Tag Archives: Title 1

Bamboozling The Innocent

Anti CCSS Warriors, Anti Fed Ed Warriors, and Concerned Parents, in my last article, I spelled out for you the grab for our students who are most at-risk. For today’s I will be diving into the federal education grab for those who are among the special needs population. Maybe, by now, you know how ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) harms these students. Maybe, you would like to know more.

While ESSA is supposedly only to oversee K-12th grade education, I’ve shown you (as have others), that ESSA covers before Kindergarten and after 12th grade.

As you may also know by now, WIOA (Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act), ESSA, and HEA (Higher Education Act) all support each other 100%. WIOA is embedded in ESSA, so is the current form of HEA. When the NEW version of HEA is passed, it will almost without a doubt embed BOTH WIOA and ESSA.

Why? Warriors, remember, the goal for aligning education ISN’T about academics, it’s about work trained citizens. Special needs students are involved in this net of education lies, too!


ESSA’s Bamboozlement:
Page 23
of the Law tells us that the States can set ‘alternative’ education Standards for those with the most cognitive disabilities. However, on Page 25, you’ll see this:

disableessa

“Technology”, “higher-order thinking skills and understanding”, ‘necessary to measure..’

From the sounds of these 3 phrases, those who wrote and endorsed ESSA were either clueless or sold out to the CCSS Machine. In reality, some special needs students will not ever be capable to attain ‘higher-order thinking skills and understanding’! Yet, this law clearly demonstrates that no exception to the mandates for ‘measuring’ and ‘technology’ use will be tolerated.

Contrast ESSA’s Page 23 with this screen shot from the U.S. Dept. of Education:

2016idea

Much like the students in “Captive”, these special needs learners will not be treated with dignity or respect, but, shoved through a pipeline system.

captive
Early ESSA Evidence:

Warriors, as you know, I’ve stated repeatedly that everything in the ESSA Final Conference Report can be found in the ESSA Final Law. I simply have used the Conference Report due to the ease of eye strain.

However, I want us to first, go back and look at where I pointed out the alignment dangers for special needs, and then see what’s happened in between time.
1) This article traces the support for national and global groups supporting ESSA (at that time what would live on to become ESSA) for special needs, especially at the post-secondary level. As we know, to have post-secondary alignment, you have to have it in place at the secondary and elementary levels, too.
2) You’ll see more CCSS Machine member organizations pushing on-line tutoring for the special needs learners in this article.

3) In 2016, just as elections were heating up, I put together a ‘need to know’ school board articles. This is part Three. It’s where I have several pages ‘called out’ in regards to all the harm ESSA had in store.

What you see below is ESSA’s Page 28. No where did I see the parents as ‘stakeholders’ included in the special needs student team.

essa28

On Page 57, use of IDEA funds are thrown in for those learning English. (*Note: you’ll also find more about this on Pages 159, 161, 162, and, 164 of ESSA):

essa57On Page 150, look at the control and data mining aspects for special needs students:
essa150
Warriors, on Page 151, you’ll find that school leaders, teachers, and related staff will be able to identify, at an early age, which students are most at-risk for not achieving literacy skills due to disabilities. I ask you, is such an important diagnosis to be turned over to educators? This type of diagnosis should be a physician’s or psychologist’s!

Related And Worth Considering:

1) What ‘alternative teacher or teacher training’ will be unleashed on the special needs students (all ages) in your State? I showed you last week how NC’s HB634 will use people from the private sector to fill teacher jobs, especially with SEL (social emotional learning) experience. While these people may possess SOME of the talents to lead, that does NOT make them a ‘teacher’. Given the experience needed by teachers for this student population, how is this the BEST for them? Also, what about the PBIS (Positive Behavior Intervention and Supports), the school counselors? Here, I showed you how students, including special needs are faring in ‘real time’

2)  Grants from The Gates Foundation to National Center for Learning Disabled to support the CCSS Machine’s shift in education.
a) 2016’s Grant (for expanding ESSA activities in targeted States)

b) 2015’s Grant (for ‘personalized learning’ in special needs education. AKA: technology)

3) From the National Center for Learning Disabled, their hype on personalized learning.

4) The (CEC) Center for Exceptional Children’s “Life Centered Education” curriculum. It is used by many special education teachers across America. Time mark 1:08 (video below) shows the CCSS co-relation. This curriculum is data-driven. The curriculum is based off the “School to Work” 1994 Law, according to the Teacher’s Guide. While I cannot share the Teacher’s Guide link with you (copyright infringement), I can point you to where you can access it. (*Note: click on the download button, upper right hand side of the page)

Also from the CEC, is their 2017 Annual Conference Guide. In it, you’ll find workshops for special needs on UDL (Universal Design for Learning) and many other CCSS Machine ties like CCR (College and Career Readiness), STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), RtI (Response to Intervention), and more.

5) From Congress, HR 3199 (in the current session of legislation). It is to amend the HEA (Higher Education Act) for ‘better access’ for special needs students beyond high school and into colleges or trade schools. States will be submitted, yet again, to competitive grants for items like  ‘career pathway’ direction, data mining, and more.

6) From “Child Abuse in the Classroom”, a page dedicated to what some of these systems and programs for mental manipulation actually contain. (*Note: pay attention to the “Child Find” information.)

 

studentdash

 

Closing:

Warriors, to ‘bamboozle’ someone, you mean to confuse them. How horrible is it that the ESSA language and mandates are written to confuse these type of students who already face their own unique set of challenges? How trite of the CCSS Machine to disrespect the parents and guardians of these children in the name of ‘success’.

*Special note: since the publication of the “Captive Education” article, I’ve had new evidence surface for ‘at-risk’ students. Be sure to look out for that article!

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FTF: PreK Research: CCSS, CBE, and a Host of Others

To learn more about PreK research, visit: http://nieer.org/
To learn more about PreK research, visit: http://nieer.org/

As anti CCSS Warriors, we’ve heard of educational research on the K-12 level, the higher education level, but did you know there’s an educational research group for those in pre-kindergarten? I first wrote about the National Institute for Early Education Research and their Zero to Three involvement: 
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/tag/national-institute-for-early-education-research/
While that article will name the same groups below, this time I’m taking a much closer look at each of the lesser known groups involvement into CCSS aligned preschool. What is interesting, is the NIEER is housed in Rutgers University.

 

NIEER’s Mission:

From the website’s ‘mission statement’, The National Institute for Early Education Research (NIEER) conducts and communicates research to support high-quality, effective early childhood education for all young children. Such education enhances their physical, cognitive, and social development, and subsequent success in school and later life.”

As part of the Vision/MIssion of NIEER
NIEER also leads the Center on Enhancing Early Learning Outcomes (CEELO), one of 22 comprehensive centers funded by the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Elementary and Secondary Education to strengthen the capacity of State Education Agencies to lead sustained improvements in early learning opportunities and outcomes.”


Before we get to HOW the NIEER influences early education, I think you might be interested in what groups fund the National Institute for Early Education Research.

From the website the following pro CCSS groups fund the research. Most of these are well known supporters. The ones you may not recognize have links you can follow to learn more:
U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Educational Research and Improvement (OERI)
The Pew Charitable Trusts 
Carnegie Corporation of New York
Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation (CCSS/STEM ties can be proven by the Foundation’s paper: http://www.grdodge.org/fileadmin/Dodge_News/Dodge_Foundation_June_2013_Grants_Announcement.pdf {refer to the education paragraph}
The David and Lucile Packard Foundation
The Prudential Foundation {see my article from “Prevent Common Core”:
http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1154 {Prudential’s CCSS ties will be revealed second in the article}

Other funders are below. Are the ‘other funders’ pro CCSS? Great question. Let’s find out!

The Fund for New Jersey, see their 4/2015 pdf document’s section 3 which details NJ education: NJKids (one of the key components? Extended preK to full day classes)
You can also find the Fund for NJ has granted the Education Law Center money to further strengthen public schools and extend preschools to full days. Find that evidence:
http://www.fundfornj.org/grants-awarded/2015 (The Ed Law Center grant is the 2nd one from the top. There are many other education grants as well which are classified by the organization’s name. To see their CCSS support, use the link: http://www.edlawcenter.org/search-results.html; you can see much about not only preschool expansion, but other education levels as well.) Before we leave the Fund for NJ and its grantee, the Ed Law Center, you might find it interesting that one of the Ed Law Center’s initiatives is for the “Great Schools of NJ”. If you didn’t know it, “Great Schools” is very much CCSS aligned/funded. How do I know? After all the “Great Schools of NJ” is a non-profit organization. The Gates Foundation has funded ‘greatschools.org’ for quite a while. You can find that evidence on both the links below:
http://www.greatschools.org/  and http://www.gatesfoundation.org/How-We-Work/Quick-Links/Grants-Database#q/k=Great%20Schools

The Schumann Fund for New Jersey, before we delve into their ties, I wanted you to see the screen shot below. The latest grant is to an early education program named “Brick”.
“Brick” stands for “Building Responsible Intelligent Creative Kids”.

Grants for Early Education can be found: http://foundationcenter.org/grantmaker/schumann/early_childhood.html
Grants for Early Education can be found:
http://foundationcenter.org/grantmaker/schumann/early_childhood.html

Want to learn more about “Brick”? After all it’s targeting early learners. Be sure to visit:
http://bricknewark.org/curriculum-and-instruction/ (look at the formative assessments, the digital technology that’s been tied to CCSS before)
There are other grants this Foundation you’ll want to investigate. As well. Especially their support of the ‘Grantmakers for Education’ which is tied to  the Fordham Institute, as well as others. To see for yourselves, visit:  http://www.edfunders.org/ (scroll down to see the logo for Fordham) As far as the Grantmakers members list? It’s massive AND very CCSS Machine connected. See all the member organizations:  http://www.edfunders.org/our-community/member-organizations

Smith Richardson Foundation, you can find out more about this Foundation at their website, https://www.srf.org/
That stated, here’s an excerpt about education from their ‘domestic public policy’ page,
In terms of human capital development, the Foundation has been supporting work to identify how schools can become more productive by, for example, increasing the quality of the teacher workforce or adopting more effective curricula.  Because success in the contemporary economy requires individuals to acquire education and training beyond high school, the Foundation is building a portfolio of projects on post-secondary education.”
Among the past grant recipients are the pro CCSS groups: Brookings Institute and  Harvard University (well documented ties to CCSS)
You can also find the the CCSS tied Urban Institute among the Smith Richardson Foundation’s grants.(see their 2010 publication, where they go into detail about early education success for immigrants via CCSS on page 7: 412330-Young-Children-of-Immigrants-and-the-Path-to-Educational-Success) Then, contrast that with their other 2010 publication, http://www.urban.org/sites/default/files/alfresco/publication-pdfs/901345-Will-We-Ever-Learn-What-s-Wrong-With-the-Common-Standards-Project.pdf
Urban’s Board of Directors and you’ll find members from PBS, Bank of American, the University of NC, Harvard University, and MIT.
Each of these groups have support for the CCSS alignment. See the Board:
http://www.urban.org/about/board-of-directors

 The Smith Richardson Foundation has other groups with grants you need to read to believe. You will see a wide variety of educational levels from preschool to GED and everything else in between. Visit their entire ‘education’ grants,
https://www.srf.org/page/1/?s=Education&post_type=grant&s_type=standard#038;post_type=grant&s_type=standard

Tulsa Community Foundation, their website: https://tulsacf.org/  Their ties to early education, CCSS alignment? See below:
tulsaschools

What you see above is from the Coalition for Community Schools. I’ve covered this Coalition in previously published articles. However, I’m including the most relevant one.
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/19/fom-a-new-ccs-coalition-for-community-schools/

To access the Tulsa Community video featured in the screen shot: http://www.communityschools.org/about/early_childhood_education_news.aspx

To access the Coalition’s ‘perfect fit’ article where they connect early education and CCSS:
http://coalitionforcommunityschools.blogspot.com/2012/04/early-childhood-linkages-with-community.html

To see how the current Tulsa CCSS alignment efforts grew from an earlier Tulsa Community Foundation movement, TulsaCommunityFoundation (scroll to the bottom of page 50 and look on the right hand side for “Step Up Tulsa!”)

 

Back to NIEER:

I found buried in their publications and research this document which was presented in the ‘resources’ section of their newsletter detailing the re-authorization of the ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act). This document was published by the National Association of Elementary School Principals (NAESP). The topic? “Making PreK to 3rd Grade Assessments Matter”. You won’t believe what you read. It is full of CBE (competency based education). CBE is a huge portion of not only CCSS, but CTE (Career Tech Education).
To access the document: leading-pre-k-3-learning-communities-executive-summary
You really should look at the entire July 2015 newsletter. Why? You’ll find a global investment summit where the topic was early childhood education; you’ll find a federal budget for early childhood learning; you can find studies, and links galore.
To access the NIEER newsletter: http://nieer.org/publications/online-newsletters/volume-14-issue-14

As far as the NIEER state by state yearbook (the original screen shot of this article), you’ll want to investigate that, too. CCSS is listed in the glossary of abbreviations. You’ll also see Title One funding and TANF funding (Temporary Assistance for Needy Families). I was able to tie abuse of TANF funds by CCSS in the states in my previous article, https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/09/29/ftf-more-tracking-the-workforce-aligned-society/ 
To access the 2014 Yearbook: Yearbook2014_full2_0

Tech Thursday: CTE, CCSS, and Special Needs in Post Secondary Education

Back in December 2014, I first wrote about Common Core, Career and Technical Education and its impact on the Special Needs students. What’s the latest for this population group in Post-Secondary education? Let’s find out in today’s article. Below is the link to the 2014 article:

https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/tech-thursday-career-techcommon-core-and-alternative-education/

Also related to this is the CCSS alignment of IEPs: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/rmt-ccsss-present-to-special-needs/

Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.
Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.

An Education Webinar from June 30th:

Just a couple of days ago, the Gates Foundation backed “Education Week” hosted a free educational webinar about post secondary life for those with special needs. The following information is from links suggested as credible resources during the webinar. Credible for us, the anti CCSS Warriors, means we can use the resources to know where to look to access the CCSS Machine’s grasp for our students with special needs.

Education Week’s article, “Advocates Hope Common Core Will Rub Off” shares this criticism that not enough transitional planning is going on for those with special needs shifting from high school to post secondary education. While that may or may not be true, it’s the source EW used which is skewed towards CCSS/CTE (AIR, American Institutes of Research) offering the criticism. “”Many plans lack depth, breadth, and personalization; have low expectations for students with disabilities; do not include plans for postsecondary education; and do not map out how the K–12 education system should connect to other systems, such as postsecondary, vocational rehabilitation, workforce training, or independent services,” says a 2013 report from the American Institutes for Research. “As a result, many students with disabilities leave high school with amorphous and generic plans that fail to address their individual circumstances or interests.” To access the entire article: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/04/advocates-hope-common-core-will-rub-off.html?intc=EW-DPCT15-TOC

From that 2013 AIR Report (be sure to click on the image to enlarge it):

AIRneeds

To access the 2013 AIR Report: Improving College and Career Readiness for Students with Disabilities

NASDSE, the National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Inc.:

This group based in VA, is supporting the ‘Every Child Achieves Act’ (aka: HR5 as the re-authorization of the NCLB law which in turn gave us Race to the Top and Common Core). Here’s an excerpt from their letter of support to Sen. Lamar Alexander, “NASDSE commends you for including in your bill language that only allows up to one percent of all students – those who have the most significant cognitive disabilities – to take an alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards. This cap is critical to ensuring that students with disabilities will remain on track to graduate from high school prepared for postsecondary education and/or a career. We therefore urge that you oppose any efforts during the bill’s markup that would raise or eliminate this cap.” You can read the entire letter, http://www.nasdse.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=hLXguhdRtoM%3d&tabid=36

Also available from the NASDSE, is a 2004 data collection document which spells out what ADDITIONAL data is collected on each student with special needs. You can read it: SpecNeedsDataCollect

NASDSE has been around since 1938, but its most recent set of goals includes more post secondary success for the students served. Here’s a short paragraph you may find interesting, “The continued collaboration with our key partners, including the National Association of State Title I Directors and the Council of Administrators of Special Education brings us closer to common language in serving and improving outcomes for all students and remains a priority for NASDSE, as is collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs, in order to provide input regarding implementation of the State Systemic Improvement Plans,  Results Driven Accountability and the role of the National Center for Systemic Improvement (NCSI) in providing direct support to our members.”

The Board of Directors are all from various states across America and their Public Instruction departments. AZ, VA, MT, NH, UT, CA, GA, and SD. See: http://www.nasdse.org/AboutNASDSE/BoardofDirectors/tabid/406/Default.aspx (*NOTE; from here you can explore more about the organization via the left hand menu)

If you’re curious about the funding each state receives for educating special needs students, NASDSE and AIR (as in the group above) partnered together back in 2010 and published a report about this topic. See: NASDSEAIR

To find out all the NASDSE’s corporate sponsors and other groups involved: http://www.nasdse.org/ResourceLinks/tabid/59/Default.aspx

Pacer’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment, http://www.pacer.org/transition/:

From their website, “Founded in 1977, PACER Center was created by parents of children and youth with disabilities to help other parents and families facing similar challenges. PACER Center enhances the quality of life and expands opportunities for children, youth, and young adults with all disabilities and their families so each person can reach his or her highest potential. PACER operates on the principles of parents helping parents, supporting families, promoting a safe environment for all children, and working in collaboration with others.” It is a non profit organization based in MN. It is funded by the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Office for Special Education Programs (*NOTE: you can find this fact at the bottom of every page on the website highlighted in blue)

From the Pacer’s 2014 published resources, a ‘new’ way to look at career paths for those students ready to go from high school to post secondary education. Here’s an interesting couple of paragraphs to read. When reading, consider the context of Career Pathways and/or Career and Technical Education (which are CCSS aligned), “To be able to acquire these skills and effectively change jobs, and plan and manage multiple careers over one’s life time, career development skills are important. The process by which youth get to know their strengths and interests, learn how different jobs connect with those interests, and build these career planning and management skills is called career development.” 

“By helping to support youth in making important informed decisions about their future, parents and other caring adults can contribute a great deal to their children’s post-high school success. For youth with disabilities in particular, families often play the very important roles of setting high expectations for youth’s future employment, and of advocating for opportunities for them to identify their strengths and interests and to explore career options. Families who learn about and begin the career development process with their youth early will be better prepared to support them in choosing and building a bright future. “Family” here is defined broadly as adults and children related biologically, emotionally, or legally, including single parents, blended families, unrelated individuals living cooperatively, and partnered couples who live with biological, adopted, and foster children.” The entire document was found on a linked website from the Pacer’s website. The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability (NCWD). To read the NCWD’s entire document, http://www.ncwd-youth.info/node/1463 (*NOTE: The NCWD is part of the Institute for Educational Leadership which is a supported by a grant from the U.S. Dept. of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, ODEP; you can find this information at the bottom of the page when you access the article mentioned directly above. It’s highlighted in blue.)
“Think College!”, http://www.thinkcollege.net/:

From their website, you can find out that  “Think College is a project of the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The Think College initiatives are funded by grants from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, the Office of Special Education Programs, and the Office of Postsecondary Education.”

For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports
For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports

If you’d like to see the CCSS tie between the Standards and Boston College, http://frontrow.bc.edu/program/braun/

For more proof of BC’s CCSS stance:

BostonCollegeccss

Closing:

If you need more evidence of how intrusive the CCSS Machine is being in regard to our families and students with special needs, please let me know. If you have such evidence or wish to provide a real life account of your family’s saga with Career and Tech Education or Common Core, please let me know.