Tag Archives: SHEEO

Tech Thursday: Update on CCSS/CTE for Adults

CCSS,CTE treats any student, regardless of age, like this 'stackable chunk' of conformity.
CCSS,CTE treats any student, regardless of age, like this ‘stackable chunk’ of conformity.

Warriors Against Common Core: how many times have I shared with you that the CCSS Machine seeks to encompass EVERY student..including adults? Young adults, just graduating high school and moving on in life; mid-life adults and/or older adults desiring to go back to work and needing education…you get the idea.

No matter how many times it has been we MUST talk about it more often! Yes, most anti CCSS Warriors are looking out for those who aren’t adults yet..I totally agree. However, with all the evidence out there to shine the light on the adult versions of CCSS, why aren’t more adults standing up and saying ‘NO’!?!? Warriors, we MUST look out for the grinding down of ANY student when it comes to the CCSS Machine!! We MUST protect every citizen from, not only the educational demise of America, but the workforce caste system embedded in CCSS/CTE!

 

A ‘Refresh’ for Your Adult CCSS/CTE Information:

If you are new to the blog, you may of missed one of the first articles I wrote about CCSS/CTE after high school; you may not of seen the CCSS Adult Standards, either. If you’ve been around the blog for a while, you know that every age group is targeted when it comes to CCSS/CTE. You know every educational choice being targeted is a purposed and planned step. New or not, please share the links below so everyone is your anti CCSS circle of influence can be as informed, prepared, and ready to fight this awful takeover of education!
1)  For any student (regardless of where you graduated from) after high school:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/04/common-core-after-high-school-reality-check/
2) For the special needs students after high school:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/07/02/tech-thursday-cte-ccss-and-special-needs-in-post-secondary-education/
3) Perkins Funding (used in post-secondary education) reworked to support CCSS/CTE:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/20/tech-thursday-perkins-gets-the-common-core-squeeze/
3a) Title 9 Funding is also used in post-secondary education & gets the CCSS/CTE makeover:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/30/ftf-more-know-thy-title-9-ccss-and-education/
4) The National Career Path Network:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/08/tech-thursday-national-career-pathways-network/
4a) The American Apprenticeship Initiative is CCSS/CTE/CP (Common Core State Standards, Career Tech Education, Career Pathways aligned and supported in the WIOA (Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014)
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/02/12/tech-thursday-aligned-apprentices/
5) Have you ‘met’ SHEEO (States Higher Education Executive Officers Organization)? If not, you need to see how cozy the organization is with the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers):
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/11/ftf-tuesday-meet-sheeo/
6) Adult textbooks aligned with CCSS/CTE or CCR (college and career readiness):
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/09/01/ftf-ascending-and-aligning/
6a) GED and more adult textbooks:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/08/20/tech-thursday-high-school-equivalency-ccsscte-style/

 

So, What’s New in the Adult CCSS Education Realm?

adultempower
If you need to enlarge the above screen shot, simply click on it. Do you see? More ‘adult learners’! “new math”, and, ‘McGraw Hill Education‘. Good grief! But hold on, anti CCSS/CTE Warriors, there’s more!

From the news release pictured above, “For many people seeking to improve their career prospects, a high school diploma is the first stop on the pathway to prosperity. But an increasing number of adults and adolescents without a high school diploma are struggling to obtain one, according to the latest high school equivalency test data, which shows that fewer and fewer adults taking these assessments pass them. For these individuals, math is proving to be the biggest roadblock of all, with the math portion of most high school equivalency assessments having the lowest pass rate of all subjects.” Now, you may ask why I added emphasis on the ‘pathway to prosperity’. That, my warriors, is a pro CCSS/CTE buzz phrase (or educratic doublespeak) How do I know? Pearson Publishing and Harvard University teamed up to create the Pathways to Prosperity! See this article where you’ll also find ‘national job credentialing! https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/09/03/tech-thursday-just-say-no-to-nocc/

The news release also goes on to tell you of the lagging math scores by adults as based on the research by  ‘Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) for the Programme for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies (PIAAC)If you missed my article about the OECD and the ‘human capital’ ties to CCSS/CTE, https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/09/08/ftf-human-capital-the-new-name-for-citizens/

After the news release shares the USA’s ranking, it goes on to share with you how McG H has a new ‘mathematics program aligned with Career and College Readiness Standards for adult education.’

To see the entire news release: 
http://www.mheducation.com/news-media/press-releases/help-adult-learners-earn-high-school-equivalency-certificates-new-empower-for-math.html


What’s Inside the ‘New’ Math?

McG H Education, has a ‘great’ presentation of each of the new textbooks, both on-line and in print. Listen up for the ‘your country’, the ‘CCRS leveling system’ (College and Career Readiness Standards).

On e of the 'new math' programs for adults..complete with lots of hands on learning activities.
On e of the ‘new math’ programs for adults..complete with lots of hands on learning activities.

New and available this Winter:

newmath2

To access the entire on-line preview of the above and even more CCSS ‘sneak peeks’,
http://www.brainshark.com/mcgraw-hillseg/vu?pi=zHfzetjXpz57VEz0&intk=810014462

To see more about all of this from the McG H Education website, be sure to click on the embedded link in the press release (see above) where you see the phrase ‘new EMPower’

You’ll probably also want to check out the TERC (Technical Education Research Center) and its part in this ‘new math’ for adults. A link to their website in at the bottom of the above news release. Briefly, TERC is a non-profit group. It’s devoted to not only post-secondary education and curriculum development, it’s into STEM as well (Science, Technology, Engineering, and, Math). Among the funding organizations are AIR (American Institutes of Research, The Gates Foundation, the Ford Foundation, the U.S. Dept. of Education, and a host of other groups, schools, and consortia. Find them all:
https://www.terc.edu/pages/viewpage.action?pageId=2392330

*Note, I will be further investigating TERC in a future article, as many of their projects in research and development are geared for reforming education. With as many CCSS Machine members as TERC is either working with or being supported by, we must know more!

 

Closing:

I hope you will share today’s post widely. I trust you will use the information at your local school board meetings or presentations to those in charge of higher education in your states. We simply MUST have more conversations of ALL the levels of CCSS/CTE infiltration!

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FTF: More Evidence for Aligned CCSS Higher Education

Recently I saw where another anti-CCSS warrior posted on an anti-CCSS Facebook page about a Pearson Publishing RTI (Response to Intervention) Scale. Knowing how there’s always more behind the scope of Pearson in regard to Common Core, I went digging and discovered the RTI Action Network. (Their website: http://rtinetwork.org/) Of course, the site is set to be a tool for those with special needs. It’s part of the National Center for Learning Disabilities.

From Florida Against Common Core.
From Florida Against Common Core.

 

RTI: RTI Action Network’s founding partners include the AFT (American Federation of Teachers), the NEA (National Educators Association), as well as others. Most of these I’ve found to support the CCSS. Cisco Foundation also supports the RTI Action Network. Here’s their statement of support for CCSS (Common Core State Standards), “Cisco Borderless Networks solutions for core networking, secure wireless networks, and virtual desktops will help districts in Common Core states to meet the requirements for online assessment for every student in a district.” (see the rest of Cisco’s CCSS brochure: 

http://www.totalcomm.com/mass/ProductInformation/CiscoCommonCoreBrochure.pdf)

Also in the RTI Action Network family are the implementing partners. Among them are also some well-identified CCSS supporters. For example, the Gates funded ASCD (Association for Supervision and Curriculum Development) is among those helping CCSS become entrenched. To see the other implementing partners refer to the website address in the first paragraph. Pearson Publishing’s Clinical Assessment arm is a sponsor of RTI Action Network, too (to access the other sponsors, http://www.rtinetwork.org/about-us/sponsors)

National Center for Learning Disabilities (NCLD): Their website, http://www.ld.org/ , has a tab ‘Advocacy’. You’ll want to access that to see the 4 pages of policy statements the organization has on their stance in education for those with special needs. Among them? Workforce, Career Tech Readiness and Higher Education;  Competency Based Outcomes. (see: http://www.ncld.org/action-center/where-we-stand/?page=3)

What I found a bit interesting is in the NCLD’s mission statement is the purpose of ‘transforming schools’. Where did I find this? In their 2014 “State of Learning Disabilities 2014” Report. It includes all kinds of information. Including not only, Common Core, but, assessments, post-secondary career training, and more. On page 28 of this report you’ll find that those students with learning disabilities are entering community colleges, colleges, universities, vocational technical schools, and other similar schools. Now, knowing that community colleges are aligned or in the process of being aligned to CCSS (in some of my 2014 posts, I reported on how most community colleges in the USA were CC aligned already. I live in NC, where all our community colleges are 100% Common Core aligned), this should be quite alarming. Research has shown the CCSS is not geared to help those with special needs, learning disabilities, or those gifted. Further in the report, on page 35, you’ll find the CCSS component is to speed up the IEP (Individualized Education Plan) Process among other ‘advantages’. Be sure to look for the Longitudinal Study that’s been conducted on those with LD–it’s in the report as well. (see the entire report: 2014-State-of-LD-FINAL-FOR-RELEASE)

Back to the RTI Action Network:

Found on the RTI Action Network’s Resources page, I found the following document, “Common Core State Standards and Teacher Preparation: The Role of Higher Education”  Published by the APLU (Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities), along with the Science and Mathematics Teacher Imperative (SMTI, which is a grant project of the APLU ), and The Leadership Collaborative (TLC, which is a National Science Foundation grant project) Working Group on the Common Core State Standards. Here’s an excerpt of why these 2 groups support higher education CCSS alignment, “Higher education plays multiple roles in ensuring the success of the Common Core State
Standards. In this brief, we lay out an action agenda for the role of higher education institutions in this collective work. Four are noteworthy:
1) Aligning higher education curriculum with K–12 curriculum (which includes both adapting admissions standards and revising curricula of first year courses that act as bridges between K–12 and college majors). What this looks like in reality? “The Common Core State Standards and accompanying assessments will allow teacher preparation programs to identify individuals to recruit in middle and high school, community college teacher pipeline programs, and university-based undergraduate teacher preparation
programs as freshmen.”
2) Preparing and educating teachers, both prospective and practicing (which includes revising curriculum in disciplinary departments to prepare teachers to teach the Common Core, revising professional preparation coursework and experiences, and working in partnerships with professional development programs). What this looks like in reality:
“In particular, an emphasis needs to be placed on the Standards for
Mathematical Practice, described in the CCSS, which paint a very different view of mathematics learning than is common in many content courses for teachers. Just as the CCSS outlines the knowledge and skills that will be expected of K–12 students, we will also need standards for teachers that outline the knowledge of mathematics and sciences that teachers will need in order to effectively teach the CCSS content.”
3) Conducting research on issues of teaching and learning the Common Core State Standards, teacher quality, and the implementation of the Common Core State StandardsWhat’s sad to point out here is that Finn and Petrelli’s 2010 Study about college and career readiness is cited here! The need for assessing teachers, for ensuring they are taught in the ways of CCSS, and other implementation ‘bonuses’.

4) Establishing and sustaining long-term partnerships with other actors and agencies in the educational system.” Those ‘actors’?? Oh, these include state educational departments, state level higher education agencies, and the P through 12th grade schools. “Yet responding to the CCSS will require states to reform teacher certification requirements, and those requirements include the entire university community. Furthermore, work must be done to better align the mathematical preparation of students between P–12 schools and higher education. Thus, it will be important for higher education to build stable, long-term partnerships with state education departments and with P–12 schools that include and extend beyond teacher preparation.”

The ‘Plan of Attack for Higher Education Staff’ includes:

1) Raise awareness of the CCSS with university presidents, provosts, deans and department chairs.
2) Build a coalition of actors to engage the multiple units across disciplinary departments and teacher education departments to consider their responsibility in responding to the CCSS. (more of how to do this will be further detailed in later pages of the report)
3) Build coalitions with higher education institutions across the state to build support for the CCSS, to ensure a commonality of vision, and to develop shared resources for responding to the CCSS.
4) Demonstrate a public commitment to be accountable to the needs faced by K–12 education by the CCSS.
5) Work with Government Relations Offices to communicate institutional support for the CCSS and to garner the resources needed to provide support for implementation efforts

Included will be education task forces, more partnerships, SHEEO, and other CCSS friendly groups. (If you aren’t sure who SHEEO is, see my article, https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/11/ftf-tuesday-meet-sheeo/) There will be a ramping up of STEM (if you think STEM is a safe educational endeavor, please see my eye-opening report about how STEM, CCSS, and a President’s Council (which includes the National Science Foundation’s input) are all impacting our schools as we speak). https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/02/from-the-files-pcast-stem-and-common-core/  There’s also plans for aligned curriculum (remember how we’ve been told repeatedly the CCSS isn’t curriculum, it’s just standards?!)

Here’s the entire report for your perusual: APLU_CCSS_Discussion_Paper

Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities: Their website, http://www.aplu.org/ includes a map of all the qualifying universities (see:http://www.aplu.org/page.aspx?pid=249) , major projects, and news underwritten by the Kellogg Foundation to support higher education reform, complete with ‘partnerships’. If you search their site with “Common Core Standards”, you should get back 660 reports, stories, or tags. Oh, yeah, I almost forgot, APLU has received copious Gates Foundation funding. Click on the picture to enlarge it to see amounts of money.

APLU Gates

So, in closing, as we’ve discovered when it comes to not only Pearson, but of Gates, now SHEEO, and the others mentioned here, the movement to align those with learning disabilities is a long, twisted mess with Common Core thrown right in the middle of it all.

Tech Thursday: College/Career Readiness Success and Common Core

Click to enlarge this wheel.
Click to enlarge this wheel.

CCR, College and Career Readiness:

Hardly a new subject for me to write about, but more Common Core aligned evidence is popping up. Where did I get the above image from? A CCR Success Center!! You, too can visit their website to see just how fabulous of a job your state is doing when it comes to CCSS transitions from high school to college! http://www.ccrscenter.org/

Please first notice who houses this “Success Center”…AIR! (American Institutes for Research) A well known CCSS (Common Core State Standards) supporter, data miner! Funding, you ask? Why, the U.S. Dept. of Education, of course! Others involved ar the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF), Forum for Youth Investment (FYI), National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc), Quill Research Associates, LLC (QR), Achieve, Inc., American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), Campaign for High School Equity (CHSE), Change the Equation (CTEq), Collaborative for Academic, Social,  and Emotional Learning (CASEL), College Board, CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers), IDEA Partnership (includes the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s Office of Special Education Programs), National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE), The National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER), North Carolina New Schools, SHEEO (State Higher Education Executive Officers), and Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship. To read a short description of each and to see how they have a hand in our higher education’s CCSS pot: http://www.ccrscenter.org/about-us/our-partners

Among the organization’s advisors is Dr. David Conley. I hope you took my advice from a couple of days ago and looked into his educational background, current educational philosophies and Common Core participation. You’ll be seeing his name in this post again.

Other things the “Success Center” does for our students:

ccrcontentcentersredo

Helping align our states to Common Core and create ‘success’ are what are called “Content Centers”. There are also “Regional Content Centers”. The Content Centers are run by WestED, AIR, Edvance, Temple University, and the National Institute for Early  Education Research.

Regional Centers have the States divided into the color coded sections you see above. Each group is run by a select few organizations: WestED, SEDL(formerly Southwest Educational Development Laboratory), ICF International, University of Oklahoma, Educational Testing Service, AIR, Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning, RMC Research, Education Northwest, and the Pacific Resources for Education and Learning. So just what will I find for the state I live in? Plenty! Since you all know I live in NC, the first thing I noticed is the group of states with NC are in the “Southeast Comprehensive Center”, but I see SEDL (seen above). So my first question is “Why, when I don’t live in the Southwest, is North Carolina overseen by this group?”

Guess I have to click on the Southeast Group to find out. So, I do. I see lots of vivid colors, I see a smiling face of a lovely lady..then I see below her smile, these words, “she focuses on curriculum and instruction, particularly the Common Core State Standards, effective literacy practices, early childhood education, and professional development to improve literacy outcomes in districts and schools.” This lady is considered an expert. However, there are many other experts whom I found. Each with what their areas of expertise are and how it’s devoted to the CCSS.  I click on the tab with my state’s name and instantly see 10 current Common Core projects going on!! It was curious for me when I saw the words “Past Projects”, so I found the tab for that, clicked and was appalled! CCSS projects, one after another.. From 2005 to 2012! Current projects range from early childhood education, to community wide readiness, to videos for math and English. I go on to discover the Southeast Center is developing a CoP (Community of Practice) with the neighboring states also included in our Grouping. Take a look at all that will be shared: http://secc.sedl.org/resources/community_of_practice/cop_resources.php  

So what are the neighboring states up to? Well, according to this SE Center, Alabama’s getting the college/career readiness standards, Georgia’s getting the Career Tech Standards, South Carolina is assessing teachers, and Mississippi is getting the little learners ready for school success. Lovely, just lovely.

What I don’t see on this particular website, is where in NC, the office is located. Hhmmm..where can I find that? By going to the other SEDL Center…Texas! Once there I see that each of the Southeast states do indeed have contact information. NC’s is out on the Coast. (hint: if you are curious, look under the ‘contacts’ on the SEDL’s main site)

More ‘successes’:

Since our original intent for Thursdays is to expose Common Core beyond high school, let’s look at other post secondary ‘college/career readiness success’ resources.

Lumina Foundation’s publication from 2013 “A Path to Alignment: Connecting K-12 and Higher Education via the Common Core and Degree Qualifications Profile”. Authors are Dr. Conley (Educational Improvement Policy)  and Dr. Gaston (Kent University). According the the “Executive Summary” of the paper, ‘The heart of the white paper lies in sections 5 and 6, which provide a crosswalk between the CCSS and the DQP. These sections show how alignments and differences between the two may point to a comprehensive preparedness strategy. They also offer a proposal for a multifaceted strategy to realize
the potential synergy of the CCSS and the DQP for the benefit of high school and college educators and their students — and the nation.”  Here’s the entire report: A_path_to_alignment

Achieve, Inc’s “Common Core State Standards and Career Technical Education: Bridging the Divide Between College and Career Readiness” study is also featured as a key resource. Like the Lumina publication above, the CCR Success Center wants to help you know, they are ‘all in’ to the success of Common Core alignment for your students. Now, I’ve written about this particular study before, so I know it’s loaded with tons of information you can use to inform legislators, school boards, and others who are convinced post high school CCSS is a myth.

The study was published in 2012, has the details on the CCSS/CTE/CCR teams that were formed. Here’s an excerpt from the “Executive Summary”, “Common Core State Standards & Career and Technical Education: Bridging the Divide between College and Career Readiness aims to provide guidance to state education leaders about how they can maximize the opportunity to better align academics and CTE through the implementation of the new CCSS by:

» Summarizing what state leaders are currently doing to integrate the CCSS and CTE;
» Providing specific strategies and supporting examples of what particular states are doing and 

» Identifying common barriers and challenges that state leaders face.”

The study will also reveal how the Perkins Act is the main federal funding source for CTE (Career Tech Education) and how the CCSS is taking advantage of this. Here’s another excerpt you’ll find eye-opening: “To establish a reference point on the current level
of CTE involvement in CCSS implementation, Achieve and the Meeder Consulting Group
developed a survey for state CTE directors and state CCSS coordinators to take collectively. The survey was implemented during a two-week window in November 2011. Drawing from the survey findings, eight states were selected for more in-depth interviews: California, Illinois, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio and Oregon.
The purpose of the survey was to determine how state education agencies are including CTE leaders as stakeholders or partners in their CCSS implementation efforts.”

You’ll especially like that the study includes CCSS being written into CTE curriculum (see page 13, where Chapter 4 begins). Page 19 shares how CCSS/CTE align teachers were brought into the mix. Chapter 8, begins on page 22, and expressly details the alignment of post secondary education with Common Core, “To represent true college and career readiness, postsecondary administrators and faculty from the core academic disciplines and technical areas should be aware of and involved in implementation of the CCSS. Postsecondary CTE faculty can provide information about the kinds of literacy and
math skills that will be necessary for students to succeed in their postsecondary CTE programs. Technical colleges are particularly important in these efforts given their role in delivering CTE at the postsecondary level. If secondary CTE educators are reluctant to embrace the CCSS, then this kind of input from postsecondary CTE faculty can reinforce the case for strengthening literacy and math in CTE programs.” See the rest: http://www.achieve.org/files/CCSS-CTE-BridgingtheDivide.pdf

A video: 

From the CCR Success Center’s You Tube Channel (where you’ll find several CCSS/CCR/CTE webinars), here’s the one from the National  High School Center back in 2013.

Closing:

I hope you have really found some very useful information in the last 3  posts. Each one has involved SHEEO, CCSSO, AIR, and the U.S. Dept. of Ed. The articles have been designed to be a one, two, and three punch in the face of the CCSS Machine. If you like, think of it in the ‘3 Strikes’ analogy. However you think about it, realize because each of these Three posts, ALL educational choices are involved. How? Because no matter what choice you’ve made for education in preK to 12th, we all have post secondary opportunities that are either publicly or privately funded. Some use both types of funding. It is becoming almost impossible to find a post secondary school NOT embracing either Common Core, Career Tech Common Core, College/Career Readiness or a combination of any of these. Remember, STEM is also woven into this mix, so the net that’s been cast over a our nation, has certainly gotten even wider than we first knew.

FTF Tuesday: Meet SHEEO

We all love a great discovery, don’t we? Especially in finding out about how far and wide the net is cast across our nation when it comes to Common Core. Today, you won’t be disappointed. We’re going to be finding out about SHEEO, The States Higher Education Executive Officers Organization. They are regular partners with the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers) and the U.S. Dept. of Education. We know so much already about the USDofEd, CCSSO, we’ll be homing in on this ‘new’ organization.

SHEEO, partner of The CCSSO and others:

(www.sheeo.org) According to the website the organization has been around since 1954. Among its purposes, it serves the member states via their higher educational systems, helping shape education policies, and being a liaison between states and the federal government. Currently, there are 55 members from many different states and Puerto Rico. The Executive President is the Executive Director for the Higher Education System in Alabama, Gregory Fitch. Be sure to discover who represents your state. My SHEEO representative is the President of the University of North Carolina, Thomas Ross. We have 17 campuses across our state. As a parent of a student at one of the UNC member schools, I’m not surprised to discover the link, but it is proof, that none of us are ‘safe’ from the overreach of CCSS. (Common Core State Standards)
*Note: You’ll want to especially look at the SHEEO members from the states which didn’t ‘adopt’ the Common Core, like Alaska or Texas. Why? Because, as I’ve written extensively about, the College and Career Readiness, the Adult Common Core will be in post secondary (aka higher education) institutions. This encompasses community colleges and on-line learning as well.

Partners of SHEEO include the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers), the College and Career Readiness Project, and the National Center for Educational Statistics. There are other partners you’ll want to investigate as well.

Current Projects:

1) College and Career Readiness Partnership (CCRP). Here’s an excerpt that you MUST read and share, “In December 2010, three national education leadership associations—the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), and the State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO)—joined in a College and Career Readiness Partnership (CCRP) to promote broad implementation of new Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in mathematics and English Language Arts (ELA). Through its combined network of leaders, the CCRP works collaboratively to address those issues that reside at the intersection of the PK-12 and higher education systems. Primarily, this includes addressing what is needed for successful utilization of the CCSS and common assessments of student achievement, both to improve college readiness in PK-12 and to make effective use of these assessments for placement and other decisions in postsecondary education.”    In June 2011, the CCRP staff worked with the Steering Committee to select a first Cohort of seven states—Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Oregon, Tennessee, Wisconsin—to work closely with the Partnership through State Leadership Teams on the statewide goal of effective, cross-sector, Common Core implementation.” The following excerpt is from the AASCU’s announcement, “The Phase II timeline is October 2012 – December 2013. Missouri, Oregon, Wisconsin will continue as Cohort 1 of Phase II and five new states will be invited to join as Cohort 2 for Phase II.” According to the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Lumina Foundation and the Hewlett Foundation fund the entire Project. Both are well known CCSS supporters.  This organization has its own set of CCR initiatives going. If you can access a copy of their published “Serving America’s Future: Increasing College Readiness”, you can find out more. Unlike the other files I share on Tuesdays, this one isn’t free. In fact it is $30.00. You can access for free the “Executive Summary” of the detailed report,     http://www.aascu.org/CollegeReadiness/ExecutiveSummary/   

*Note: While at the AASCU website, be sure to check out their member states, schools. Be sure to look at the territories and international locations included.

To find out more about the CCRP, Defining_College_Career_Readiness Be sure to remember, states which do not ‘adopt’ CCSS, do indeed have ties to this project. For example, Texas has “Project Share”. Also, research the paper’s author. You’ll be glad you did.

Somewhat related: This excerpt is from 2009, that I found on-line, “There is a new effort coming under way which I will be involved with and documenting closely to set data standards in the country. This is being done in partnership between USED, CCSSO, SHEEO”   

To read the rest of the 2009 information,  ( http://thejackl.org/tag/sif-pesc-duncan-used-gates-ccsso-sheeo/)

2) MSC, Multi State Collaborative to Advance Learning Outcomes Assessment. “The MSC is designed to produce valid data summarizing faculty judgments of students’ own work, and also seeks to aggregate results in a way that allows for benchmarking across institutions and states. The primary goal of the initiative is to provide assessment data that will allow faculty and institution leaders to assess—and improve—the levels of student achievement on a set of cross-cutting outcomes important for all disciplines. With the active support of the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association (SHEEO) and the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), nine states—Connecticut, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Utah—agreed to collaborate in the development and pilot testing of a different model for learning outcomes assessment—a model that is rooted in campus/system collaboration, in authentic student work, and in faculty curriculum development and teaching activity. The project builds on efforts in Massachusetts (as part of its Vision Project) and builds on the AAC&U LEAP initiative through which it developed a common set of rubrics—VALUE Rubrics—to assess the LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes.” Below is a graphic you’ll want to notice in detail, so click to enlarge it.

Student data, shared with Labor.
Student data, shared with Labor.

To check our your state’s data sharing: http://www.sheeo.org/resources/publications/strong-foundations-state-state-postsecondary-data-systems-2012-update-data

3) Lumina, SHEEO and your state’s funding:

This project is known as “Moving the Needle”. “The State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO) association supports the Lumina Foundation’s push to reach a 60% college attainment rate in the United States by moving from an access agenda to a focus on both access and success. As the membership organization for the state-level governing and coordinating boards of higher education, SHEEO is focused on state-level policy and the role(s) the states can play to reach the goals of the completion agenda. As such, SHEEO is uniquely positioned to understand and consider the varying state contexts that our members operate within and use this knowledge to evaluate state policy recommendations related to college affordability.”

To read more about this,  Moving_the_Needle_041414

4) Common Education Data Standards (CEDS), this project works with AIR (Association for Institutional Research), WICHE (Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education) which is funded by the Gates Foundation, and the Postsecondary Electronic Standards Council. There are other partners as well, so be sure to check them out. CEDS began in 2009. To learn more about just what is ‘common’ and what isn’t, http://www.airweb.org/EducationAndEvents/IPEDSTraining/AdditionalResources/Pages/CEDS.aspx

From the PESC (Postsecondary Electronic Standards Council), this is a list of which organizations are involved in CEDS:

The CEDS User Group participants include representatives from:

  • AcademyOne
  • ACT
  • AEM Corporation
  • Brandon University
  • California School Information Service (CSIS)
  • Choice P20 Solutions
  • College Board
  • College Source
  • Colorado Community College System
  • Ed-Fi
  • Ellucian
  • eScholar
  • Florida International University
  • Georgetown University
  • Hobsons
  • IBM
  • Jenzabar
  • McGraw-Hill
  • Michigan Department of Education
  • National Association of Student Loan Administrators (NASLA)
  • National Student Clearinghouse
  • Naviance
  • North Dakota Department of Education
  • Ontario Universities’ Application Centre (OUAC)
  • Oracle
  • Parchment
  • Perceptive Software
  • QIP
  • Questionmark
  • Rapid Insight
  • RTI
  • SCRIP-SAFE International
  • SIF Association
  • State Education Technology Directors Association (SETDA)
  • State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO)
  • Triadvocates
  • Turning Technologies
  • USA Funds
  • US Department of Education, Office of Under Secretary

The current Co-Chairs of the CEDS User Group are:

  • Hans L’Orange, Vice President for Research and Information Resources, SHEEO
  • *Tony Romano, Director of Information Technology, National Student Clearinghouse

To see even more about student data collection: http://www.pesc.org/interior.php?page_id=208 When you visit this page, be sure to notice the banners that flash up at the top. Don’t miss the one about collaborating for the students greater good.

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