MA? I found a thesis where the history of MA’s shift to global education is laid out. The State specific information begins on page 48. You’ll find UNESCO’s SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals), The Asia Society (the State of NC is knee-deep in a relationship with them), and so much more. However, look below at what the author found are the ‘must-haves’ for global education to survive:

maglobe

Warriors, have you seen these 5 elements where you live? If your State is seeing a shift in Teacher training for global education, start on page 36. It’s all laid out.

(2013): NC’s Global Education Task Force Report reveals STEM is one of the biggest tools to shift education, not for academics, but for economic purposes.

(2014):  Harvard University (the very same pro CCSS/CTE, Pearson Publishing partnership which created Pathways to Prosperity and thus helped create Career Pathways for education), pumped out this Report on global education.

Interestingly enough, some of the ‘expert solutions’ for aligning education? Increase apprenticeships, create more charter schools, and, cause a unity between government, education, and, teachers.
(*Note: one of the featured experts in the above Report, has an open page of resources on the MA Assoc. for School Superintendents for MA’s G21 (Global21) Project. All kinds of resources can be found there.)

(2015): Washington Times Reporter Bethany Blankley reveals the Qatar Foundation participation in the global shift in education. See the screen shot below:
bethanyarticle

More vital resources for your Anti Warrior’s information:
a) Berit Kjos’s timeline of Common Core throughout the world.
b) My 2016 international data mining article.
c) Charlotte Iserbyt’s “Exposing the Road to Global Ruin” You Tube series (begin with the short introduction video at the 1:38 time mark and follow the connected videos.)
d) Diana Anderson’s excellent compiled article on global education.

Closing:

Warriors, I am, by no means claiming to have the authoritative voice on the shift in global education. I believe Charlotte Iserbyt, Diana Anderson, and many others before me have that. However, when we use their roots and add the information as it surfaces, we help create a strong force of information that answers many questions.
We also can see many things which have been played down by our leaders, or, worse, left out completely. We also can use this information to form new ways in which to protect our students AND our nation.

I urge you, look in your State’s legislative archives for when your “State and the World Project” began. It may be under a slightly different name, but the signs ARE there.

Monday Musings: The CCSS “Are You Kidding Me?!” Files

While this cartoon was depicted a U.S. Congress run by monopolists, it can easily resemble the 'CCSS Machine' running  education.
While this cartoon was depicted a U.S. Congress run by monopolists, it can easily resemble the ‘CCSS Machine’ running education.

As October winds down, anti CCSS Warriors, the hype supporting CCSS appears to be ramping up. Today’s post will show you how. Use the information to keep the pressure to STOP ‘Common Core’ (and all its aliases)!

First up, Special Needs:

Those running the CCSS/CTE Machine have made it no secret that ALL students, regardless of their educational choice OR abilities are to be run through the streamlined fare ‘Common Core Standards’ and all its accompanying resources. This, sadly, impacts our special needs kids. IF your family receives any IDEA funding, you are being subjected to CCSS in some way. When the schools receive their IDEA funding (and this includes post-secondary schools or all kinds), your students are most definitely being slammed with Common Core, Career and College Readiness, STEM, and, Career Ed Tech.  To find out MORE, please refer back to https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/10/19/monday-musings-idea-when-good-goes-ccscte-bad/
If you would like the ECS (Education Commission of the States) document from 2014 where plans to collect more ‘measurements’ of special needs students progress as well as their parents, see: SPtracking To see another way the special needs students were tracked, is a report from 2004. See: SpecNeedsDataCollect If you’d like to learn just how toxic the re-authorization of the ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) via HR5 (Student Success Act), please read Anita Hoge‘s article where she speaks in plain English how special needs students (as well as all the other types will be marginalized horribly).
http://www.newswithviews.com/Hoge/anita113.htm

 

Here Come the STEM, CCSS latest moves:

Most folks balk at me when I even dare to mention how STEM is tied to CCSS, yet, the evidence is there. In case you didn’t see the news about the STEM Act passed into law at the federal level, here’s the article where I shared all the news about it. The Act is named “The STEM Education Act of 2015”. Why would a new Act concerning education be a problem? First, it’s at a FEDERAL level! As in ‘federally led education’. On Twitter anti CCSS Warriors refer to it as ‘fed led ed’. Secondly, the federal level law dictates a certain type of course now be included in STEM. Seriously?! Yes!! So where was the parental input? Where was the local level of education? It was excluded…just like we’ve seen from D.C. more and more in our recent past. This Act involves several other federal agencies in education, alignment, and data mining! This Act is so overreaching into education, it will not stop at the school yard’s boundary. No, this one takes education into almost every informal learning environment we could possibly use. For example, your libraries, museums, field trips, and so on. Again, HR5 (see above) has stealthily embedded the CCSS tied-STEM into the language as part of the  ‘afterschool programs’ and ‘wraparound services’.
Read all about it: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/10/21/wybi-tying-stem-to-ccss-again/
If you’d like to see the archive where I was able to find the STEM tie to HR5, refer to:
http://wpllc.net/tag/hr5/

Rumor Has It:

I’m including my release of this past “Weekend’s News” because you have to get the vital information somehow! What do I mean? I’m referring to the ‘block’ I received from social media when I was sharing the truth about what’s up in America and CCSS. Once again, (this isn’t my first time being blocked), and, as other anti CCSS Warriors have experienced, the CCSS Machine tried to stop me. But, the funny thing about truth is..it ALWAYS wins! Thankfully, several of my fellow Warriors, picked up the story and passed it on for me. However, there are many others who didn’t get the what’s up. So, I’ll state briefly WHY the “Weekend News” was so controversial it got blocked.
1) It named certain people as being involved in the corruption of education in America
2) I openly displayed the social media site in some of my screen shots
3) Point by point CCSS/CTE/STEM tied programs were specifically named and tied back to a well known university
4) Of those named, two are legislators in NC and another is running for the US Presidency
5) I exposed the fallacy which was shared over social media that NC had removed CCSS recently, when in fact, the original source was from 2014 AND didn’t tell the entire story!
Get it while you can: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/10/25/weekend-news-ccss-rumors-abound-at-least-in-nc/

I urge you, read the article. It IS so vital to our War Against the Core! You need to see just how far the CCSS/CTE Machine is going to place specific people in very educational influential positions. Yes, we’ve seen this before, BUT the operators of the CCSS Machine are becoming less and less stealthy about it! We MUST act! We MUST continue to expose the injustice that is happening every day in America via education reform! We know the bottom line isn’t an academic education, it’s about a ‘talent pipeline’ to feed a ‘workforce agenda’.

From ‘Your’ U.S. Dept. of Ed:

As you read this, the US DofEd is hosting a “Parent Camp”. I kid you not. If you use Twitter, be sure to look up ‘#ParentCamp’. You won’t believe the ‘shuck and jive’ dribble about education leading parents. Better yet, why not scoot over to the US DofEd’s Family Engagement page. There you can find all kinds of things the Dept has put together to show you HOW to parent THEIR way! Think I’m joking?! Read this excerpt, “If effective cradle-to-career educational partnerships between home and school are to be implemented with fidelity and sustained, engagement initiatives must include a concerted focus on developing adult capacity, whether through pre- and in-service professional development for educators; academies, workshops, seminars, and workplace trainings for families;” Want to read the rest? Be sure not to miss that one of the 4Cs in this parental persuasion is ‘human capital’!
USDofEDparent

 

From The US Chamber of Commerce’s Education and Workforce Committee:

Their latest efforts? Using local Workforce Boards to highlight the skills gap needs to be closed. As I’ve shared in the past (as have other anti CCSS Warriors, there is NOT a skills gap! The CCSS Machine has presented the fallacy that such a gap exists, but it does not)

The skills gap 'fear factor' fallacy is successful because those spreading it, use the wrong numbers s their source.
The skills gap ‘fear factor’ fallacy is successful because those spreading it, use the wrong numbers as their source.

By the way, the article to which the Chamber refers is worth reading. Get it:
http://www.ocregister.com/articles/county-688751-employers-workforce.html
Here is the picture the “Register” chose for the article:
skilltree

So, my fellow Warriors Against CCSS, we have MUCH to do and not much time in which to accomplish it!

Monday Musings: CCSS Tech Schedule

"EdSurge" just announced all the technology based conferences for the next year. You can be sure the Common Core  Machine will be there.
“EdSurge” just announced all the technology based conferences for the next year. You can be sure the Common Core Machine will be there.

The ‘Common Core Machine’ is busy cranking out all kinds of support/resources/gadgets to promote our continued alignment as a nation.  Continue to read on to find out how the Gates Foundation, the Joyce Foundation, the New Schools Venture Fund, Graham Holdings, GSV Capital, Imagine K12, and Learn Capital are behind this effort.

The “EdSurge” Announcement:

Recently “EdSurge” (an independent education technology resource for ‘anyone’) released the 2015-16 technology education conference schedule. If you enlarge the graphic you’ll have a first hand guide to the technology companies devoted to the CCSS Machine. In my introductory paragraph I shared with you some well known pro CCSS organizations. If you’re wondering how I discovered who backs and supports EdSurge, it is on their website.
See the screen shot, then visit their website:
surgesupportWhat’s interesting about “EdSurge” is if you read the “Ethics Statement” provided, you’ll run across this paragraph, “All our investors support journalistic independence; they do not attempt to influence our coverage. We have received grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and Joyce Foundation to support the development of our website. We have received funding from GSV Capital, NewSchools Venture Fund, Learn Capital, Catamount Ventures and the Women’s Venture Capital Fund.” Okay, is it just myself, or do you question how ‘independent’ a media source can truly be with pro CCSS backing like this? Somehow I’m not ‘sold’ on this concept of ‘objectivity’. From my research, any time you run across a group so heavily supported by agenda driven money, you’re more likely to be ‘subjective’ in your efforts. Let’s move on, shall we?

If You’d Like to See the “Who’s Who” at EdSurge’s Conferences:

“EdSurge” is pretty cheeky, I’ll give them that. Why do I state this? Go back to the first screen shot. You’ll see it’s bright, colorful, and packed with information an anti CCSS Warrior can use. The ‘cheeky’ part (in my opinion) is that “EdSurge” has put this up for sale, so you the customer, can enjoy it 24/7. No! I’m not spending one dime of my money to knowingly support Common Core. I protest my tax money being used for it, but as we’ve seen, the citizens didn’t get to choose HOW our tax money has been used to undermine education.


You can also download a free 2 page pdf of the schedule of conferences, if you like. It’s free, as far as I can tell. Why the poster is worth accessing is this: you can see which cities and states are hosting. Why would we need this? If we’re going to fight the CCSS Machine, we have to mobile, we have to be ready to meet it head on. The main entities hosting the various themed conferences are a “who’s who” in the CCSS landscape. For example, one city will be hosting a conference lead by the NCEA for faith-based K-20 education leadership training; another will find the AASA gathering school superintendents to celebrate 150 years (no, that’s not necessarily a negative, but consider any time you gather to celebrate the past, the focus shifts to the future. It’s the future we need to be prepared for); another city’s conference will find inACOL hosting a blended learning ‘tell all’. This list of indoctrination grinds on! If you’re not sure how the above examples are entrenched in all things CCSS, I’ll be sure to provide links for you in the closing.
To access this all important tool:
 https://d3e7x39d4i7wbe.cloudfront.net/static_assets/Conference_Infographic_8.5x11_2.pdf

“EdSurge” Summits:

Another service “EdSurge” can provide you is Education Leadership Summits. Educators can attend for free. Companies are encouraged to foot the bill. (ie: Public, private partnerships; ask yourselves, how many times the CCSS Machine relies on P3s to carry out its mission?)  What the summits cover for you, the educator? The latest in education solutions AND technology. See the educator day parameters: https://www.edsurge.com/summits/educator and https://www.edsurge.com/summits/administrator

What about the businesses, what do they have to do to get involved? Showcasing the latest products designed to help you implement educational ‘success’. See the business requirements:
https://www.edsurge.com/summits/companies_sponsors

The “Fun” Video:

Here’s the YouTube sales pitch for “EdSurge’s” Educator Summits. Notice the vendor in yellow. Listen for the CCSS buzzwords, too.

The “EdSurge” Panel Discussion:

Back in 2012, “EdSurge” hosted a panel discussion to showcase a new initiative called the “Maker Education Initiative”. I’m providing the You Tube link for your background information. Why? Among the panelists is a U.S. Dept. of Education representative. Again, listen to the buzzwords, the rhetoric, and the ‘whole learning’ concept as it relates to CCSS (verbally admitted at about the 8:22 mark) and the heavy suggestions toward STEM (which is also absolutely tied to CCSS).

To learn more about “Maker Education Initiative”, visit: http://makered.org/
To see what groups sponsor “Maker”, visit: http://makered.org/about-us/sponsors/
From the “Makers” 2013 Annual Report, I found this one statement in the introduction, “Our flagship program, Maker Corps, exhibited the potential of an innovative online training model to empower facilitators with the confidence to lead unique, quality making experiences at their institutions. By placing trained Maker Corps Members in settings such as children’s museums, libraries, schools, and community-based organizations, we were able to reach more then 90,000 youth and families across 19 states.” To read the rest of the annual report (which is very telling of so much more): Annual-Report-Design_1.8.15_FINAL_web

Closing:

If you’re interested in finding out more about the NCEA (National Catholic Educators Association) and their ties to Common Core, please see:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/26/rmt-have-you-heard-of-the-cccii/ 
(even if you are not of the Catholic faith, please consider reading this as it contains links to other faith-based CCSS tied information)

To understand more about inACOL( the International Association for K-12 On-line Learning), I offer you this resource: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/24/fom-friday-knowledgeworks-or-knowledge-quirks/

To find out how the AASA (American Association of School Adminstrators)is involved in CCSS, here is my article from last month (packed with all kinds of links): 
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/05/07/tech-thursday-upskilling-america-part-2/

Warriors, we have lots of ground to cover this summer. Let’s get organized and get out there!

WYBI Wednesday: ICE, Chilling Our Education

Typically ice cubes make our drinks more enjoyable. However, when ICE hits education, it's anything but enjoyable.
Typically ice cubes make our drinks more enjoyable. However, when ICE hits education, it’s anything but enjoyable.

In yesterday’s post, I revealed quite a bit about an international credentialing company tied to Common Core. Today’s “Would You Believe It” Wednesday post, looks at the American based companies. Will they, too, be tied to Common Core?

ICE (aka: Institute for Credentialing Excellence):

Here’s how they describe themselves, “The Institute for Credentialing Excellence, or ICE, is a professional membership association that provides education, networking, and other resources for organizations and individuals who work in and serve the credentialing industry.  ICE is a leading developer of standards for both certification and certificate programs and it is both a provider of and a clearing house for information on trends in certification, test development and delivery, assessment-based certificate programs, and other information relevant to the credentialing community.” {note: website address is http://www.credentialingexcellence.org/p/cm/ld/fid=32)
Below is a screen shot from the latest Annual Report showing the USA and where ICE members are located.

icemembers

Who Is Shaping the Credentials? Again, using the 2013-14 Annual Report, you can find there are members from the Alpine Institute, Pearson VUE (gee, what a surprise), Cisco Systems(data mining), and a Psychometrician (Careers in Psychology have this description for what psychometrics are),

“Psychometrics is the science of measuring people’s mental capacities and thought processes through a systemized manner. In other words, it’s a way to create tests to determine how smart we are or what are personalities are like. Psychometricians are the scientists behind those interesting – and sometimes nerve wracking – aptitude and personality tests. The tests that these professionals create help to better understand how the mind works. They are able to measure the how a mind functions and how it compares to other groups of people.” The Report: 2013-14 ICE Annual Report v3 Final

ICE’s “Other” Arm:
NCCA (National Commission on Certifying Agencies)
This particular part of ICE was created to ensure all of the citizens in America were actually safe while we used the many services ICE accredited. For example, if I wanted to work in aviation, ICE would accredit the National Aviation Business Association and NCCA would keep them accountable so I’d be able to earn my credentials to get a job. (You’ll need to look at the many healthcare agencies they oversee, especially knowing CC aligned courses are being taught). What I found interesting about this arm of ICE, is their “Career Center” page. If you want, you can become employed by AIR, Inc. (America Institutes for  Research, Inc.; as in Common Core related assessment measuring AIR, Inc.) as a psychometrician!! See the actual job posting, http://careers.credentialingexcellence.org/jobseeker/job/21233199/
{Note: heading up the NCCA? A member from the Alpine Testing Solutions, Inc.}

Alpine Testing:

I must confess, I mistook this company for another one by a similar name and was about to pass it over, when a search turned up a post by the President of Alpine Testing Solutions (according to their own website, the name “Alpine Media Corporation” was used from 1998-2005). The president then was Arana Greenburg. Her paper, “WBT: The New Millennium: Training at the Speed of Change”. {note: WBT stands for ‘web based training’} (see: http://www.isoc.org/inet99/proceedings/2a/2a_1.htm ) You’ll want this paper. Why? It details the purposed transition of not only assessments (which now lead to credentials), but how computer testing was in need of becoming ‘COOL’ (Collaborative, Objective Based, On-line, Lifelong Learning Oriented). She goes on to cite B.F. Skinner’s work, how students will go from one knowledge based to ‘just enough’. She details shifts in how learning parameters have shifted, how assessments were to become the core of education and oh, so much more that we now have been able to connect to CC. What else you might find interesting is that the author graduated with a social policy doctorate. You’ll need to see who she used to work for.
One more note about Alpine Testing, they are affiliated with NRMERA (Northern Rocky Mountain Education Research Association). How does NRMERA feel about Common Core, Career/College Readiness?? They embrace it! See this presentation from 2012 titled “Success for All” : http://www.nciea.org/publication_PDFs/NRMERASuccessForAll_BG100412

Take a look at the ICE 2014 Conference Book, there you’ll find Pearson VUE presented several workshops on various topics surrounding credentials that span the globe; you’ll see Cisco Systems also among those who presented. ACT, Inc. (which is also a partner of the International group I shared with you in yesterday’s post about international credentials being tied to CCS) also was at the conference. See the resource, http://issuu.com/credentialingexcellence/docs/2014_ice_exchange_final_program

If you’d like to see who is funding all the research for ICE, http://www.credentialingexcellence.org/p/cm/ld/fid=181

The Gates Foundation, the U.S. Dept. of Ed and the Rest of the Credential Bunch:

After a bit of digging I found the pdf file for the 2009 Round table discussion that was to help both the Gates Foundation’s and the U.S. government’s initiatives concerning post-secondary education get moving toward globalization via credentials, degrees, and whatever else in between you could master. Here’s an excerpt, “The intent of the round table is to identify and define the nature of the array of post-secondary subbaccalaureate credentials (e.g., certificates, certifications, licenses), ascertain the nature of the institutions involved in granting and overseeing such credentials, and discuss the implications for public policy.” Download the document, Subbac-Roundtable-Mtg-Notes_110309

The Business Roundtable’s Efforts for Credentials and Your Students:

Extremely pro Common Core/STEM supportive group “Business Roundtable” released last July (2014) what they are doing to ensure CC credentialed education. Here’s a tiny portion of what’s happening, ”

“Defining clearly the attributes of quality, valid industry credentials, making it easier for students, learning centers and employers to know which credentials and certifications matter.”

Want the entire ‘game plan’? See, http://businessroundtable.org/resources/taking-action-connect-learning-work Oh, if you’d like to see HOW the Business Roundtable plans to help the workforce become as aligned to CC as possible, be sure to read their “Action Step List”, where the number one priority is to  “Fully adopt and implement the Common Core State Standards” (Action List: http://businessroundtable.org/resources/taking-action-on-education-workforce-preparedness)

If you’d like to see more of the BRT’s CC supportive materials, search their website, trust me, you’ll find plenty.

One Last Resource:

Back in 2002, a dissertation by Kathy Emery, titled “The Business Roundtable and Systemic Reform: How Corporate-Engineered High-Stakes Testing Has Eliminated Community Participation in Developing Educational Goals and Policies”. Quite detailed, super ammo for the anti CCSS warrior. (Emery_Dissertation_all

Closing:

So, while the past two days have given you plenty of ties that bind our students to credentials bought and paid for with funds from CCSS, I hope you’ll be able to use the resources, information provided to wage war on the Core, thereby melting any tainted ICE you find.

Tech Thursday: National Career Pathways Network

CP Network: A national outreach full of strings on all levels with one goal in mind: your aligned, trained student.
CP Network: A national outreach full of strings on all levels with one goal in mind: your aligned, trained student.

The Network:

If you’ve followed my blog long, you know each Thursday is devoted to Common Core beyond high school. Today is no different. If you’ve not been made aware of this network, you’ll want to get to know about it. It’s called the “National Career Pathways Network” and they have quite an agenda. (website: http://www.ncpn.info/index.php)

The Agenda:

Career Pathways is post-secondary Common Core and is coming at our students (regardless of age or school choice) via the recent Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014. I’m providing the links to the 2 articles I wrote about CP/WIOA on the “Prevent Common Core” website. (see: http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1187 from 09/14 and http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1201 from 10/14)

According the the Network’s website there are 10 agenda points for POSs (Programs of Study) for Career Pathways. So every time a student takes a CP course, you’ll know these 10 are woven into it:
1) Legislation and Policies (ie: from federal, state, and local levels)
2) Partnerships (ie: more P3s or public/private partnerships)
3) Professional Development (ie: career tech alignment courses)
4) Accountability and Evaluation Systems (ie: more data mining)
5) College and Career Readiness Standards (ie: more Common Core disguised as not CCSS)
6) Course Sequences (ie: aligning the track between secondary and post-secondary schools)
7) Credit Transfer Agreements (ie: keeping the alignment accountable)
8) Guidance Counseling and Academic Advisement (ie: can’t have trained workers without trained guidance)
9) Teaching and Learning Strategies (ie: more project based, collaborative learning)
10) Technical Skills Assessments (ie: assessments from federal, state, and local levels)

To see the entire pdf of  these 10 agenda items and to learn even more about HOW they factor into Career Tech Education/Career Pathways: 10ComponentsofPOS

The U. S. Dept. of Labor’s Six Key Elements of Career Pathways:

From the DOL’s website, a report dated September 2011, was written by an outside group for the DOL under the ‘Career Pathways Technical Assistance Initiative’ project. That outside group? Social Policy Research  Associates. The report is chock full of more ways to collaborate, to align, to join forces, more global competitive rhetoric, more skills gap pleas, and assessments to impact everyone involved.

Here’s an excerpt of how CPs (Career Pathways) are defined by the Dept. of Labor, “WHAT ARE CAREER PATHWAYS? Career pathway-oriented workforce development has the goal of increasing individuals’ educational and skills attainment and improving their employment outcomes while meeting the needs of local employers and growing sectors and industries. Career pathway programs offer a clear sequence, or pathway, of education coursework and/or training credentials aligned with employer-validated work readiness standards and competenciesThis systems approach makes it easier for people to earn industry-recognized credentials (through more flexible avenues and opportunities for relevant education and training) and to attain marketable skills so that they can more easily find work in growing careers.”  *Note: Repeatedly throughout the report, you’ll see that the CPs were to target ADULT learners, CPs were to include those individuals who find they are displaced, or incarcerated. So WHY are we finding more and more CP alignment in elementary and secondary schools? Simple answer: Common Core.

So, what are those Dept. of Labor 6 keys to CPs? 1. Build cross-agency partnerships and clarify roles; 2. Identify sector or industry and engage employers; 3. Design education and training programs; 4. Identify funding needs and sources; 5. Align policies and programs; 6. Measure system change and performance.  In anti Common Core speak, these keys mean 1) sharing vision of outcomes, getting politicians to support vision; 2) have industry/business help lay out CP; 3) lessons taught follow the framework of #2; 4) find the money for leveraging purposes; 5) promotes the CP on a united front; and 6) assess, assess, assess. The Dept. of Labor has a nice picture graphic of the Pathway (oddly enough, in the shape of a circle):

The path that leads in a circle soon gets you nowhere.
The path that leads in a circle soon gets you nowhere.

Meet the ‘designers’ of the Career Pathway, per the 2011 report,  see the picture below (click to enlarge it):

cp2011crew

You’ll definitely want to look at the entire report, it details the key people needed in your community to pull a successfully aligned Career Pathway off. See: CareerPathwaysToolkit2011

Has anything been updated since 2011 in the Career Pathway Initiative? Not too much has actually changed. There are still the 2011 resources seen above in use.

What has happened is the net that’s cast has broadened. Website: https://learnwork.workforce3one.org/page/about 

( my previous post from 11/14 delved into more about Career Pathways/Tracks, etc.)see below:

https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/06/tech-thursday-workforce-commissions-education-and-common-core/ *Note, links to connect more dots between CP and CCSS will be at the bottom of this post.

Selling the Career Pathway:

I’m including a 2012 Success School Network video that will help illustrate how CPs are being ‘sold’ to our schools. Speaking is the Ga. State Superintendent (John Barge). The Harvard study he refers to is one I’ve written on before “Pathways to Prosperity”. It was a joint effort between Harvard University and Pearson Publishing. The Summit this video was featured in was provided by the School Success Network. All 3 (Harvard, Pearson, and School Success) have well documented ties to Common Core Standards. So, objectivity? Not a chance! By the way, the way in which we’re being sold? State legislation!! Departments of Commerce!!

Related: School Success Network to Common Core: http://www.schoolimprovement.com/products/common-core-360/

How to effectively implement CC: http://www.schoolimprovement.com/effective-common-core-implementation/

Tying Pearson, Harvard, and Common Core:
http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1201

Another link to use in relation to Career Pathways, Pearson, Harvard, corporations, and the US Government:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/16/rmt-vp-unions-career-tech-and-common-core/

Social Policy Research Associates can help you build a ‘talent pipeline’at your school : http://www.spra.com/2014/07/15/building-a-smart-talent-pipeline/

Social Policy’s 2013 Report/Study on a CA based Youth Workforce Project:
http://testspra.com/wordpress2/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/FINAL-DCYF-YWD-Mid-Project-Report.pdf (look for ‘intentional skill building’, employer engagement, etc.)

Tech Thursday: Career Tech/Common Core and Alternative Education

Today's post, a look at Career Tech Ed (Common Core Aligned) and Alternative Education
Today’s post, a look at Career Tech Ed (Common Core Aligned) and Alternative Education.

Before we look at how Common Core via the Career Tech Education has impacted “Alternative Education”, we need to know how “AE” is defined. So, for that, I’m using the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Research Report “How Do the States Define Alternate Education?” (I must cite it as the following: Porowski, A., O’Conner, R., & Luo, J. L. (2014). How do states define alternative education?(REL 2014–038). Washington, DC: U.S. Department of Education, Institute of Education Sciences, National Center for Education Evaluation and Regional Assistance, Regional Educational Laboratory Mid-Atlantic. Retrieved from http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs.)

According to the Report’s Summary, “Alternative education programs—broadly defined as educational activities that fall outside the traditional K–12 curriculum—frequently serve students who are at risk of school failure. Because individual states or school districts define and determine the features of their alternative education programs, programs may differ in key characteristics, such as target population, setting, services, and structure.” The Report goes on to share that depending on the State, legislation may have differing definitions. For example, only 43 States and the District of Columbia have formal definitions of what alternative education is. Things considered that need to be clarified are what age groups are being targeted? Are the alternative education programs to serve those with special needs? Will there be other services provided like anger management, counseling, etc. Will the alternative education be separated from the more traditional education or will it be included among the more traditional settings?

A bit further into the Report, this definition of what alternative education can be defined as is cited, “Alternative education programs—broadly defined as educational activities that fall outside
the traditional K–12 curriculum—include home schooling, general educational development
(GED) programs, gifted and talented programs, and charter schools (Aron, 2006).”

*NOTE: If you’ve been following my blog long, you know I’ve already addressed how the GED is now aligned to Common Core and how charters, home education are finding Common Core Standards in their choices as well. If you haven’t been following for long, please be sure to use the search feature.

A federal definition of alternative education was included in the Report, “At the federal level an alternative school is defined as “a public elementary/secondary school that addresses needs of students that typically cannot be met in a regular school, provides nontraditional education, serves as an adjunct to a regular school, or falls outside the categories of regular, special, or vocational education” (Sable, Plotts, & Mitchell, 2010, p. C-1). This definition does not address alternative education programs within schools.”

The Report goes on to state that ‘Alternative Education’ has changed. Curriculum and content have been aligned to meet specific needs or goals. This means it drives the approach to the students. You’ll want to look at the tables included to see where your State lands, 

http://ies.ed.gov/ncee/edlabs/regions/midatlantic/pdf/REL_2014038.pdf

What CTE means for “Alternative Education”:

According to a special report from the Association for Career and Technical Education on Drop Out Students,(see: http://www.acteonline.org/WorkArea/DownloadAsset.aspx?id=2094) The Dropout Prevention Center/Network notes that CTE (Career Tech Education) is one of its 15 solutions or strategies. The Center/Network believes “such as individualized instruction, service-learning, community collaboration, mentoring, active learning, and educational technology. According to the Center, “A quality CTE program and a related guidance program are essential for all students.” CTE was identified to have five potential benefits to at-risk students by Schargel and Smink in Strategies to Help Solve our School Dropout Problem. These benefits include enhancement of students’ motivation and academic achievement; increased personal and social competence related to work in general; a broad understanding of an occupation or industry; career exploration and planning; and acquisition of knowledge or skills related to employment in particular
occupations or more generic work competencies.” The Association for Career and Technical Education’s Report for Students With Special Needs, titled “Transitioning Students with Special Needs into Work” (see:
Transitioning-Students-with-Disabilities-into-Work). In the picture below, be sure to enlarge it by clicking on it. CTE is dependent upon the WorkKeys assessment (which has been shown in print and video here on my blog and others to not only be Common Core aligned, but a massive data mining tool as well)

altedcc

Regardless of how your student may be considered as ‘alternative’, some truths remain the same:

1) All CTE is Common Core/Workforce aligned. (refer back to any of my Thursday posts)

2) You’ll be eligible for a “Certificate”, a “Certification”, a “License”, or a “Degree”.

3) You will be assessed multiple times and at some point need to use the WorkKeys assessment which will assign a national number. Many employers will not consider you without that national number.

4) Because Career Tech Ed has 16 clusters, you will be inserted into someone’s ‘talent supply pipeline.’

5) One of CTE’s biggest reasons for existing: Driving America’s competitiveness in the ‘global economy’.

(see: Competitiveness)

Project Search:

This program was referenced in the resources from the Assoc. for CTE (above) as a business led model for those students with special needs. Being heralded as a great P3 (Public, private partnership) look at the involved groups,

Below is a “Project Search” promo video. When you view it, please consider all that you see and hear through the lenses of Common Core aligned CTE. Since this video has been made and released the State Superintendent for Public Instruction (VA), Mary Wright has retired and Steve Sharp in now overseeing VA’s Public Instruction. He recently approved over $1 million dollars to be used for CTE equipment. (see: http://www.doe.virginia.gov/administrators/superintendents_memos/2014/201-14.shtml)

Here’s a short video about one of the ‘certificates’ available to our students courtesy of WorkKeys. Notice the “Workforce” Ready logos strategically placed throughout the settings. Again, view through the lenses of Common Core, CTE.

How I Know Common Core and CTE are related:

One of the earliest websites I discovered when embarking on research to track down Common Core beyond high school is http://www.careertech.org/CCTC  Even when you look at the page you’ll notice Common Core, but what you’ll realize is the shrewd placement of the two words. “Common Career Technical Core’. Once on the site, run your mouse over the second tab and you’ll see a drop down menu feature those “Career Clusters”, then look a few spaces down and bingo! “Common Core State Standards”, in living color. Want to find out where CTE is in your state? Use this link: http://www.careertech.org/cte-your-state If you go back to the main page and read their ‘fine print description’ you’ll see the misguidance of information. “State-led”, ‘rigorous’ are just two of the errors. Where you will really want to spend some time is the Common Core and CTE resource page: http://www.careertech.org/common-core-state-standards

Their stance on alternate education? This 2013 presentation supports UDL (Universal Designed Learning) for teaching all ‘special populations’ (their phrase, not mine)
http://www.careertech.org/sites/default/files/C1MahadevanUDL_AccessibletoAll.pdf  (originally out of the Texas Education Administration); from Alabama, a presentation on streamlining all students into CTE: http://www.careertech.org/sites/default/files/C5MSmithcareercluster-1.pdf

California’s presentation has a total transformation of the Common Core/CTE Standards, all based on information that has been created by the Common Core Machine (meaning it is based on either CCSS supporter funding or a CCSS partner). See for yourselves how they envision all people fitting into the CCSS/CTE mold: http://www.careertech.org/sites/default/files/E2WeikleExtremeMakeoverCTEStandardsEdition%282%29_1.pdf

Consider this:

Since Common Core is a one size fits all and the definition for alternate education ISN’T, which do you think will have to bend to conform to the other? I have a guess that it won’t be the Common Core. We are hearing many stories of those outside the traditional models of education. I leave you today with this short video from my wonderful anti CC warrior friend, Gretchen Logue’s Common Core/Special Needs presentation.

Tech Thursday: Perkins Gets the Common Core Squeeze

Tech Thursdays for me are an opportunity to share with you what I’ve uncovered about Common Core beyond high school. Those who have orchestrated Common Core have hidden post-secondary Common Core with names like “CTE” (Career Technical Education) or “Career Pathways” which have been embedded in the 2014 WIOA (Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act). I’ve written extensively about these. If you are new to my blog, you’ll need to refer to my very first Tech Thursday post where I broke open the myth about no Common Core beyond high school (see: September 4th’s post “Common Core After High School: Reality Check”)

Notice "US Dept. of Education" is at the top of the graphic.
Notice “US Dept. of Education” is at the top of the graphic.

So for today’s “Tech Thursday” I’d like to take you a bit further into the fact I shared with you a few days ago about the Perkins Act funding being used to force more Common Core upon our students (see: Sunday’s Post “VP, Unions, Career Tech and Common Core”). For a quick review, here’s an excerpt from Sunday’s post about the Perkins Act,
“The Perkins Act was created back in 1984, since then it’s been updated a few times. However, the original intent was to increase the quality of education that was considered technical or, at the time, vocational. With the advent of Common Core via the Career Tech, Career Clusters, Career Pathways, it’s not longer ‘cool’ to use the word ‘vocation’, now it’s ‘career’. Last updated in 2006 here are the 3 parameters that MUST happen with the Act.:
“1. Replaces “vocational education” with “career and technical education”

2. Maintains the Tech Prep program as a separate entity with federal funding within the legislation
3. Maintains state administrative funding at 5 percents of a state’s allocation
The new law also requires the development of articulation agreements and strengthens local
accountability provisions. The Perkins Act provides almost $1.3 billion annually to career and technical education programs in all 50 states until 2016.’ Each state gets to decide how to split the funding between secondary schools and post-secondary schools.”

So, today’s in-depth look will find us delving into just HOW the Perkins Act funding is promoting CTE in our students’ lives.

First stop, CTE’s blog:

According to the Career Tech Education’s blog where I typed in ‘Perkins Act’ and got the following results (see: http://blog.careertech.org/?p=11101), we can see that there’s been a study conducted on how each of the states has been able to use the federal funds to have career technical classes and programs in our schools, both secondary (high school) and post-secondary (community colleges, technical schools or colleges, and proprietary schools or colleges (for profit schools). CTE’s blog tells us the study was prepared by the NCICTE (National Center for Innovation in Career Technical Education) and the NASDCTEc (National Association of State Directors for Career Technical Education Consortium) is the group which collected study data. As usual, with most studies, it was concluded that even MORE research needed to be conducted to measure student outcome based education. As you may of noticed above Perkins funding is to be split in each state between the secondary and post-secondary institutions. Each state’s method will be a bit different in HOW they divide the funding. To help us understand HOW, consider these facts:

State financing approaches broke down into three main categories: foundational funding only, funding for area CTE centers and categorical funding.

Foundational Funding Only – All states distribute basic state aid to finance secondary education programming using a variety of formulas. In this approach, local administrators decide how to distribute funds across instructional priorities, including CTE. Nine respondents indicated they rely exclusively on foundational funding. At community or technical colleges, 30 states reported distributing funds to postsecondary institutions through block grants and not distinguishing funding for CTE.

Funding for Area CTE Centers – Through this method, funds are dedicated to support programming at area CTE centers that deliver CTE services to part-time students. Centralizing CTE programs can be a cost-effective strategy. Seven states reported having separate state funding for these centers at the secondary level and sometimes use a categorical funding approach to distribute funds.

Categorical Funding – This approach dedicates funding to support career-related instructional services and typically targets state funding for the exclusive use of CTE programming. In fact, 37 states earmarked state funds for secondary CTE using one of the following formulas: student-based (21 states), cost-based (7 states) and/or unit-based (9 states). At the post-secondary level, seven states indicated providing categorical funding, while most opted to allocate funding through basic state aid.”

Perkins Act funding is also used in a PBF (Performance Based Funding) way. Which means depending on how the students perform, complete courses and gain credentials and/or have success finding jobs is to how the funding is used. If you read the entire blog entry, you’ll see most states, at this time, do not use the PBF method.

Second stop, The Study:

Named “State Strategies for Financing Career and Technical Education”, I must include the following to honor the public domain, “U.S. Department of Education, Office of Career,
Technical, and Adult Education, State Strategies for Financing Career and Technical Education. Washington, D.C., 2014.” Did you notice the Study didn’t have the NCICTE or NASDCTEc titles BUT did have the U.S. Dept. of Education? Let’s find out why.

The Study/Report was prepared FOR the US Dept. of Ed BY the NCICTE and the NASDCTEc.  NCICTE_CTE_Finance_Study

What Perkins Money actually covers:

According the the Introductory portion of the Study,  The Perkins Act (updated 2006), “Allocations at the secondary level are based on the number of
youths ages 5–17 who reside within a local educational agency’s (LEAs) boundaries and who live in poverty. Funds for institutions of higher education (IHEs) are distributed
proportionate to the number of students who receive Pell grants or aid from the Bureau of
Indian Affairs.”

Those 3 Different Methods of Funding:

As we saw above, there are 3 main methods to fund CTE using Perkins financial allocations. The data collected by the NASDCTEc shows for the K-12 funding:
1) Categorical use can be found in 3 ways, “Student-based formula (21 states)—Funds are distributed relative to the number of CTE students enrolled in an LEA. States typically use one of three approaches: (1) proportional allocations, in which LEAs or programs receive a
funding allocation relative to the number of students enrolled; (2) weighted
student funding, which provides supplemental funding for CTE students in
state basic aid formulas; and (3) differential weighting, which allocates funding
for CTE students based on the program type in which they participate or to
align with state instructional priorities.”
Unit-based formulas (7 states)—Allocations are based on a set of educational
inputs used to deliver CTE services, such as the number of instructors or
administrators employed by an LEA or the equipment used to deliver
instruction.
Cost-based formulas (9 states)—LEAs are compensated for CTE services based
on their actual reported costs from the prior academic year. States may cap or
limit the rate at which eligible expenses are reimbursed, meaning that only a
portion of an LEA’s expenditures may be covered.

For Post-Secondary Funding, Categorical Funding is used in 2 different ways.
Student-based formulas (two states)—As in secondary education, states use this
approach to distribute funds based on the number of students enrolled in CTE
programs. Both states weight CTE student participation according to program
type.
Unit-based formulas (three states)—Three states tie state funding to CTE
instructional units as a way to fund the differential costs of course delivery. An
instructional unit is defined as the ratio of CTE instructors to student credit
hours.
According to the Study, most states are not using the PBF yet, but knowing how the 21st Century Community Learning Centers are becoming more entrenched, I wouldn’t be surprised to see PBF Perkins funding occur. (PBF, from what I could tell based funding from a community perspective, not the LEA or Higher Learning Institute’s).

So how much money ARE we talking about?

The Study shares that “The federal government offers categorical funding to states through its Perkins IV legislation. Annual contributions, which totaled $1.1 billion in fiscal year (FY) 2013, have been at roughly 4–7 percent of total spending for CTE services. In addition to federal funds, all states provide funds to support the delivery of educational services at the secondary and post-secondary levels, some of which are earmarked for the provision of CTE instruction. Finally, many local CTE programs generate their own funds to support classroom instruction, which may be monetary contributions, gifts of equipment and supplies, or in-kind donations from business, industry, and labor representatives.” (In other words, Public Private Partnerships or P3s)

Enter, the Squeeze:

As with any federal funding, there is bound to be the squeeze; meaning the strings that are attached. Because the States have accepted CTE funding, they now have to comply with the following items:

At the K-12 level:
Funding must be used to promote certain CTE fields or programming.
Serving a larger area from one campus where all the state-of-the-art technology is housed.
Aligning the CTE goals with the state’s Workforce Training Agenda.

At the Post-Secondary level:

Block grants each State can use at their discretion.
Using competitive grants which support statewide CTE initiatives.
Usually, funding is based on student enrollment.

 

Why We Need to Look at PBF:

While not widely popular at the moment, anything ‘performance based’, especially tied to Common Core, Career Pathways, Career Tech Education, will be the string that ties us down the most. How? In the context of CTE, Common Core, Performance Based Funding has you basing education on benchmarks, standards, and/or outcomes. The Study refers to the ‘U.S. Department of Education’s Blueprint for Transforming Career and Technical Education calls for establishing common performance metrics and providing incentives for high-performing programs as part of the Perkins IV re-authorization (U.S. Department of Education 2012).’ This will tie the States to seek funding based on how many students complete secondary CTE and are placed into post-secondary; how many attain jobs and/or remain employed.

Pay-as-You-Go CTE:

Also included in the Study was a series of questions the States had to answer about ‘market-driven’ models for education. “capitalizing on educational programs and social services that offer a positive return for society. Referred to by a variety of names, including “social investment bonds” and “social impact investing,” these financing vehicles draw upon funds contributed by private and philanthropic investors to offset the start-up and operating costs of innovative, research-backed programs proven to improve the economic outcomes of individuals and families (Callanan, Law, and Mendonca 2012; Social Finance 2012).” (in other words MORE P3s) Of course, used as evidence for success, a country other than the US is cited.

Final Thoughts:
Considering how the WIOA of 2014 (The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014) also has much rhetoric of CTE, Career Pathways and P3s, we would be best served by diving in, looking at this with a very fine tooth comb and getting word to our local school boards, state legislators. Common Core should NOT be around our communities’ necks like a noose. Career Tech Education, aka Adult Common Core should not be the vehicle that drives our States right into losing our students, our freedoms, or our quality of educational choices. Yet, if we sit back and allow this to transpire, that, my friends is exactly what we face.

What_Is_CTE_infographic