Tag Archives: private education

Great Fallacies Abound

Anti Fed Ed Warriors, what would you do if your State began an ‘ad’ campaign designed around ‘in-your-face’ fallacies? What if those fallacies centered on education?
Would you tell someone?

If you’re like me, you’ll do your best to share what you saw to help others know what to look for as well. The fallacies I’m about to share are SO deep, I’m even going to dust off my “Fib-o-Meter”!!
*For those new and fairly new to my blog, my “Fib-o-Meter” was a weekly Friday feature when I first began blogging. It was in those articles I would take what was being passed off as ‘truth’ and expose the fibs and fallacies.

fibmaster

Warriors, we’ve reached another phase of the CCSS Machine’s education reform BS, that separating truth from hype is definitely needed again.

First Up, NC’s Education “Facts”:

Warriors, look below at the ‘suggested page’ Facebook offered me to ‘like’.

bestnc

Warriors, look at the ‘in-your-face’ fallacies! In less than 30 words, this simple picture and it’s teaser spell out 2 fallacies.

Second, Enter “Fib-o-Meter”:

For this one small ‘ad’, the “Fib-o-Meter” rates its use of  ‘facts’ as the first ‘Total Fallacy”.

The ‘facts’ are all subjective in content! How do I know? First, no State, especially NC has ditched Common Core. No State, including NC has said “Not on my watch!” to all that is connected to Common Core! No State, including NC has escaped (nor will it) the federal overreaches into our schools of ALL choices thanks to ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act). NC has done what every other State has done, re-branded Common Core.

The next Fib-o-Meter” rating goes to ‘cradle to career’. This overused and meaningless phrase has been used as “Total Truth” by the anti CCSS (now Fed Ed) Warriors for years. “Cradle to career” is also part of the tag line for Strive Together (a big CCSS Machine member). Strive Together encompasses entire communities with the ‘cradle to career’ agenda. In NC, Forsyth County is one such center of alignment.

cradlecareer
An aligned collective community?!

Where Warriors have used the ‘cradle to career’ phrase to expose the ‘one-way-to-learn’ for OBE/CBE (outcome based education/competency based education) workforce trained students; the CCSS Machine uses it as a selling point.

Third, ‘Hype NC’:

Warriors, North Carolina (NC) has some great folks and great places. The State level government has also spent many taxpayer dollars coming up with all kinds of ‘feel good’ slogans to entice people and businesses to move here. For example, if you want really good, locally grown food, look for the “Goodness Grows in NC” label. Another label you can find for locally made consumer goods is “It’s Got To Be NC”. I’ll admit, the name “BEST NC” ranks right up there with something which sounds great. We’ll look into what is behind the catchy slogan in a few minutes.

However catchy (or not) a slogan or name is, look at NC’s State level education entities. Between the NC DPI (Dept. of Public Instruction) and the NC SBE (State Board of Education) you’ll not find slogans so much as you will CCSS reform agenda-driven vision statements. You’ve seen these in your States, too. The ones which sound ‘super’, but are ‘in-your-face’ with an ugly reality lurking behind the words.

newncwork

For example, here’s the NC SBE’s vision for education:
“Every public school student will graduate ready for post secondary  education and work, prepared to be a globally engaged and productive citizen.” Warriors, look at the picture directly above. That is the SBE’s vision in reality being carried out in the NC DPI.

Since the CCSS Machine impacts all other school choices in addition to public schools, you won’t have to look to hard to spot how ‘hidden’ the alignment is. For example, the Dept. of Non-Public Education (housed in the NC Dept. of Administration) is set aside for home education as well as private education. However, visit the home education information and there sits the NC Public School graduation requirements should your student wish to attend a NC public college.

What’s more is that the website directs you to the NC SBE if you have more questions. This is followed by a note to parents that states your local school boards usually require additional graduation parameters. Warriors, the reason parents choose home education is to be FREE of the public system!

Fourth, “BEST NC”:

Warriors, “BEST” stands for ‘Business for Educational Success and Transformation’.
No need to ponder their agenda, is there? Look below and see how ‘in-your-face’ their design for education in NC is:

bestncvision
Warriors, below is BEST NC’s ‘Core Values’ page. Added emphasis is mine.

bestdoor.jpg

Thanks to ESSA’s mandates for MORE P3s (public-private partnerships) in education, we’ll see groups like BEST NC increase their choke-hold in our educational systems.

Remember, Warriors, part of the CCSS Machine corporate plan is to squeeze out parents and teachers altogether. 

If you’d like to  see how the priorities from BEST NC will be carried out, visit their page.

If you wish to view the BEST NC hype video for leading the nation in great education, it’s below. Listen for the buzzwords of the CCSS Machine, like ‘personalized learning’.

If you wish to read the BEST NC 75 page “Facts and Figures” Report, you can find it here. You’ll find CTE (Career Tech Education, the adult version of Common Core), STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and, Math), ACT assessments, WorkKeys (pigeonholing assessment for career tracks), and so much more CCSS Machine evidence to support one goal:

                                    “the future of our state’s economy is inseparable
                                     from the quality of our education.”

Closing:

In my next article, I’ll be highlighting an upcoming NC conference dedicated to professional development for teachers and tons of CCSS Machine agenda for communities across the State. While many of you do not live in NC, you can use what I’ve found as evidence it can be found in your State. Maybe by a different name, but the agenda is all the same across America.

shore2

 

 

 

Advertisements

RMT: New Education?

When did 'reinventing education' become code for Common Core?
When did ‘reinventing education’ become code for Common Core?

I don’t know about you, but being the researcher on Common Core Standards that I’ve become, I get quite a bit of email. So, imagine my surprise when I received the following excerpt, “Join us for this two-day opportunity to connect and collaborate with colleagues from the school, library, museum, and home learning worlds–and anyone interested in reinventing how we think about and facilitate learning.” After this there was the usual kind of details one expects when you get an invitation. Of course, at the bottom of the email are the links to learn more about those who are presenting and have provided resources before hand. One of those links will serve as our Riddle on this “Riddle Me This” Sunday. Will it lead us to Common Core? Let’s find out!

“What IF?…”

The riddle above (at least for the conference I was receiving this invitation to) was completed by the phrase “360 Learning” So the entire ‘riddle’ would read “What IF…? 360 Learning”. The main goal of the conference..ahh, my anti CCSS friends, why according to this invitation, it’s ‘reinventing education’!

“What If…360?”:

Website: http://www.whatif360.com/

The main feeling of the organization appears to be major change makers. Now, in certain situations, changes are fine, BUT with all the current ‘reinventing of education’ going on, I’m not sold that this organization’s any different. So, let’s continue dig into them, shall we?

Their philosophy in the classrooms for K-12: “Effective education relies on student-centered approaches and blurring the lines between learner and educator.”

Their philosophy in the classrooms for post-secondary: “encouraging people to take a more liberal arts approach to life into a movement empowering a global community to share their ideas, create networks of communication, and collaborate in designing actions.”

Pardon me, but does any of this sound the least bit familiar to CCSS?

Staffers and their ties to Common Core?

According to 360’s website 3 smiling faces comprise the staff. Here’s what I was able to find on them. (to see the staff’s 360 stuff: http://www.whatif360.com/about/ (scroll to the bottom)

The leaders of 360, reformers for education..especially CCSS style.
The leaders of 360, reformers for education..especially CCSS style.

Felicia Rateliff is 360’s ‘woman behind the curtain’. Her Common Core past, thanks to Linkedin features her work in MO for pushing for CTE (Career Tech Education) via Perkins Funding. She also spent 7 years writing CTE Curriculum (I’ve published several posts about CTE and the Common Core post secondary ties). (to see Ms. Rateliff’s CC past, https://www.linkedin.com/in/feliciarateliff)

Matthew Murrie is 360’s ‘leader of doers’. His CC present includes ‘edupreneurship’. If you’d like to see all the others interested in ‘edupreneurship’, head to Twitter and search for the term. You’ll be ‘pleased’ to know that Common Core Ed Tech is a big follower. (see: https://twitter.com/hashtag/Edupreneurship?src=hash) You can also see Mr. Murrie’s Huffington Post “What If?” entry: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/matt-murrie/what-if-we-embraced-edupr_b_3342677.html *Note his shout out to the global initiatives and education.

Audrey Bellis is 360’s ‘program developer’. Her CC involvement includes advocating for STEM to STEaM reform. (see: http://community.good.is/steam) *Note: if you’ve not heard about the STEM to STEaM education reform, stay tuned.  I can tell you the ties between CCSS, STEM and STEaM are no accident. If you didn’t know  STEM is the main point and CCSS is the vehicle, with STEaM as an add-on, then be sure to see the post I wrote back in late 2014 called “PCAST, STEM and Common Core”. 

Their promo video: 

As you watch this short clip, consider asking ‘what if’? NOW knowing how supportive their work is towards CCSS.

Others Involved:

The 360 group isn’t the only one who will be at the conference I was invited to. There are at least 2 others. One is titled “Reinventing Learning”, the other “The Learning Revolution”.

Links: http://learningrevolution.com/  (hosts on-line/in-person education events) *Note: between the partners and sponsors, plenty of CC backers, funders, and profit makers.

http://www.reinventing.education/   (companion site for all the conferences with the ‘reinvent ed’ theme)

Closing:

Well, I think the answer to our riddle today has been fairly easy to discover, do you?
Here’s a riddle I’d like to pose to all those who are so bent on re-imagining education via CCSS…What say we go away from illegally crafted, developmentally inappropriate education and get serious about the people involved instead of the nebulous cloud of global good?

Sic’ ‘Em Saturday: CCSS in Christian Schools, Even More!

In Yesterday’s Fib-o-Meter Friday post, there was quite a reaction to the revelation about CCSS in more ways than we’re being told about showing up in Christian private schools. After the mountain of responses I received, there was one from a mid west state (OK) who asked if I could help her get her family’s struggle out to others.

A fed up Mom from OK has a CCSS story to share, do you?
A fed up Mom from OK has a CCSS story to share, do you?

The Mom:

(names have been changed for privacy’s sake) Bobbie has an ” 8 year old” student who attends a private Christian school in a large city within Oklahoma. Here are Bobbie’s words about the teachers views in regards to WHAT they teach:

Insist they don’t use common core and told me it is their duty to teach my 8 year old about “difficult social subjects like drinking, drunk parents, drugs, and curse words!” This was after I found my 8 year old with an assigned book that had an alcoholic mother who abandoned her child, curse words, descriptions of several types of alcohol, and name calling.” 

Bobbie’s Fight So Far:

Here’s what Bobbie asked I share with others wanting to fight CCSS in Christian private schools, “I raised heck….It has been so frustrating.” Bobbie has also seen books assigned to her 8 year old about alternative lifestyles. Like many parents, the alternative lifestyles aren’t so much the issue as to WHEN they are taught, HOW they are taught, and by WHOM they are taught!! Parents, like Bobbie, who’ve shared similar experiences have echoed this many times over! Why are the school leaders NOT listening? Another part of Bobbie’s fight you need to know, “I specifically told them that they did not have my permission to enlighten my daughter about sex, drugs, etc and can not believe what I’m reading!” Here’s what else Bobbie noted about teachers, ” they let the 3rd graders have a free for all with the 7th grade books apparently. I know 2 inappropriate books went out the door at least and I know from experience that I am the only 1 of 19 parents that even pay attention to what comes home.”
One of the books Bobbie shared with me her 8 year old had to read is Judy Blume’s “Just As Long as We’re Together”. Here’s a screen shot Bobbie sent me.

According to my OK friend, Bobbie, this is from page 228. Plenty more references to making out, being called a 'slut', and other inappropriate things for an 8 year old.
According to my OK friend, Bobbie, this is from page 228. Plenty more references to making out, being called a ‘slut’, and other inappropriate things for an 8 year old.

Oklahoma’s Private School Stance:

Believe it or not, I have a 2009 U.S. Dept. of Education pdf file that details  each of the 50 states private school regulations. Here’s an excerpt from the Introduction, “State Regulation of Private Schools provides a brief description for each state of state legal requirements that apply to K–12 private schools in the United States. This document is intended to serve as a reference for public and nonpublic school officials, state policymakers, researchers, and others. This report is an update of the 2000 publication by the Office of Non-Public Education (ONPE), State Regulation of Private Schools, which in turn was an update of the 1993 publication by the (then) Office of Private Education, The Regulation of Private Schools in America: A State by State Analysis.” 

According to the Report, here are the topics each state has legal jurisdiction over: “Accreditation/Registration/Licensing/Approval, Teacher Certification, Length of School Year/Days, Curriculum, Recordkeeping/Reports, Health and Safety Requirements, Transportation, Textbooks, Testing, Special Education, Nursing and Health, Technology, Professional Development, Reimbursement for Performing State/Local Functions, Tax Exemption, Public Aid for Private Education, Homeschooling, and Information Resources.”

 Now, for Bobbie’s sake, and parents who are like her in OK, you will need to access the document and turn to page 226 to begin OK’s policy. Here’s what the Report says for Accreditation, “For accreditation, private and parochial schools must comply with the standards prescribed for public schools and members of the faculty must hold state certificates as required of teachers in public schools. Okla. Stat. Title 70, §3- 104.” Now, since it’s 6 years later, I wanted to see if the State Statute has been updated since this Report. Here’s what the latest one I could find says about private schools in OK, “Private and parochial schools may be accredited and classified in like manner as public schools or, if an accrediting association is approved by the State Board of Education, by procedures established by the  State Board of Education to accept accreditation by such accrediting  association, if application is made to the State Board of Education  for such accrediting;” (to see the entire OK Education General Statute, http://oklegal.onenet.net/oklegal-cgi/get_statute?99/Title.70/70-3-104.html)

So, this leads us to wonder just which organizations accredit private schools there. So, let’s see if we can find out. (If you haven’t read Friday’s post, I share with you how to get to those organizations which hold our private schools, especially the Christian ones, accountable.)

Before we answer THAT question, however, let’s FINISH up what the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s 2009 Report stated about the REST of accrediting schools. “No requirements for registration, licensing, or approval.” Further down, any private school teacher must be certified for private schools which are accredited. There’s more under the Length of the School Day..like this, “A school day shall consist of not less than six hours devoted to school activities, except that a school day for nursery, early childhood education, kindergarten, extended day program, and alternative education programs shall be as otherwise defined by law or as defined by the State Board of Education.” 

Bobbie, I wish that were all, but look at this about those internet based programs your 8 year old is more than likely using, “Each district board of education shall adopt policies and procedures that conform to rules for Internet-based courses as adopted by the State Board. Such policies shall include criteria for approval of the course, the appropriateness of the course for a particular student, authorization for full-time students to enroll in Internet-based courses, and establishing fees or charges. No district shall be liable for payment of any fees or charges for any Internet-based course for a student who has not complied with the district‘s policies and procedures. Districts shall require students enrolled in Internet-based courses to participate in the Oklahoma School Testing Program Act. Students participating in Internet-based courses from a remote site will be responsible for providing their own equipment and Internet access, unless the district chooses to provide the equipment. Credit may not be granted for such courses except upon approval of the State Board of Education and the district board of education.” 

Here’s where it gets interesting..Curriculum! According to this Report from 2009, “The Oklahoma Heritage Association coordinates annual observance of “Oklahoma Heritage Week” and includes parochial schools in its efforts….Proprietors of private and parochial schools have a duty to display the flag of the United States of America… As a condition of receiving accreditation from the State Board of Education, all students in grades nine through twelve shall enroll in a minimum of six periods, or the equivalent in block scheduling, of rigorous academic or rigorous vocational courses each day, which may include arts, vocal and instrumental music, speech classes, and physical education classes.”

To see the entire 2009 Report for all the States, http://www2.ed.gov/admins/comm/choice/regprivschl/regprivschl.pdf

Now, back to the question we’ve yet to answer: Which organizations hold the accreditation reins in OK??

NAIS (National Association of Independent Schools):

http://www.nais.org/Articles/Pages/Commission-on-Accreditation.aspx, once on this page, be sure to click on the “Model Core Standards” highlighted words. Here’s an excerpt of what you’ll get, “Model Core Standards are those which define the culture of independent schools and relate directly to the first of the Criteria for Effective Accreditation. While they do not serve as a template, these standards reflect the core elements of our schools and their operation and should be represented in some form in a regional or state association’s accreditation instrument. ” Okay, sounds ‘innocent’, but let’s look a bit deeper, shall we?

If you type in the general search bar “CCSS” you’ll get over 4 pages of information the NAIS has on the Standards, from assessments to resources, and more. (see:  http://www.nais.org/Search/Pages/Results.aspx?k=common%20core%20state%20standards) Here’s a screen shot for you, Bobbie (it’s from the NAIS 2014 published Annual Report for fiscal year ending 2013).

NAISsupporter

To see the entire Annual Report, NAIS_AR2012-13_4web

OPSAC: (Oklahoma Private School Accreditation Association Consortium)

Website: http://opsac.org/

This Consortium assists the OK State Board of Education. Here’s an excerpt about HOW they assist, “Any private school that is accredited by an OPSAC-recognized accrediting association is recognized by the State Department of Education as an accredited school. This acknowledgment of accreditation ensures that students are able to transfer between public and private schools and that the service of state certified teachers in accredited private schools is recognized by the state. The intent is that all privileges extended to state accredited private schools be also extended to private schools accredited by OPSAC-recognized accrediting agencies.” Now, the website does say the schools aren’t expected to give up what makes them unique. (see: http://opsac.org/about-opsac)  Since the OK State Board of Education is the one group which began the OPSAC (1995), it won’t have an annual statement that I could find. It won’t necessarily have corporate partners either. BUT as an entity of the State Board of Education, it should have reports to the OK state legislative body. FIND those, Bobbie! See if you can connect the dots from there to those who support the Common Core. I can tell you by looking at the main web page for the State Board, the one ‘smoking gun’ is SREB (South Regional Education Board). Here are 2 articles I’ve written exposing all the CCSS alignment from SREB.
See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/10/fridays-post-breaking-news-you-need-to-know/  AND
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/07/wybi-wednesday-icaps-common-core-and-more/

Lastly, just by having College Board as one of the government funded CCSS supporters involved, would be a HUGE indication that those private school in OK would have more entrenchment than you can shake a stick to, Bobbie. Where did I find that? On the Independent Schools Association’s website, http://www.isasw.org/about-isas/affiliations/index.aspx

Closing/ Action Steps:

To step up the fight in OK, or any other state you’re suspecting the private schools have aligned more so than they are admitting to OR to have them respect your rights as a parent, try these steps.
1) Request Freedom of Information Act Requests and be diligent in pursuing receiving them! It’s ‘strange’ how many FOIAs get ‘lost’.

2) IF there are corporate sponsors, know which ones, where they are tied in to education (these are called P3, public, private partnerships). Are they members of the Business Round Table or the State’s Chamber of Commerce Common Core Coalition?

3) IF the group you’re researching is part of the State level government, there should be accessible documents to the citizens. Search the archives for the General Assembly (or whatever your State Senators and House of Representatives call themselves).


	

FTF Tuesday: Clarity for Sale! Aligned to Common Core for ‘free’!

For “From the Files” Tuesday, we’re going to look at an educational management company called “Clarion Council”. The entire name is “Clarion Council for Education Greatness, Inc.” according to its website(http://www.clarioncouncil.com/) . So, where’s the Common Core? Keep reading, my friends.

Just what is “Clarion Council”?:

From the name, it does sound impressive. I mean, who doesn’t desire clarity in today’s education mess? I found words like this on the website, ‘bold action’, ‘improve education outcome’, clear’, ‘compelling’. If I’m searching for some ray of hope in today’s education market, this sounds interesting, right? Hold on to that thought.

Before we look up much closer at Clarion (for short), let’s look at what they are. Clarion Council  is what is known as an EMO (Educational Management Organization). So what exactly is an EMO? Here’s a definition (according to DegreeDirectory.org) “Educational management professionals can also be found working in governmental agencies, private companies, and not-for-profit organizations. Those working in educational management might act as policy-makers, researchers, or consultants to help evaluate and develop ways to enrich and enhance the educational system at all levels. Most educational management professionals have earned at least a master’s degree and many are licensed teachers or principals.”

So, my charter school has to use an EMO? No! For example, where I live (NC) the following excerpt is about EMOs:

“A charter school board may choose to contract with a vendor or company, such as an educational
management organization (EMO), to perform certain services in connection with the operation of the
charter school.” (from a NC DPI (Dept. of Public Instruction) letter dated 8/2014 concerning charter schools compliance with public records)
Now that we know this, we can better answer who Clarion is. When you visit the website, you’ll get some information, but not a tremendous amount. I can tell you from looking as closely as I can at the website, you can expect Common Core aligned character education, teacher incentives (the better the student score is to how well you are paid) and school leadership opportunities that are nebulous in description, yet you are to feel assured whatever leadership it is, it will be great. I can tell you that when I tried to find the on-line leadership training, I was blocked because I didn’t have an account. I did see “iLearn” as their on-line choice for instruction. (see more about iLearn: http://www.ilearn.com/web/about.html)

Repeatedly, on almost every page of the website,  you’ll see, that research has been conducted. However, I only found one reference to a University of FL study done back in 2006. For as many issues as there are in education AND the fact Clarion is a business, I would truly hope all their management isn’t based on one study. I’m sure the folks who work there are great, but it would make more business sense to know who these people are, what level of education they have, and all those other ‘pesky’ details we discerning educational consumers have a right to know.

My overall sense of the website is there is much more that needs to be shared, that frankly isn’t. For example, ‘educator resources’ is all about ‘STRIVE’, well, if I don’t know what “STRIVE” is how will that help me?  The website does give you a somewhat interesting view of what they PLAN to do, but not what they’ve already done. For instance, when I read there was a ‘curriculum map’, I thought it would be visible, then I read the sentence again and saw the curriculum map ‘will be developed AND aligned to state standards so that character education becomes an integral part of an academically rigorous curriculum.’ Continuing on in looking at the website, if I want to meet the board of directors, good luck..they aren’t even mentioned. Yet, Clarion isn’t shy about asking for lots of money. Sorry, if you want my donation, I need TONS of information first and upfront. However, interestingly enough, if you do choose to support the corporation with a financial gift, your request/donation is ‘directed’ to Charter Schools USA’s email (another education management company).

"Strive 65" is a character education curriculum offered by Clarion. Character education aligned to CCSS.
“Strive 65” is a character education curriculum offered by Clarion. Character education aligned to CCSS.

Charter Schools USA:

Like Clarion, Charter Schools USA (CSUSA) is based in Ft. Lauderdale, FL. It is also an EMO. After repeated references in various blogs, and an ardent internet search, I was able to finally find some evidence that Clarion/CSUSA are, indeed connected. How? A ‘YouTube’ video from  2009 showing a kids band playing at the Clarion Council / Charter Schools USA Corporate Picnic. Hugh Taylor Birch State Park in Ft. Lauderdale, FL is what helped me out the most.

Then, I was able to find this from a 2009 newspaper article, the Vice President of CSUSA, Richard Page said, “Our school would be focused on core academics, there would be a unique foreign language program, which would begin in kindergarten and continue through all grades, and a character-education program developed by Charter Schools USA in cooperation with the Clarion Council.” (source: http://www.ledgernews.com/news/top_stories/charter-schools-usa-resubmits-petition/article_44dcb1a3-8526-5727-916f-928329be0061.html?mode=jqm).

I am not suggesting CSUSA only has schools in FL, they have them in many other states, too. If you access the Indiana Charter Schools Prospectus, you can find out quite a bit about CSUSA and Clarion Council. ICN.Academy.Prospectus The report is well over 200 pages, however, the reason I include it today is that not only will you see CCSS, CSUSA, Clarion Council, you’ll see other education doctrines, methods and resources. Then, consider how many school students will be taught this in these ways.

AdvancED & Clarion, CSUSA:

From a 2010 AdvancED Executive Summary, Duval Charter School at Arlington had this to say about the joint effort, ‘Two years ago, Charter School USA, our management company, partnered with the Clarion Council to bring character education into our schools. The program, called STRIVE, is another area that we are proud of as it allows us to recognize and reward students who
are doing the right thing.” When reporting challenges, this statement was at the top of the list,  “One of the greatest challenges has been indoctrinating teachers into the CSUSA culture.“When stating Duval’s support of CSUSA, these are some of the excerpts written, “Duval Charter School promotes Charter Schools USA’s Non-Negotiable Goals… The CSUSA goals are divided into achievement and instructional goals….addition to the CSUSA goals, each school in our network sets its FCAT goals. ….Teachers at Duval Charter School go through training at the beginning of each school year that emphasizes the importance of both formative and summative assessments to determine students’ learning.” (to see all of the report: 7281) Another FL school, Six Mile Charter’s AdvancED report, publised in 2010 (7276) had this to say, “Two years ago, Charter School USA, our management company, partnered with the Clarion Council to bring character education into our schools. This program, STRIVE, is another area that we are proud of as it allows us to recognize and reward students who are doing the right thing. At the beginning of this school year, all faculty members were trained in the Positive Behavior Support Program, which has resulted in a consistent school-wide behavior system.” They, too, as a CSUSA member, have non-negotiable goals; formative and summative assessments. As AvancED customers, both schools have been through the ASSIST alignment to help produce better student outcomes.

AdvancED (http://www.advanc-ed.org/):

Who they say they are, “We are a non-profit, non-partisan organization that conducts rigorous, on-site external reviews of PreK-12 schools and school systems to ensure that all learners realize their full potential.” The website goes on to state, “AdvancED was created through a 2006 merger of the PreK-12 divisions of the North Central Association (NCA) and the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS)—and expanded through the 2011 acquisition of the Northwest Accreditation Commission (NWAC).”
You can find much out about the group by visiting their website. Type in “Common Core State Standards” in the search bar & you’ll get plenty of response! Then, consider HOW many schools, this non profit has under its ‘care’..While not specifically mentioned in the 2012 video below, listen to the rhetoric.

Other EMOs:

In America, there are many other EMOs (education managment organizations). Academica is the largest such in the nation; Imagine Schools is the 3rd. Charter Schools USA is #2 of the three. Academica, CSUSA both were 2013 Excellence in Education contributors. Who’s “Excellence in Education”? Another CCSS supportive organization tied to Innovate Educate (which targets older students, especially workforce related). Imagine Schools has a for profit arm, as well as non-profit (not unusual at all). What’s noteworthy is their for profit is “Schoolhouse Finance”. Oh, IS (Imagine Schools, CCSS is part of the curriculum.) You can find it buried in this file: http://www.imagineschools.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Academic_Framework_FINAL.pdf

One last item:

Qualitycharters.org (National Assoc. of Charter School Authorizers) just received a hefty $800,000.00 grant from the Gates Foundation for the express purpose of  ‘support the final wave of district-charter compact cities in advancing college ready strategies through cross-sector collaboration.’ (source: http://www.gatesfoundation.org/How-We-Work/Quick-Links/Grants-Database/Grants/2014/09/OPP1115953) 

THIS is 'quality'?!
THIS is ‘quality’?!

In closing:

I think, while we’ve learned much, we haven’t learned enough about who is managing education in America. I know there will be more to discover. If you have any leads, hints or resources you’d like to add or share, please, leave a comment! As you can see, by looking at one organization, at least through the context of Common Core, you will find many others connected. Who knew looking at Clarion would take us to so many other groups.