Tag Archives: NH

Global, Smobal?!

Anti Fed Ed Warriors, we know there are continued links between ‘federally led education’ and globally led education. We also know these ties which lie between education and our communities are deeply embedded. To that end, I’m using ‘global, smobal’. The “global” is self defining. The “smobal”? My take on ‘small town gone global’.

The manifestations of these ties are easily found in the UN’s (United Nations’s) SDGs (Sustainable Development Goals), as well as the American laws:
WIOA (Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014), ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act of 2015), HEA (Higher Education Act, currently being re-written), and any other law which combines any of the above.

Thanks to many Anti Fed Ed Warriors and many other Anti Global Education Warriors, we’ve been able to see what programs are being used to breed so much collectivism. As we know, the UN’s SDGs use education as the single most important ‘change agent’ to infiltrate our towns and cities. (Source for image below)

toolkitblurb

What do some of the activities look (or sound) like to bring the UN’s desired alignments to fruition? I have a few examples below:

Global, Smobal: Part One:

Warriors, recently I was in Georgia attending to family business. While helping out, I found myself in a doctor’s office where I picked up a local magazine. The magazine was all about the arts and culture of the area. As I was thumbing through the pages, I stumbled upon an article about a county at the opposite end of the State, where the citizens are finding Career Clusters as a great unifier for them.

One of the reasons this particular magazine was featuring the far away county? Since it appears to be such a great success in one rural area of Georgia, it can be an equal success somewhere very similar in another part of Georgia.

barrow
See how the local magazine’s writer ‘sold’ the Career Clusters Pathway alignment:

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(Source for the article, see page 99 and those immediately following)

To learn about the Georgia county featured, go here. Notice on Page 6, the amount of STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and, Math) aligned workforce education, as well as those ‘wonderful’ Career Clusters. Note that the County’s schools are charter ones. Notice among the community unifying buildings is a new innovative amphitheater. By sheer coincidence, the area I was visiting had just completed their new amphitheater.

Global Smobal, Part Two:

Also, in the same magazine, another article about a multi state effort to join businesses and education. This effort is geared more for adults than the previous article, where students are the main focus. To find that article, go to page 93 and those immediately following. Below, is a screen shot of one of the pages:

domistation

If you’d like to learn about the STEMIE Coalition, (STEMIE stands for ‘Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math linked to Invention and Entrepreneurship’) 
STEMIE is based in CT with leaders in CA, FL, GA, IA, ID, IL, MA, NH, OH, OK, SC, TN, and TX).
It was the AL based
Champion Network (link is in the above screen shot) which helped STEMIE Coalition get started. Visit STEMIE.

Warriors, the ‘global smobal’ here that this new type of business and education collaboration is a direct product of STEM. The purpose of the ‘teamwork’? Redefining how communities work.
Below is a screen shot of the early 2000s Tool Kit education-for-sd-tool-kit-fully-highlighted-1.

(*Note: this article is just one where I give you more context for the Tool Kit.)


sdgp67

As we know, STEM is a UN directive contained within the SDGs. The redefining of our communities? That’s straight out of the SDG Tool Kit. How does STEM tie to the Career Clusters? Read the ‘research’ behind STEMIE. The free K-12th grade curriculum for STEMIE? Aligned to the Common Core, Next Generation Science Standards and, is based off the PAST Foundation’s framework for education.

PAST Foundation is based in OH, but is an international group devoted to project based learning combining STEM and anthropology to prepare for 21st Century careers. PAST’s public private partnerships are what make this twist on STEM ‘work’. Warriors, as we know, the increase of P3s (public private partnerships) was a mandate of ESSA, the Every Student Succeeds Act.

globalkid

Global Smobal #3:

April 21st, 2018, my local town newsletter is advertising the Global Youth Service Day. According to the town’s information, this workday is the only one devoted to children (ages 6 to 18). What type of projects will be completed? Local service projects to benefit the collective community.

globalsmobalmville

If you want to see how sold out to the UN’s SDGs the YSA (Youth Servicing America) is, look below:

ysasdg

Warriors, if you access @YouthSDGs (Twitter), you’ll find a tweet where the 17 Sustainable Development Goals reveal 169 targets throughout them. You’ll also find how targeted our youth are to achieve the collectivism of  it all.

Remember, these are woven into education across America! Regardless of where you go to school.

youthsdg


More Global, Less Local:

Warriors, look below at this screen shot of the March 2018  ISO Technical Committee for Asset Management Systems Report on attaining the SDGs through good management of your organization’s assets. For our context, think your city budget and city employees:

moneymanagesdg

As if high-jacking the city budget isn’t bad enough, check out the SDG 2030 Board Game you can use to teach your kids! (*Note: you will be asked to register to download the game, board, dice pattern, and, questions. They will appear on your computer has zip files.)

sdgboard

Warriors, in what other ways are your businesses, towns and schools working together in these types of ways? What about the rural Americans? How are they being encircled? Look around you, my friends!

Closing:

Warriors, if you haven’t seen the connection of all the UN/SDGs and STEM to your country’s demise at the hands of the CCSS Machine, I hope this article has helped shed some light on the dastardly wicked deceptions going on in education. We are well on our way to being that ‘STEM nation with a STEM people for a STEM economy with STEM jobs’ for a global good which was inserted in America during the previous administration. Presently, no stopping this global dagger which pierces our hearts has been given by the current administration.

Tech Thursday: CTE, CCSS, and Special Needs in Post Secondary Education

Back in December 2014, I first wrote about Common Core, Career and Technical Education and its impact on the Special Needs students. What’s the latest for this population group in Post-Secondary education? Let’s find out in today’s article. Below is the link to the 2014 article:

https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/tech-thursday-career-techcommon-core-and-alternative-education/

Also related to this is the CCSS alignment of IEPs: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/rmt-ccsss-present-to-special-needs/

Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.
Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.

An Education Webinar from June 30th:

Just a couple of days ago, the Gates Foundation backed “Education Week” hosted a free educational webinar about post secondary life for those with special needs. The following information is from links suggested as credible resources during the webinar. Credible for us, the anti CCSS Warriors, means we can use the resources to know where to look to access the CCSS Machine’s grasp for our students with special needs.

Education Week’s article, “Advocates Hope Common Core Will Rub Off” shares this criticism that not enough transitional planning is going on for those with special needs shifting from high school to post secondary education. While that may or may not be true, it’s the source EW used which is skewed towards CCSS/CTE (AIR, American Institutes of Research) offering the criticism. “”Many plans lack depth, breadth, and personalization; have low expectations for students with disabilities; do not include plans for postsecondary education; and do not map out how the K–12 education system should connect to other systems, such as postsecondary, vocational rehabilitation, workforce training, or independent services,” says a 2013 report from the American Institutes for Research. “As a result, many students with disabilities leave high school with amorphous and generic plans that fail to address their individual circumstances or interests.” To access the entire article: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/04/advocates-hope-common-core-will-rub-off.html?intc=EW-DPCT15-TOC

From that 2013 AIR Report (be sure to click on the image to enlarge it):

AIRneeds

To access the 2013 AIR Report: Improving College and Career Readiness for Students with Disabilities

NASDSE, the National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Inc.:

This group based in VA, is supporting the ‘Every Child Achieves Act’ (aka: HR5 as the re-authorization of the NCLB law which in turn gave us Race to the Top and Common Core). Here’s an excerpt from their letter of support to Sen. Lamar Alexander, “NASDSE commends you for including in your bill language that only allows up to one percent of all students – those who have the most significant cognitive disabilities – to take an alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards. This cap is critical to ensuring that students with disabilities will remain on track to graduate from high school prepared for postsecondary education and/or a career. We therefore urge that you oppose any efforts during the bill’s markup that would raise or eliminate this cap.” You can read the entire letter, http://www.nasdse.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=hLXguhdRtoM%3d&tabid=36

Also available from the NASDSE, is a 2004 data collection document which spells out what ADDITIONAL data is collected on each student with special needs. You can read it: SpecNeedsDataCollect

NASDSE has been around since 1938, but its most recent set of goals includes more post secondary success for the students served. Here’s a short paragraph you may find interesting, “The continued collaboration with our key partners, including the National Association of State Title I Directors and the Council of Administrators of Special Education brings us closer to common language in serving and improving outcomes for all students and remains a priority for NASDSE, as is collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs, in order to provide input regarding implementation of the State Systemic Improvement Plans,  Results Driven Accountability and the role of the National Center for Systemic Improvement (NCSI) in providing direct support to our members.”

The Board of Directors are all from various states across America and their Public Instruction departments. AZ, VA, MT, NH, UT, CA, GA, and SD. See: http://www.nasdse.org/AboutNASDSE/BoardofDirectors/tabid/406/Default.aspx (*NOTE; from here you can explore more about the organization via the left hand menu)

If you’re curious about the funding each state receives for educating special needs students, NASDSE and AIR (as in the group above) partnered together back in 2010 and published a report about this topic. See: NASDSEAIR

To find out all the NASDSE’s corporate sponsors and other groups involved: http://www.nasdse.org/ResourceLinks/tabid/59/Default.aspx

Pacer’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment, http://www.pacer.org/transition/:

From their website, “Founded in 1977, PACER Center was created by parents of children and youth with disabilities to help other parents and families facing similar challenges. PACER Center enhances the quality of life and expands opportunities for children, youth, and young adults with all disabilities and their families so each person can reach his or her highest potential. PACER operates on the principles of parents helping parents, supporting families, promoting a safe environment for all children, and working in collaboration with others.” It is a non profit organization based in MN. It is funded by the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Office for Special Education Programs (*NOTE: you can find this fact at the bottom of every page on the website highlighted in blue)

From the Pacer’s 2014 published resources, a ‘new’ way to look at career paths for those students ready to go from high school to post secondary education. Here’s an interesting couple of paragraphs to read. When reading, consider the context of Career Pathways and/or Career and Technical Education (which are CCSS aligned), “To be able to acquire these skills and effectively change jobs, and plan and manage multiple careers over one’s life time, career development skills are important. The process by which youth get to know their strengths and interests, learn how different jobs connect with those interests, and build these career planning and management skills is called career development.” 

“By helping to support youth in making important informed decisions about their future, parents and other caring adults can contribute a great deal to their children’s post-high school success. For youth with disabilities in particular, families often play the very important roles of setting high expectations for youth’s future employment, and of advocating for opportunities for them to identify their strengths and interests and to explore career options. Families who learn about and begin the career development process with their youth early will be better prepared to support them in choosing and building a bright future. “Family” here is defined broadly as adults and children related biologically, emotionally, or legally, including single parents, blended families, unrelated individuals living cooperatively, and partnered couples who live with biological, adopted, and foster children.” The entire document was found on a linked website from the Pacer’s website. The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability (NCWD). To read the NCWD’s entire document, http://www.ncwd-youth.info/node/1463 (*NOTE: The NCWD is part of the Institute for Educational Leadership which is a supported by a grant from the U.S. Dept. of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, ODEP; you can find this information at the bottom of the page when you access the article mentioned directly above. It’s highlighted in blue.)
“Think College!”, http://www.thinkcollege.net/:

From their website, you can find out that  “Think College is a project of the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The Think College initiatives are funded by grants from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, the Office of Special Education Programs, and the Office of Postsecondary Education.”

For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports
For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports

If you’d like to see the CCSS tie between the Standards and Boston College, http://frontrow.bc.edu/program/braun/

For more proof of BC’s CCSS stance:

BostonCollegeccss

Closing:

If you need more evidence of how intrusive the CCSS Machine is being in regard to our families and students with special needs, please let me know. If you have such evidence or wish to provide a real life account of your family’s saga with Career and Tech Education or Common Core, please let me know.