Tag Archives: post secondary Common Core

Credentialed Transcripts?

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The modern education transformation is treating our students like blocks of ‘stackable credentials’, not humans!

‘Tech Thursday’ is the day I usually focus on the overreach in education to the post-secondary level. Today is no exception. If you have followed me for a while, you know I have consistently laid out the evidence and resources so you can follow the CCSS Machine’s march from high school and beyond.

So what can I share with you today?  A look inside the transcripts-turned-credentials for our students under the guise of quality education.

 

Parchment Transcript Services (PTS):

I first heard of PTS, from a dedicated anti CCSS Warrior who is doing much work to protect student data. We know how much is collected, shared, sold, and used against our students, so naturally finding a school (or State) which uses PTS is worth knowing more about.
The website: http://www.parchment.com/
The advertised mission: “Parchment’s mission is to turn credentials into opportunities.  We help learners, educators, associations and employers securely send and receive education credentials online, in simple and insightful ways.”
The zippy 2 minute sales pitch:

 

Did you notice how hidden in plain sight the data mining is? Did you see who shares it, has access to it? Did you notice the use of the fallacy tactic known as ‘Bandwagon’? (bandwagon is where you are enticing to do what everyone else is doing so you don’t miss out) Something tells me there is much more to find out about!

 

The Folks in Charge:

CEO, Dr. Matthew Pittinsky is certainly connected to the CCSS Machine. How can I know this before we even go any further? Two clues: Blackboard and ASU (AZ State University) I have written before about both. To see what else he is doing connected to the transformation of post-secondary education: http://www.parchment.com/matthew-pittinsky/
(*Note: his short video reveals how he feels about data mining.)

Other Leading members include former members of other CCSS Machine member organizations, like Learn.com; there are other former Blackboard personnel; non-profit education advocacy; former military; Honeywell; ISU (Iowa State University); and global education IT (information technology.)
To find out more: http://www.parchment.com/leadership/ (*Note: be sure to check out the Board of Directors. You will find even more ties to the CCSS Machine.)

 

Parchment Partners:

Since Parchment deals with student data, we need to know who they work with in the sharing. Two of the biggest CCSS Machine members which jumped of the page? Herff Jones and Pearson Power School! There are others, as well. See all the partners:
http://www.parchment.com/partners-and-associations/

While Pearson’s membership in the CCSS Machine is known extensively, I will share with you how Herff Jones is also a member.

Most folks think of high school class rings and high school yearbooks when they hear Herff Jones, but the company is more embedded than you know. See:
http://www.socialstudies.com/pdf/CommonCore_SS.pdf (look for footnotes #5, 8, and 9)
Related is my in-depth look at the C3 Social Studies where you will see CCSS, post-secondary CCSS, and global agenda intersect:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/09/rtm-sunday-common-core-and-civics/

From the  Herff Jones yearbook information, this excerpt, “It’s easy to see how yearbook aligns with the Common Core’s emphasis on research, reflection and revision, and the four C’s touted by the Partnership for 21st Century Skills (critical thinking, collaboration, communication and creativity) are naturally a part of the yearbook process. Talk about cross-disciplinary learning!”
To see the rest:
https://www.herffjones.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/WhyYearbook_2015.pdf

How the Service Works on a Local Level:

From the parent of a Senior (Class of 2016), this personal account. “Seniors are required to state what college or university they will attend. All final transcripts will be sent electronically through Parchment. You must sign up via their website before graduation. After graduation, you will be charged $8.50 per transcript. My student must contact their Career Center Counselor/Office for more information.” This parent goes on to share that the Parchment presence in school is a school district promoted decision. Supposedly the only data collected isn’t too personal, but we Warriors know ANY data about our students is up for grabs! Parchment’s service also has you answer on-line questions for specific schools you might want to attend to see IF you can become a qualified applicant.

What I found out about the transcripts is that each is given a unique code (DID or Document Identity Number). For students to access or verify if their information has been transmitted or received, they must use that DID. Hmm.. think UID (Unique Identifier Number) currently used for all those assessments your students think. We have evidence how ‘secure’ those are! If you would like to know, Parchment stands by the FERPA policies (again, we know how FERPA was weakened to allow MORE data mining!) Check out all their related topics:
 http://support.parchment.com/link/portal/30029/30032/ArticleFolder/171/FERPA-security-privacy

Parchment’s latest Press Release shares more about the data collection/sharing. This particular Release details the State of Georgia’s partnership:
Parchment, a leading academic credential management service, works with more than 65 high schools and 72 college admissions offices across Georgia to create a robust network that helps to simplify the college application process for Georgia learners. By delivering and processing electronic credentials with Parchment, member schools are breaking down barriers in the college access process. For more than a decade, Parchment has worked with high schools and colleges across the United States to aid in the application process, making academic credentials, like high school transcripts, digital, often resulting in more timely admissions decisions. Schools in Georgia have already begun to improve efficiencies, provide transparency to learners and reduce overall costs by partnering with Parchment, following the success many other states have long used to their advantage. In 2015, Georgia high schools relied on Parchment to exchange more than 41,000 digital credentials, an increase of 48 percent over the previous year. Parchment has enabled our students and parents to expedite the college application process by sending transcripts electronically to almost any school across the nation,” said Tessa Barbazon, Coordinator, Office of School Counseling with Fulton County School District. “In addition, the tracking tools available to students through Parchment fill a gap in communication that can exist when less advanced services are utilized.” The Fulton County School District is comprised of 18 high schools with 94,000 students.” (see the entire Press Release: http://www.parchment.com/press-releases/parchment-provides-georgia-students-with-improved-college-access/)

To read Parchment’s Privacy Policy, see: http://www.parchment.com/privacy-policy/
While all looks secure, there are a few things to note: 
1) Parchment sends you information they think you want based on how you answered those qualifying questions.
2) Data is shared with ANY partner or group designated as an Academic Institution. While this may look like it means schools, remember the ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) and the current version of the HEA (Higher Education Act) include the academic institutions in a much broader context. (*Note: the current HEA even embeds the use of Digital Promise as the  data collection method on all students. Also, the ESSA has Digital Promise funding INCREASED embedded in the language.)
3) Note the Asset Transfer clause. Even your parents information about finances is up for all to see (or at least whomever Parchment deems worthy of knowing.)

 

 Closing:

I thank the parent who shared their story. Our anti CCSS War Against the Core, is made so much stronger when these brave men and women speak up. I hope this information has caused you to question much when it comes to the transformed high school to post-secondary school state we find ourselves in. While we must champion our students data (and ours as well). we must investigate every company we can. Since it appears the school districts are promoting and choosing this, make sure you let your district know your concerns!

Other Previously Exposed High School Credentialing/Transforming Articles: 

From 11/15, a compendium of information on the subject: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/11/12/tech-thursday-update-on-ccsscte-for-adults/

From 05/15, a look at reducing our students to gold, silver, bronze worthy:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/09/03/tech-thursday-just-say-no-to-nocc/

From 01/15, a 3 part look at those credentialing either our students or post-secondary learning institutions:
a) https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/wybi-wednesday-ice-chilling-our-education/ (USA specific)
b) https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/27/ftf-tuesday-iassc-universal-certification/ (International Credentials)
c) https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/26/monday-musing-an-interview-you-must-hear/ (will reveal some hidden places you need to look for where credentials are needed)

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Special WYBI: CCSS Recaps

The "Would You Believe It?" Wednesday is back this week only!
The “Would You Believe It?” Wednesday is back this week only!

A recap of the ‘Recent Past’ and “Not-So-Recent-Past” in the best of the “Would You Believe It?! Wednesday articles. Grouped by topic to help you focus in on only the portion of anti CCSS info you can best use. Please note, these are only the Wednesday articles, I have many, many more on each of the topics below.

The Recent Past:

Just yesterday, a fellow educational activist, Nancy Bailey released her list of the most ‘wonderful blogs, books, websites’ from the past year. I am honored to share with you that Nancy’s article included my blog among her ‘rare coins’ she has been collecting. Also included as great anti CCSS resources are some of the fellow warriors I’ve come to know and trust.
The Florida Stop Common Core Coalition, Stop Common Core NYS, PW Withering‘s blog made Bailey’s list as well. Peter Greene‘s blog was featured as well. Among the books, Karen  Lamoreaux‘s “No Choice, No Voice” was called out. If you’d like to see the entire article, see: http://nancyebailey.com/2015/09/26/highlighting-websites-blogs-and-books/
(*Note: the article will feature all kinds of ‘education’ resources, not specifically anti CCSS ones)

Another anti CCSS Warrior, I’ve come to know, trust, and guest speak (via the phone) with her, is Anita Hoge. Anita’s been such an inspiration and her Twitter graphics for the anti CCSS Warriors to share and use to fight the illegally based education reform are terrific. You can find Anita on the Internet as well. I’m including her archives here which begin in 2015 and go back to 2013. See: http://www.newswithviews.com/Hoge/anitaA.htm
(*Note: Anita’s work on exposing how FERPA, Title 1 funding, and other funding is desperately needed to help fight the CCSS Machine.)

The Not-So-Recent-Past:

From my blog, divided by topic, are the articles filled with facts, documents, graphics, and more.

Thinking Skills/Play and Games:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/03/free-thinkers-not-needed/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/16/would-you-believe-it-fun-common-core-style/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/15/wybi-wednesday-ccss-and-critical-thinking/

The Standards, themselves/Assessments:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/10/will-this-be-delivery-or-dine-in/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/22/wybi-wednesday-assess-obsess-then-assess-again/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/29/wybi-wednesday-silent-classrooms/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/10/wybi-wednesday-common-core-promises/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/17/wybi-wednesday-summative-testing-task-force/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/11/wybi-fees-ccss-opt-out-mocking/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/08/wybi-ccss-and-ngss-where-dumb-meets-dumber/

UN/UNESCO/ global CCSS:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/24/would-you-believe-it-evil-hath-no-place-in-education/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/08/wybi-wednesday-ccss-and-the-altruism-movement/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/02/04/wybi-the-gtn-of-north-carolina/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/05/20/wybi-global-ed-for-all-through-2030/

Career Tech Ed/CCSS/Career Pathways, Career Clusters:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/01/wybi-wednesday-we-owe-our-souls-to-the-company/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/07/wybi-wednesday-icaps-common-core-and-more/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/28/wybi-wednesday-ice-chilling-our-education/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/17/wybi-nc-businesses-and-common-core/

Early Ed to Grad School:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/14/wybi-update-amping-up-the-common-core/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/21/wybi-new-america-ed-central-pre-k-to-high-pay/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/01/wybi-crystal-clear-common-core/

Homeschoolers and CCSS:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/05/wybi-wednesday-almost-snookered-into-common-core/

Post-Secondary, CCSS, CTE:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/12/wybi-wednesday-national-center-for-post-secondary-research-and-ccss/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/19/wybi-wednesday-flying-minds-common-core/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/04/wybi-ccsss-ego-issues/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/22/wybi-ccss-supporter-profiling-higher-ed-degrees/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/05/06/wybi-upskilling-america-part-1/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/10/wybi-sen-alexander-the-hea-and-next-america/

STEM, Education Waivers, and CCSS:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/02/wybi-wednesday-rttt-stem-ed-waivers-and-more/

CCR/CTE/CCSS/STEM for all educational choices:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/02/11/wybi-jhuy/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/02/18/wybiupclosewithnsf/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/25/wybi-job-development-grants-and-ccss/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/15/wybi-whats-in-a-word/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/05/27/wybi-stem-to-steam-ties-to-common-core-pt-1/

CCSS aligned communities:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/02/25/wybi-seeds-of-gates-for-ccss/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/18/wybi-the-elephant-in-the-ccss-room/

For the Anti CCSS Warriors:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/05/13/wybi-cc-warrior-advice-from-the-battlefielda/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/03/wybi-more-recap-for-anti-cc-warriors/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/24/wybi-recap-of-todays-anti-ccss-guest-apperance/

Closing:
Due to previous commitments, my anti CCSS morning interview normally has me unable to post a Wednesday article, however, this week only, that morning interview is scheduled for tomorrow (so no “Tech Thursday article”) at 9:30 am on the Negdog Radio Blog Talk Radio. You can catch me tonight, however, on the weekly Women on the Wall National Phone Conference Call. To access tonight’s free call: 302-202-1110, conference 702165. To access the Negdog interview, call 347-843-4165. Listen in, ask a question, make a comment. Time for the Women’s call is 8:30 pm, Central; Negdog’s is 9:30 am, Eastern. Both calls will be archived for your reference. I thank you for your continued support in my efforts to rid America of the CCSS Machine.

Sic’ ‘Em Saturday: Post Secondary Makeover

skeletons_in_your_closet_md_wm

Anti CCSS/CTE warriors, if you’re like me, you’ve noticed a distinct makeover of post secondary education and/or the education paths leading up to it, which are willing and able to align themselves to the Common Core Machine.

The question is, will we, the  OPPOSED to Common Core, speak up enough to raise awareness about the alignment of educating American students at the college level and beyond, as we’ve made in pre-kindergarten to 12th grade?

Speaking for myself, I’m going to make all the noise I possibly can! Why? No matter how old our students are, they shouldn’t be aligned to anything Common Core related.

Why This Matters:

For months now, I’ve given you, the anti CCSS warrior, tons of information that’s credible HOW our post secondary education is being remade to fit right along side the movement to transform our PreK to 12th grade education systems. I am far from alone in the warning about this. Yet, we still find the most ardent anti CCSS warriors remaining pretty quiet about what lies beyond high school for our students.  We must realize with the upcoming HEA (Higher Education Act) re-authorization, we can not afford to be quiet!

One of the most used  reasons I hear from anti CCSS Warriors, is that ‘the kids who’ve graduated can speak for themselves.’ While this is true,  an attitude like this in light of  the context of a realignment of American education is 100% dangerous. Yes, our older students CAN speak up for themselves. Yet, if they don’t KNOW about the Common Core movements to usurp American education as we know it, how can they speak up against it?! They CAN’T! More to the point, neither can we.

If we, as anti CCSS/CTE warriors don’t step up our conversations to include (not just  the little ones in our lives, but )the older ones being impact by Common Core or Career Tech Education, then we are doing a vast disservice to every student across our nation.

Imagine it as if you’re telling one child they are less important than another one. Bottom line: you won’t dream of saying it. However, every time we embrace a post secondary, Common Core alternative in the post secondary world, that’s exactly what we are stating! We must help ALL Americans learn where Common Core is lurking in every educational choices, so they can help others know what to look for AND stay clear of!

As our Action step for today, let’s commit to saving every citizen in America from a Common Core, Career Tech, Career Pathway, Career Cluster, or other named CCSS titled education. It’s the least we can do to preserve our children. 

If you’ve like to learn more about where the post secondary dangers of Common Core lie, please contact me ASAP. We’ve no time to loose.

Here’s the link to my 12 pages of post secondary Common Core alignment research and published articles. Almost every one of them points to not only, the public school students, but the special needs students, the homeschooled, the privately educated, the faith based students, those returning to the classroom students, and every one else.
See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/page/12/?s=post+secondary

Tech Thursday: Recapping Higher Ed CTE/CCSS

How interesting the 'who's who' in CCSS, CTE, Career Pathways is becoming.
How interesting the ‘who’s who’ in CCSS, CTE, Career Pathways is becoming.

For today’s “Tech Thursday” article, I’ll be recapping some of my past anti CCSS/Career Tech Ed (CTE)/CCR (College Career Readiness) articles. Why? New followers who don’t have much information about Adult CCSS have been requesting help. Helping new warriors? I’m on it!

A Beginning:

Not long before we were saddled with Common Core Standards (I leave the ‘States’ out from time to time when writing. The States had nothing to do with CCS), a plan hatched by the PCAST team (President’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology). The plan? Creating more science and tech jobs. The means? Common Core Standards. The report was released so close to the rollout, language in the document stated carrying out the jobs agenda via the CCS. The date? 2010 The title of the report? The official title of the report is “Report to the President, Prepare & Inspire K-12 Education in STEM for America’s Future” The original article has the pdf for you to download, a bullet point list of all kinds of educational overhaul you’ll want to refer to. See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/02/from-the-files-pcast-stem-and-common-core/

If you’d like an example of STEM woven into a state’s Workforce Training (ie CTE, CCR), check out my article about the STEM edcation waivers (thanks to Race to the Top). https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/02/wybi-wednesday-rttt-stem-ed-waivers-and-more/

A Pause:

Wait a minute above it says K-12? I thought this was about College/Career Readiness, etc. If you new to the fight against CCSS, you’ll be glad to know that CCSS not only was the vehicle of choice for STEM, but it’s being used as the vehicle for CCR Standards, too. And to think, CCSS is a brain child of P3s, not educators. CCSS is in complete violation of the 10th Amendment to the U.S. Constiutution AND 3 federal education laws! (my very first post has the education laws and how CCSS violates them. See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/08/30/welcome-introduction/ )

Adult CC Standards:

Post Secondary Common Core was always a part of big idea in aligning American education. To assume it ends at 12th grade is a mistake. Back in 2013, the U.S. Dept of Vocational Education published a report. The gist was because there hadn’t been cohesive Adult Standards before then, aligning them was a good thing. What’s of interest is some of the very same CCS writers were on board for writing the Adult version! Meaning anyone from community college to a 4 year higher learning institution would be in the sights of more alignment via CCS. You’ll really want to see how much better these aligned standards are than the previous ones. See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/04/common-core-after-high-school-reality-check/

An example of how Adult Common Core can impact your state’s post secondary education? NC’s is a great one! See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/20/ftf-tuesday-career-readiness-and-data/

HR5’s Claim on Post Secondary CCS and Your Students:

Because post secondary education has students of all ages and all educational backgrounds, it is a fallacy to assume that coming from somewhere CCS wasn’t taught into a CCSS aligned school, your students won’t be impacted. They absolutely will! It is happening on a daily basis as we speak. So, the ‘acclaimed’ HR5 (Student Success Act) made sure (buried in the bill, of course) that CTE (Career Tech Ed) would be embedded. If you’ve not read the text of the bill (it’s a doozy, over 600 pages). You’ll want to see pages 113 and 280. You’ll also want to see each reference to the Perkins Funding and/or IDEA funding. See my article from earlier this year will all the information and links related to this impending nail in education’s coffin.
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/05/tech-thursday-workforce-gunning-for-hr5/

Related information: Since we have all kinds of educational choices in America, have you ever wondered HOW those students outside a more traditional approach are defined? Yes, the U.S. Dept. of Education has even defined what ‘alternative’ education means. However, with the snares and mandates of HR5, how would your non traditional students fare? See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/tech-thursday-career-techcommon-core-and-alternative-education/

To see the over 200 businesses and organizations wanting to see HR5 succeed, visit: http://opportunitynation.org/latest-news/dear-congress-a-letter-from-200-businesses-and-organizations1/

Lastly:

I have been asked by Women on the Wall to speak twice on a national phone in conference call about Common Core in post secondary education. I’ve provided both links for you here so you can access not only the information I shared, but the information from other experts as well. The first interview was in late 2014. The most recent one was a few weeks ago.
2014’s: https://soundcloud.com/alice-linahan/woman-on-the-wall-conference-call-with-lynne-taylor-and-mary-bowen

2015’s: https://soundcloud.com/alice-linahan/wow-conference-call-with-common-core-diva-lynne-taylor-on-workforce-development

Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.
Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.

Tech Thursday: CCSS Workforce Pushing Labor Reform

Post secondary ed reform is set to be 'reauthorized'. You can bet your sweet backside CCSS will be there in the form of CTE.
Post secondary ed reform is set to be ‘reauthorized’. You can bet your sweet backside CCSS will be there in the form of CTE.

Common Core for the Workforce is present through Career Tech Education. This isn’t new news for those of us fighting the CCSS. However, were you aware that there’s a push to reauthorize the Higher Education Act? By doing so, you can bet CCSS via CTE will be there.

The Higher Ed Act:

Originally written in 1965, under Pres. Johnson domestic agenda for America called “The Great Society”. It was to increase amounts of federal aid universities and colleges received. The Act was to also increase student aid to get into institutions of higher education. It also established a national teacher corps program.
The HEA (as the Higher Education Act can be referred to) has been reauthorized several times. The updates to the law have been many and wide reaching. Much of what your students and mine fill out on their FASFA forms is tied up in this law.

Most notable in what I’ve been able to find in researching is the 1998 versrion known as “Gear Up”  If reauthorized, this would be the 3rd time. As always, the CCSS is buried. Where would it be found? Perkins funding, those Titles funding programs, work study programs, apprenticeships, and probably more. We’ll get to the particulars in a bit. But first, what does “Gear Up” stand for? “Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs”. Remember, this was started in 1998. Before CCSS. But how ironic that we have so much ‘readiness’ rhetoric in modern education.

The 2008 Workforce/Education ‘Marriage’:

According to the Center for Law and Social Policy’s document highlighting the changes to HEA, here’s the one that joined education and businesses (think P3s, or public-private partnerships), “Creates Business Workforce Partnerships for Job Skill Training in High Growth Occupations or Industries. Colleges often lack the “venture capital” to start up new, credit-bearing programs that can respond to business workforce needs because state funding and federal financial aid typically only flow after students are enrolled in programs. This grant program funds partnerships of colleges, employers, and, where applicable, labor representatives to expand or create credit-bearing college programs responsive to business workforce needs, adapt college offerings to workers’ schedules, expand worksite learning opportunities, and purchase equipment related to such academic or job training programs. The grants are targeted toward programs serving nontraditional students, such as working adults, and can be used to create for-credit career pathways (Section 803).” 

Other items which supported this ‘marriage’? TRIO and Bridges from Jobs to Careers. If you don’t know much about TRIO, here’s what the U.S. Dept. of Ed. has to say about it, “The history of TRIO is progressive. It began with Upward Bound, which emerged out of the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964 in response to the administration’s War on Poverty. In 1965, Talent Search, the second outreach program, was created as part of the Higher Education Act. In 1968, Student Support Services, which was originally known as Special Services for Disadvantaged Students, was authorized by the Higher Education Amendments and became the third in a series of educational opportunity programs. By the late 1960’s, the term “TRIO” was coined to describe these federal programs. If you don’t know much about Bridges from Jobs to Careers, it basically was a federal program which awarded competing higher education institutions grant money. There were mandatory requirements for use of the funding. In our current educational panaroma, each state appears to have some sort of bridge/work program. I didn’t find all 50 states in my general search, but I did find several states which are proudly open for business, so to speak.

To find out more about TRIO: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/trio/index.html#references (*Note: at least one of the TRIO programs will begin its overreach as early as middle school)

To read the entire law from Congress back in the day, https://www.congress.gov/bill/110th-congress/house-bill/4067/text

To see CLASP’s information (including the key senators involved), http://www.clasp.org/resources-and-publications/publication-1/0430.pdf

A Jump Ahead to 2014:

While CLASP is still somewhat fresh on our minds, let’s see what more current ed/jobs efforts they’ve been up to.

Here’s a screen shot from their website that plainly has “Career Pathways” displayed. It also states ‘low income’ and ‘disadvantaged’. With some of the sweeping changes embedded in HR5, who is classified as ‘disadvantaged’ and ‘low income’ could drastically change to include almost every student!
You definitely will want to enlarge this screen shot.

The Gates Foundation has a firm grasp on CLASP.
The Gates Foundation has a firm grasp on CLASP.

There’s no question in my mind how much CLASP is tied into the Gates Foundation and is helping direct the policies of this nation. How utterly disgusting. If you want more information about them, see: http://www.clasp.org/issues/postsecondary Oh, and one more nugget of truth the WIOA (Workforce Investment and Opportunity Act) which has 21 embedded CCSS, CTE, and/or Career Pathways in it will take effect July 2015.

The 2015 Push:

If you’ve not already had to run away from your computer screaming after the bombshells from above, know that Washington is hard at work as we speak plotting even more reform. To this end, refer back to the opening screen shot you saw. It’s at the very top of the page. What I want you to find is the phrase about the 4 pillars of action to be taken in reauthorizing HEA. I’ll include the PDF file, but here’s a quick summary:
Point #1: empowering family decision making; Point #2: Simplifying and improving student aid; Point #3: promoting innovation, access, and completion (of what isn’t clarified upfront); and Point #4: insuring strong accountability and a limited federal role.

Drawbacks to the points include more data tracking/mining via the Integrated PostSecondary Education Data System (IPEDS); the federal agencies streamlining information families can access to cause less confusion; more robust financial literacy; having the U.S. Dept. of Ed create a higher education rating system; strengthening federal financial aid; streamlining student debt repayment plans to better serve taxpayers; making the Pell Grant flexible; possible federal interference in the ‘innovation, access, and completion’ point ( I strongly believe you should read and assimilate the information directly from the source); increasing the push for more digital learning; increasing the competency-based outcomes for students; more federal assistance for those with the lowest incomes; ramping up teaching preparedness via federal programs and/or influence; and, a possible move to make accreditation entities become more rigorous when it comes to post secondary education institutions. For all the details and for your research: hea_whitepaper



To learn more about IPEDS from the U.S. Dept. of Ed: http://nces.ed.gov/ipeds/about/

To learn more about the government entity overseeing all interested parties into post-secondary education and data collection, see: https://nces.ed.gov/npec/ (*Note: be sure to look at the Research/Development Board Members. Note which institutions or organizations they represent)

To learn more about the NCES (National Center for Education Statistics) which oversees all types of assessments (includes post secondary ones), see: http://nces.ed.gov/whatsnew/commissioner/index.asp

*Note: The NCES commissioner oversees all the assessments you see below and then some.

To access the entire list/graphic of he assessments, visit: http://nces.ed.gov/about/
To access the entire list/graphic of he assessments, visit:
http://nces.ed.gov/about/

To access the National Post Secondary Education Policy Cooperative’s “Student Success” pdf (which includes public policy, alignment, and more), ewell_report

More You May Want to Know:

The original screen shot showed that an upcoming hearing would be taking place to discuss not only all I’ve shared with you, but even more. Involved in the hearing will be federal budget, plans, and workforce. You’ll want to listen to the entire thing. This hearing actually took place yesterday, March 18th. I can tell you from the opening remarks, at least one U.S. Congress member wasn’t a fan. Here’s a screen shot from Twitter taken from the Ed/Workforce feed:

Link to the hearing as it is on You Tube:
Link to the hearing as it is on You Tube:
[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6kOf2UeClzg%5D

For Further Related Info:
Articles I’ve previously published on this subject include (not limited to)
11/16/14, CTE, labor unions, federal funding, and more: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/16/rmt-vp-unions-career-tech-and-common-core/

11/18/14, Gear Up, College and Career Ready Consortium, and more: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/18/ftf-tuesday-ccrec-college-and-career-readiness-evaluation-consortium/

Tech Thursday: College/Career Readiness Success and Common Core

Click to enlarge this wheel.
Click to enlarge this wheel.

CCR, College and Career Readiness:

Hardly a new subject for me to write about, but more Common Core aligned evidence is popping up. Where did I get the above image from? A CCR Success Center!! You, too can visit their website to see just how fabulous of a job your state is doing when it comes to CCSS transitions from high school to college! http://www.ccrscenter.org/

Please first notice who houses this “Success Center”…AIR! (American Institutes for Research) A well known CCSS (Common Core State Standards) supporter, data miner! Funding, you ask? Why, the U.S. Dept. of Education, of course! Others involved ar the American Youth Policy Forum (AYPF), Forum for Youth Investment (FYI), National Association of State Directors of Career Technical Education Consortium (NASDCTEc), Quill Research Associates, LLC (QR), Achieve, Inc., American Association of Community Colleges (AACC), Campaign for High School Equity (CHSE), Change the Equation (CTEq), Collaborative for Academic, Social,  and Emotional Learning (CASEL), College Board, CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers), IDEA Partnership (includes the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s Office of Special Education Programs), National Association of State Directors of Special Education (NASDSE), The National Center for Analysis of Longitudinal Data in Education Research (CALDER), North Carolina New Schools, SHEEO (State Higher Education Executive Officers), and Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship. To read a short description of each and to see how they have a hand in our higher education’s CCSS pot: http://www.ccrscenter.org/about-us/our-partners

Among the organization’s advisors is Dr. David Conley. I hope you took my advice from a couple of days ago and looked into his educational background, current educational philosophies and Common Core participation. You’ll be seeing his name in this post again.

Other things the “Success Center” does for our students:

ccrcontentcentersredo

Helping align our states to Common Core and create ‘success’ are what are called “Content Centers”. There are also “Regional Content Centers”. The Content Centers are run by WestED, AIR, Edvance, Temple University, and the National Institute for Early  Education Research.

Regional Centers have the States divided into the color coded sections you see above. Each group is run by a select few organizations: WestED, SEDL(formerly Southwest Educational Development Laboratory), ICF International, University of Oklahoma, Educational Testing Service, AIR, Mid-Continent Research for Education and Learning, RMC Research, Education Northwest, and the Pacific Resources for Education and Learning. So just what will I find for the state I live in? Plenty! Since you all know I live in NC, the first thing I noticed is the group of states with NC are in the “Southeast Comprehensive Center”, but I see SEDL (seen above). So my first question is “Why, when I don’t live in the Southwest, is North Carolina overseen by this group?”

Guess I have to click on the Southeast Group to find out. So, I do. I see lots of vivid colors, I see a smiling face of a lovely lady..then I see below her smile, these words, “she focuses on curriculum and instruction, particularly the Common Core State Standards, effective literacy practices, early childhood education, and professional development to improve literacy outcomes in districts and schools.” This lady is considered an expert. However, there are many other experts whom I found. Each with what their areas of expertise are and how it’s devoted to the CCSS.  I click on the tab with my state’s name and instantly see 10 current Common Core projects going on!! It was curious for me when I saw the words “Past Projects”, so I found the tab for that, clicked and was appalled! CCSS projects, one after another.. From 2005 to 2012! Current projects range from early childhood education, to community wide readiness, to videos for math and English. I go on to discover the Southeast Center is developing a CoP (Community of Practice) with the neighboring states also included in our Grouping. Take a look at all that will be shared: http://secc.sedl.org/resources/community_of_practice/cop_resources.php  

So what are the neighboring states up to? Well, according to this SE Center, Alabama’s getting the college/career readiness standards, Georgia’s getting the Career Tech Standards, South Carolina is assessing teachers, and Mississippi is getting the little learners ready for school success. Lovely, just lovely.

What I don’t see on this particular website, is where in NC, the office is located. Hhmmm..where can I find that? By going to the other SEDL Center…Texas! Once there I see that each of the Southeast states do indeed have contact information. NC’s is out on the Coast. (hint: if you are curious, look under the ‘contacts’ on the SEDL’s main site)

More ‘successes’:

Since our original intent for Thursdays is to expose Common Core beyond high school, let’s look at other post secondary ‘college/career readiness success’ resources.

Lumina Foundation’s publication from 2013 “A Path to Alignment: Connecting K-12 and Higher Education via the Common Core and Degree Qualifications Profile”. Authors are Dr. Conley (Educational Improvement Policy)  and Dr. Gaston (Kent University). According the the “Executive Summary” of the paper, ‘The heart of the white paper lies in sections 5 and 6, which provide a crosswalk between the CCSS and the DQP. These sections show how alignments and differences between the two may point to a comprehensive preparedness strategy. They also offer a proposal for a multifaceted strategy to realize
the potential synergy of the CCSS and the DQP for the benefit of high school and college educators and their students — and the nation.”  Here’s the entire report: A_path_to_alignment

Achieve, Inc’s “Common Core State Standards and Career Technical Education: Bridging the Divide Between College and Career Readiness” study is also featured as a key resource. Like the Lumina publication above, the CCR Success Center wants to help you know, they are ‘all in’ to the success of Common Core alignment for your students. Now, I’ve written about this particular study before, so I know it’s loaded with tons of information you can use to inform legislators, school boards, and others who are convinced post high school CCSS is a myth.

The study was published in 2012, has the details on the CCSS/CTE/CCR teams that were formed. Here’s an excerpt from the “Executive Summary”, “Common Core State Standards & Career and Technical Education: Bridging the Divide between College and Career Readiness aims to provide guidance to state education leaders about how they can maximize the opportunity to better align academics and CTE through the implementation of the new CCSS by:

» Summarizing what state leaders are currently doing to integrate the CCSS and CTE;
» Providing specific strategies and supporting examples of what particular states are doing and 

» Identifying common barriers and challenges that state leaders face.”

The study will also reveal how the Perkins Act is the main federal funding source for CTE (Career Tech Education) and how the CCSS is taking advantage of this. Here’s another excerpt you’ll find eye-opening: “To establish a reference point on the current level
of CTE involvement in CCSS implementation, Achieve and the Meeder Consulting Group
developed a survey for state CTE directors and state CCSS coordinators to take collectively. The survey was implemented during a two-week window in November 2011. Drawing from the survey findings, eight states were selected for more in-depth interviews: California, Illinois, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, New Jersey, Ohio and Oregon.
The purpose of the survey was to determine how state education agencies are including CTE leaders as stakeholders or partners in their CCSS implementation efforts.”

You’ll especially like that the study includes CCSS being written into CTE curriculum (see page 13, where Chapter 4 begins). Page 19 shares how CCSS/CTE align teachers were brought into the mix. Chapter 8, begins on page 22, and expressly details the alignment of post secondary education with Common Core, “To represent true college and career readiness, postsecondary administrators and faculty from the core academic disciplines and technical areas should be aware of and involved in implementation of the CCSS. Postsecondary CTE faculty can provide information about the kinds of literacy and
math skills that will be necessary for students to succeed in their postsecondary CTE programs. Technical colleges are particularly important in these efforts given their role in delivering CTE at the postsecondary level. If secondary CTE educators are reluctant to embrace the CCSS, then this kind of input from postsecondary CTE faculty can reinforce the case for strengthening literacy and math in CTE programs.” See the rest: http://www.achieve.org/files/CCSS-CTE-BridgingtheDivide.pdf

A video: 

From the CCR Success Center’s You Tube Channel (where you’ll find several CCSS/CCR/CTE webinars), here’s the one from the National  High School Center back in 2013.

Closing:

I hope you have really found some very useful information in the last 3  posts. Each one has involved SHEEO, CCSSO, AIR, and the U.S. Dept. of Ed. The articles have been designed to be a one, two, and three punch in the face of the CCSS Machine. If you like, think of it in the ‘3 Strikes’ analogy. However you think about it, realize because each of these Three posts, ALL educational choices are involved. How? Because no matter what choice you’ve made for education in preK to 12th, we all have post secondary opportunities that are either publicly or privately funded. Some use both types of funding. It is becoming almost impossible to find a post secondary school NOT embracing either Common Core, Career Tech Common Core, College/Career Readiness or a combination of any of these. Remember, STEM is also woven into this mix, so the net that’s been cast over a our nation, has certainly gotten even wider than we first knew.

WYBI Wednesday: National Center for Post Secondary Research and CCSS

It’s “Would You Believe It Wednesday” and I cannot think of a better follow up for this week’s “From the File Tuesday” about SHEEO, the CCSSO, and CCSS than today’s eye-opener of a research paper by the NCPSR (National Center for Post Secondary Research) describing in detail the purposed implementation of CCSS!!

Yet another bullet of truth today. Share!!
Yet another bullet of truth today. Share!!

In our above photo we see a young lady, possibly a college age student. Today’s post is for you, sweetie, and the millions just like you. Desiring to move ahead on life’s path, with Common Core standing in your way.

National Center for Post Secondary Research:

In February 2013, a paper was published by the Center about the need for Common Core in post secondary schools. However, let me share just which groups make up the Center before we get into the bullets of truth for today.

1) The Center is comprised of the following schools, organizations: Gates Foundation, Hewlett Foundation, Harvard University, The Community College Research Center, Teachers College, Columbia University, MDRC (formerly known as the Manpower Demonstration Research Council; it’s a education policy group), and the University of Virginia.

2) The Center was founded by funding provided by the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Institute of Educational Sciences.

3) The 2013 “Working Paper” for today’s ‘Would you believe it?’ is titled ‘Common Core State Standards: Implications for Community Colleges and Student Preparedness for College’ 

The Paper:

Here’s an excerpt from the opening pages, “Based on a review of literature and on interviews with individuals involved in the CCSS nationally and in Washington, Florida, and Kentucky, this paper outlines the development of the CCSS and the CCSS-aligned assessments, the involvement of higher education representatives in their design and implementation, and how the CCSS and the aligned assessments can be used to support the mission of community colleges.” 

The introduction goes on to state the 2 national assessments will be used, later in the paper, they will be announced, but I think you can guess, right? PARCC and SBAC. The paper will go on to state that standards haven’t been consistent and that has posed a problem. If you’ll remember I wrote my very first “Tech Thursday” post about the “Adult CCSS” and how the Common Core was intentionally chosen. (see 9/4/14’s “Common Core After High School, a Reality Check”)

Pages 3  and 4 highlight some “College and Career Readiness” Partnerships, but not to the extent yesterday’s post did.

You’ll find the research questions used in this study on page 9, and below:

1. “What role has higher education played in the development and
implementation of the Common Core State Standards (CCSS) and aligned
assessment systems?
2. How is the implementation of the CCSS and their aligned assessment
systems unfolding in three selected states? What has been the role of higher
education in these states?
3. What are the policy and practice implications for community colleges of the
CCSS and their aligned assessment systems, particularly in light of recent
research by CCRC and others?”

The three data sources for the results of the above questions?? The 3 groups we learned about yesterday!! The CCSSO (Chief Council of State School Officers), the SHEEO (States Higher Education Executive Officers), and the AASCU (American Association of State Colleges and Universities).

Note: the 3 selected states are FL, WA, and KY, see their side by side comparison of implementation, complete with details notes, on page 20. I’ve included a few highlights from the 3 states below:

1) Florida’s role in the CCSS implementation process for higher ed, “Both the Florida College System, which consists of 28 community and state (four-year) colleges, and the 12 public universities that make up the Florida State University system have been involved from the beginning with alignment  discussions related to the PARCC assessments. “ Followed by, “A Florida state statute maintains that high schools must administer a college readiness
assessment in 11th grade to students that score within a certain range on the state assessment exam, the Florida Comprehensive Assessment Test (FCAT 2.0). School districts may use any Florida State Board of Education–approved assessment, and many districts have chosen the Postsecondary Education Readiness Test (PERT) for this purpose. If a student does not attain the college-ready cutoff score on the PERT, she is required to take college postsecondary preparatory instruction, called College Success and College Readiness courses. This set of courses is comprised of college developmental education courses offered at the high school level and is aligned to the CCSS and to college-level competencies.”

2) KY’s role in the CCSS implementation process for higher ed, “The appearance of the CCSS was timely for Kentucky. In 2009, legislators enacted a new state law, Senate Bill 1 (SB1), which required the state to revamp both its standards and assessments by spring 2012. SB1 included a mandate that the Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education (CPE), the Kentucky Board of Education (KBE), and the Kentucky Department of Education (KDE) collaborate to create a unified college and career readiness plan that would lead to a reduction in remediation rates and an increase in college graduation rates (Kentucky Council on Postsecondary Education, 2013)” Following that, “…. implications of the CCSS for universities and two-year colleges, such as how these new standards would impact the teaching of introductory-level general education courses. Among the three states profiled for this study, Kentucky was the only state where those interviewed reported that the higher education sector had played a substantial role in reviewing and providing feedback on the drafts of the CCSS.” Then, “The higher education sector was also involved in developing a statewide definition of college and career readiness, also required by SB1.”

3) Washington’s role in the CCSS implementation process for higher ed, “According to a state higher education official, the higher education sector played no formal role in the early stages of the adoption process for the standards and, outside of connections to teacher education programs, there had been minimal outreach to higher education representatives to participate. However, they have become more involved with the
CCSS implementation process in recent months.  Washington, like Florida, partners with Core to College to encourage K–12 and high education alignment activities.” 

Key to the 3 states are funding, legislation, and timing in the successes or setbacks in implementing CCSS in higher education. Beginning on page 33 is how the other states will be impacted, if they haven’t been already. This encompasses ‘dual enrollment’ programs (in NC, it’s called “Career and College Promise”), on-line classes, and more! On page 36, see how the community colleges curriculum will change, if it hasn’t already. Here in NC, all the community colleges are already aligned to CCSS, textbooks, assessments, and lesson plans all reflect it. **Note, if you have a student in a community college, ask to see the textbooks, the on-line portions of their course work OR have them understand what to look for in regards to CCSS aligned materials! I have a community college student, I’ve seen the textbooks..they are NOT better, in spite of what we’ve been told. Professors HATE teaching the CCSS at this particular school, but must or they have no job!

On page 38, the CCSS alignment between high schools and community colleges via partnerships begins. From the Appendices (you’ll really want to look there), is this lovely note, “Only seven states (Georgia, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, New York,
North Carolina, and West Virginia) have completed plans in all three areas
(Porter et al., 2012).” This is in reference to where are the other states in the process of implementing and aligning to CCSS in higher education. Link to the entire study: http://www.postsecondaryresearch.org/i/a/document/25958_common-core-state-standards_2.pdf

The MDRC:

I’m highlighting this organization because while it’s a partner in all this, it’s one we know very little about. Not anymore!

The formerly named “Manpower Demonstration Research Council” was created back in 1974 by the Ford Foundation and a select group of federal agencies. In 2003, the group trademarked a new name, “MDRC”. It’s non partisan, non profit. MDRC address education and social issues especially when impacting the low-income population. You’ll want to see the rest of their history and where they’ve worked (hint: more than the USA). See: http://www.mdrc.org/about/about-mdrc-history

Among its Board members are representatives from pro Common Core schools or organizations such as the Brookings Institute and Harvard. (there are others, too).

Among the funders are the following Federal agencies,

  • U.S. Department of Agriculture
  • U.S. Department of Defense
  • U.S. Department of Education
  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
  • U.S. Department of Labor
  • U.S. Social Security Administration
  • National Institutes of Health, National Institute of Child Health and Human Development

 

Known and identified pro Common Core supporters:

The National Governors Association, The Joyce Foundation, Carnegie Corporation, Knowledge Works, The Gates Foundation, AIR (American Institutes for Research) HOWEVER, there is an incredible amount of support via many other organizations, public and private! See the entire list of shame, http://www.mdrc.org/about/funders-mdrcs-projects

Their report, published in 2011, focused on ‘career focused learning community’. Also in conjunction with the NCPR.  Helping fund the paper among our known supporters, was the MDRC Endowment.

“Contributors to the MDRC Endowment include Alcoa Foundation, The Ambrose Monell
Foundation, Anheuser-Busch Foundation, Bristol-Myers Squibb Foundation, Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, Ford Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, The Grable Foundation, The Lizabeth and Frank Newman Charitable Foundation, The New York Times Company Foundation, Jan Nicholson, Paul H. O’Neill Charitable Foundation, John S. Reed, Sandler Foundation, and The Stupski Family Fund, as well as other individual contributors.”

Why this study bears investigating: 21st Learning Communities are a very real threat to our American way of life. I’ve written about them, so have others. It’s a portion of the Agenda 21, global mindset where a school becomes more than a learning institution, but the community center where every service is offered. With “Knowledge Works” involved (see above) I’ve seen their ideal of the “Strive Together” communities, 90 strong already in working order across the US. “Cradle to Career for EVERY Student” is their mindset.

Link to the MDRC’s study: http://www.mdrc.org/sites/default/files/Breaking%20New%20Ground%20ES.pdf

A division of Knowledge Works, which is an arm of the CCSSO.
A division of Knowledge Works, which is an arm of the CCSSO.

In Closing:

If you didn’t find your state community colleges listed, don’t relax for a minute! Remember the Career Pathways are ALSO in our community colleges and high schools. As you have learned 4 year high education institutions ARE not EXEMPT from Common Core!

 

FTF Tuesday: Meet SHEEO

We all love a great discovery, don’t we? Especially in finding out about how far and wide the net is cast across our nation when it comes to Common Core. Today, you won’t be disappointed. We’re going to be finding out about SHEEO, The States Higher Education Executive Officers Organization. They are regular partners with the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers) and the U.S. Dept. of Education. We know so much already about the USDofEd, CCSSO, we’ll be homing in on this ‘new’ organization.

SHEEO, partner of The CCSSO and others:

(www.sheeo.org) According to the website the organization has been around since 1954. Among its purposes, it serves the member states via their higher educational systems, helping shape education policies, and being a liaison between states and the federal government. Currently, there are 55 members from many different states and Puerto Rico. The Executive President is the Executive Director for the Higher Education System in Alabama, Gregory Fitch. Be sure to discover who represents your state. My SHEEO representative is the President of the University of North Carolina, Thomas Ross. We have 17 campuses across our state. As a parent of a student at one of the UNC member schools, I’m not surprised to discover the link, but it is proof, that none of us are ‘safe’ from the overreach of CCSS. (Common Core State Standards)
*Note: You’ll want to especially look at the SHEEO members from the states which didn’t ‘adopt’ the Common Core, like Alaska or Texas. Why? Because, as I’ve written extensively about, the College and Career Readiness, the Adult Common Core will be in post secondary (aka higher education) institutions. This encompasses community colleges and on-line learning as well.

Partners of SHEEO include the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers), the College and Career Readiness Project, and the National Center for Educational Statistics. There are other partners you’ll want to investigate as well.

Current Projects:

1) College and Career Readiness Partnership (CCRP). Here’s an excerpt that you MUST read and share, “In December 2010, three national education leadership associations—the American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU), the Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO), and the State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO)—joined in a College and Career Readiness Partnership (CCRP) to promote broad implementation of new Common Core State Standards (CCSS) in mathematics and English Language Arts (ELA). Through its combined network of leaders, the CCRP works collaboratively to address those issues that reside at the intersection of the PK-12 and higher education systems. Primarily, this includes addressing what is needed for successful utilization of the CCSS and common assessments of student achievement, both to improve college readiness in PK-12 and to make effective use of these assessments for placement and other decisions in postsecondary education.”    In June 2011, the CCRP staff worked with the Steering Committee to select a first Cohort of seven states—Kentucky, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Oregon, Tennessee, Wisconsin—to work closely with the Partnership through State Leadership Teams on the statewide goal of effective, cross-sector, Common Core implementation.” The following excerpt is from the AASCU’s announcement, “The Phase II timeline is October 2012 – December 2013. Missouri, Oregon, Wisconsin will continue as Cohort 1 of Phase II and five new states will be invited to join as Cohort 2 for Phase II.” According to the American Association of State Colleges and Universities, Lumina Foundation and the Hewlett Foundation fund the entire Project. Both are well known CCSS supporters.  This organization has its own set of CCR initiatives going. If you can access a copy of their published “Serving America’s Future: Increasing College Readiness”, you can find out more. Unlike the other files I share on Tuesdays, this one isn’t free. In fact it is $30.00. You can access for free the “Executive Summary” of the detailed report,     http://www.aascu.org/CollegeReadiness/ExecutiveSummary/   

*Note: While at the AASCU website, be sure to check out their member states, schools. Be sure to look at the territories and international locations included.

To find out more about the CCRP, Defining_College_Career_Readiness Be sure to remember, states which do not ‘adopt’ CCSS, do indeed have ties to this project. For example, Texas has “Project Share”. Also, research the paper’s author. You’ll be glad you did.

Somewhat related: This excerpt is from 2009, that I found on-line, “There is a new effort coming under way which I will be involved with and documenting closely to set data standards in the country. This is being done in partnership between USED, CCSSO, SHEEO”   

To read the rest of the 2009 information,  ( http://thejackl.org/tag/sif-pesc-duncan-used-gates-ccsso-sheeo/)

2) MSC, Multi State Collaborative to Advance Learning Outcomes Assessment. “The MSC is designed to produce valid data summarizing faculty judgments of students’ own work, and also seeks to aggregate results in a way that allows for benchmarking across institutions and states. The primary goal of the initiative is to provide assessment data that will allow faculty and institution leaders to assess—and improve—the levels of student achievement on a set of cross-cutting outcomes important for all disciplines. With the active support of the State Higher Education Executive Officers Association (SHEEO) and the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U), nine states—Connecticut, Indiana, Kentucky, Massachusetts, Minnesota, Missouri, Oregon, Rhode Island, and Utah—agreed to collaborate in the development and pilot testing of a different model for learning outcomes assessment—a model that is rooted in campus/system collaboration, in authentic student work, and in faculty curriculum development and teaching activity. The project builds on efforts in Massachusetts (as part of its Vision Project) and builds on the AAC&U LEAP initiative through which it developed a common set of rubrics—VALUE Rubrics—to assess the LEAP Essential Learning Outcomes.” Below is a graphic you’ll want to notice in detail, so click to enlarge it.

Student data, shared with Labor.
Student data, shared with Labor.

To check our your state’s data sharing: http://www.sheeo.org/resources/publications/strong-foundations-state-state-postsecondary-data-systems-2012-update-data

3) Lumina, SHEEO and your state’s funding:

This project is known as “Moving the Needle”. “The State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO) association supports the Lumina Foundation’s push to reach a 60% college attainment rate in the United States by moving from an access agenda to a focus on both access and success. As the membership organization for the state-level governing and coordinating boards of higher education, SHEEO is focused on state-level policy and the role(s) the states can play to reach the goals of the completion agenda. As such, SHEEO is uniquely positioned to understand and consider the varying state contexts that our members operate within and use this knowledge to evaluate state policy recommendations related to college affordability.”

To read more about this,  Moving_the_Needle_041414

4) Common Education Data Standards (CEDS), this project works with AIR (Association for Institutional Research), WICHE (Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education) which is funded by the Gates Foundation, and the Postsecondary Electronic Standards Council. There are other partners as well, so be sure to check them out. CEDS began in 2009. To learn more about just what is ‘common’ and what isn’t, http://www.airweb.org/EducationAndEvents/IPEDSTraining/AdditionalResources/Pages/CEDS.aspx

From the PESC (Postsecondary Electronic Standards Council), this is a list of which organizations are involved in CEDS:

The CEDS User Group participants include representatives from:

  • AcademyOne
  • ACT
  • AEM Corporation
  • Brandon University
  • California School Information Service (CSIS)
  • Choice P20 Solutions
  • College Board
  • College Source
  • Colorado Community College System
  • Ed-Fi
  • Ellucian
  • eScholar
  • Florida International University
  • Georgetown University
  • Hobsons
  • IBM
  • Jenzabar
  • McGraw-Hill
  • Michigan Department of Education
  • National Association of Student Loan Administrators (NASLA)
  • National Student Clearinghouse
  • Naviance
  • North Dakota Department of Education
  • Ontario Universities’ Application Centre (OUAC)
  • Oracle
  • Parchment
  • Perceptive Software
  • QIP
  • Questionmark
  • Rapid Insight
  • RTI
  • SCRIP-SAFE International
  • SIF Association
  • State Education Technology Directors Association (SETDA)
  • State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO)
  • Triadvocates
  • Turning Technologies
  • USA Funds
  • US Department of Education, Office of Under Secretary

The current Co-Chairs of the CEDS User Group are:

  • Hans L’Orange, Vice President for Research and Information Resources, SHEEO
  • *Tony Romano, Director of Information Technology, National Student Clearinghouse

To see even more about student data collection: http://www.pesc.org/interior.php?page_id=208 When you visit this page, be sure to notice the banners that flash up at the top. Don’t miss the one about collaborating for the students greater good.

mullercore

 

Tech Thursday: Workforce Commissions, Education, and Common Core

Now you know, CCSS is most decidedly post high school.
Now you know, CCSS is most decidedly post high school.

Thank you for joining me last night as I went in-depth on the topic of a CCSS aligned work force. It is my hope you were able to glean helpful information to aid your battle in your state. ‘Women on the Wall’ archives each call, so if you missed anything, you can access it from their website.

NC, Bound for “Workforce Destiny”:

Commission on Workforce Development Strategic Plan 2014-16 I’m leading off my post for today with my state’s Report for how it is planning on carrying out Workforce training. Yes, involved in the thick of it, is Common Core, Career Pathways, and lots of other connecting ties. In this report, you’ll learn the name of the Commission which makes the Workforce related decisions THEN advises the General Assembly and our Governor. You’ll discover their ‘master plan’ which includes data mining.

You’ll get to see which groups at state level are partnering to align NC. Those involved according to this report? The Dept. of Administration(NC DOA), the Dept. of Commerce(NC DOC), the North Carolina Community College System, the North Carolina Dept. of Health and Human Services(NC DHHS), and finally, the North Carolina Dept. of Public Instruction.

What’s interesting is that the NC Dept. of Public Instruction is under the authority of the General Assembly which is contained in our Legislative Branch. Contrast that with those private schools, and homeschools which are under the guidance of the Dept. of Non Public Instruction(NC DNPE), which is in the Dept. of Administration. Community colleges, public colleges and universities are also housed in the Dept. of Administration. What about the Dept. of Commerce? It too, is in the Dept. of Administration. As far as the proprietary post secondary schools(for profit schools such as Nascar Tech, DeVry, etc.? They are housed with the NC Community College System(NCCCS). Charter schools depending on their status us ‘public’ or ‘private’ would be respectively, NC DPI and NC DNPE.

Note where Career Education is housed. The NC DPI (Dept. of Public Instruction). Which answers to the NC General Assembly, in the Legislative Branch.
Note where Career and Technical Education is housed. The NC DPI (Dept. of Public Instruction). Which answers to the NC General Assembly, in the Legislative Branch.

According to the Report from our Workforce Commission, lots and lots of money from the federal level and the state level has been poured into aligning. (see page 4 of the Report).

Monies featured cover things like:

  • career tech education (DPI) $430,661,949.00;
  • Post Secondary Career Tech/Vocational Ed (NCCCS), $372,928,057.00;
  • Basic Skills (NCCCS), $89,175,304.00;
  • Workforce Investment Act (NC DOC), $79,691,240.00;
  • Wagner Peyser (NC DOC), $19836,199.00 {Note: Wagner Peyser Act was from 1933 and address workforce, the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act not only keeps this Act going, but amends it.}
  • Apprenticeships (which are a ‘new’ hot item for aligning workforces) will also be receiving big bucks and are in the NC DOC, $1,604,447.00;
  • Workforce alignment money is also under the Displaced Homemakers, $289,670.00;
  • the American Indian Workforce Development Program, $247,991.00 (both in the NC DOA);
  • Veterans (NC DOC), $5,446,000.00
  • Customized Training (NC DOC), $23,587,840.00

So, why would I share all these figures? Simply put, they all involve post secondary instruction. Instruction that will be provided by vocational schools, community colleges, vocational schools, proprietary schools, colleges, and universities.

So where’s the ‘Common Core’?

Excellent question. In my opinion, because CCSS is such a toxic brand name, we’ve seen how companies, states, and others have rushed to re-brand it. However, in most of the items I’ve seen connected to the Workforce legislation, your key words are NOT ‘Common Core’, BUT Career Pathways or Career Clusters. It’s assumed you, the citizen, wouldn’t know the difference, nor would you be interested. How wrong those powers that be are! One of the guiding principles for NC’s Workforce Commission is:

“The workforce system will focus on target industries and career clusters.”

Goal #1: Streamlining must occur!

“The commission recognizes that North Carolina’s public workforce development system is a key part of the state’s economy. It is comprised of a variety of programs with a broad range of activities that serve a diverse group of people. It includes a group of interactive and interdependent entities, programs, and services. Activities range from self-service activities online, to staff assisted services in a workforce office, to multi-year training programs at a public school or community college. In addition, programs serve people with varying levels of education, employment experience, and barriers. Individuals may participate in a single program or activity or may be eligible to receive services through a variety of programs and entities. The system exists to help businesses find qualified workers to meet their present and future workforce needs and to help individuals gain the skills and training they need to obtain and maintain employment.” How  is all this to be accomplished?

 ‘Align partner services and strategies.
 Develop a common brand to be used across workforce programs that is recognizable to all customers.
 Increase awareness of and accessibility to workforce services.
 Develop shared marketing strategies that promote the talent in North Carolina.’

Goal #2: More of Goal #1, but leading up to Goal #3. Basically we MUST have economic (the Great Recession of 2007) prowess again. Workforce will get us there.

Goal #3: Education, our Way, Not Yours:

How it will be done:

 ‘Strengthen career development services and ensure consistency across programs.
 Enhance programs and enrollment in critical career clusters by targeting resources.
 Strategically coordinate programs among workforce partners to develop skill and education pathways.
 Become a national leader in providing structured work-based learning.’

Also included was more about the desperate need to streamline (Goal #1), to be relevant (part of Goal #2) and

‘it is essential for the state’s workforce programs to target its limited resources to careers in high-growth and emerging industries. Providing consistent information to individuals and strong programs in critical career clusters will not only help individuals find good-paying jobs, but it will also help businesses find the talent they need to growth their business.
One of the best ways to help individuals gain skills and learn more about a career is through work-based learning. These programs combine classroom education with on-the-job experience and individuals gains valuable work experience while learning new skills.
The commission recognizes the need for consistent information, a focus on high-growth and emerging industries, work-based learning opportunities, and it supports policies that shift our culture to one that embraces life-long learning.’

Goal #4: Data, You Got It, We Mine It:

This is the last of the 4 goals the NC Workforce Commission published. By far the most compromising..at least for the students who end up in the Workforce. The Report shares with you, the reader, that it used to the U.S. Department of Labor was the only one receiving Workforce data. But, as we know, that’s about to change. The U.S. WIOA 2014 (the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014), as I’ve written about will take the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s Student Longitudinal Data System and merge with it. In some states it’s already happening. In others states, it’s just taking off, and in some states, it hasn’t begun yet. Workforce will be in all 50 states.  So, if you state didn’t adopt CCSS, you’ll get in via Career Pathways or those Career Clusters.

Here’s the plan for pulling this off:
 ‘Develop a consistent and coordinated approach of identifying critical career clusters that workforce system partners will use to target resources to meet the needs of the economy.
Gather, evaluate, and utilize information on the usage and quality of services.
Measure and report on the effectiveness of the workforce development system.’

Justification for all this data? Accountability. Being accountable means rigorous measuring. Because if we can’t measure rigorously, how will we know that the Workforce is going to fit the agenda?

The last paragraph or two details how it’s the Commission who will plot, plan, and begin the chain of implementation in NC. They have the Governor’s ear. They have the General Assembly’s attention. It also involves Common Core.

So What About Your State?

Find out what the name of your Workforce Commission is. Find out who serves on it.

Discover their plan by finding their report. Do they answer directly to a particular branch of government or person?

Is there any voter say in the matter or is all this assigned? We, here in NC, get told what is up, there isn’t a vote about it.

Has your state gotten their WDQI ( Workforce Data Quality Initiative) grant money to ‘align and mine’? (see my earlier posts about the WDQI)

If you need a refresher on HOW Career Clusters and/or Career Pathways are Common Core Standards for Adults, here are some links:
From Achieve, Inc. 2012, http://www.achieve.org/files/CCSS-CTE-BridgingtheDivide.pdf (look at page 22 and beyond)

From CTE (Career Tech Education), where you’ll find the “Career Clusters” as well as the page that links CCSS to Career Clusters:
http://www.careertech.org/common-core-state-standards For the Clusters: http://www.careertech.org/career-clusters

WorkKeys (which is job profiling, CCSS aligned and is part of ACT, Inc. which is part of College Board) My fellow anti CCSS warrior’s blog article about the alignment of WorkKeys/CCSS: http://ladyliberty1885.com/2014/06/23/common-core-aligned-workkeys/

Career Pathways, those Dept. of Labor programs that will force the alignment of education and workforce, my post from 10/02/14: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/02/tech-thursday-ccss-career-pathways-and-workforce/

From the U.S. Dept. of Ed, Career Pathways Aligning to CCSS 101: http://ctecenter.ed.gov/training_center/training/pathway-curricular-design-and-instructional-practice

Finally, remember, each Thursday, since I began my blog, there has been an article each week about CCSS post high school. I’ve got a brand new report to share next week that will undeniable confirm what some still deny…that CCSS isn’t post high school!