Tag Archives: NASDSE

Bon Voyage! Hello, Grinders

Well, Warriors Against the Core, we’ve made it halfway through the week. While Congress hasn’t made too much noise about fed ed, the U.S. Dept. of Ed has.

Also busy at work? Those CCSS Machine members/groups bent on aligning our nation as quickly as they can.

However,  before we get to the latest moves, let’s be sure to say a not so cheerful ‘Bon Voyage’ to Rep. John Kline as the head chairman for the U.S. House of Representative’s Education and Workforce Committee.

During Kline’s rein, he helped ramp up fed ed, not decrease it. His position of power for education and workforce has plunged our nation further into deep and dark places which will take years, if not the rest of our lives, to correct….and, Kline’s walking away. Why are our students not given the same choice?!

tweedle
His partnering with Sen. Lamar Alexander, as chairman of the Senate’s HELP Committee, has been one we Warriors do not need to soon forget. Between these ‘twins’, American education has seen a complete shift from academic to aligned; from freedom of choice to forcibly constricted. The only thing these 2 have filled our ‘looking glasses’ with is smoke.

While we know Kline’s leaving all this behind, who is stepping into his shoes? Rep. Joe Wilson from SC. Time will tell what we can expect from him. It is my personal hope that Mr. Wilson will be a true champ to our students, not another chump. Serving as co-chair will be Rep. Virginia Foxx from NC. She’s already shown her love for CTE (Career Tech Education) many times over. Will our voices be enough to melt her heart? Time will tell.

To all those about to be elected  as Congress members, the featured picture is an oath I hope you will take on behalf of the anti CCSS Warriors and those opposed to fed led ed.

So all that said, Bon Voyage, Rep. Kline, we Warriors Against the Core, will not pine.

Let the ESSA Grinders Begin:

Grinding down our kids Participant #1)
9/27/16, Data Quality Campaign had the unmitigated gall to release this:
“Among ESSA’s numerous provisions highlighting the value of data in education is a new provision to expand the role of research in education.” They carry on with how this is to help the States.

dqcupdate
If you wish to see the 5 page document: http://2pido73em67o3eytaq1cp8au.wpengine.netdna-cdn.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/08/DQC-Why-research-matters-09142016.pdf

Be sure you note the OTHER involved CCSS Machine member groups.

You will also want to see the 4 data policies DQC will ram down our throats, too.
http://dataqualitycampaign.org/why-education-data/make-data-work-students/

Grinding down our kids Participant #2)

While folks are still scrambling mad about Dr. King’s ‘overreach’ in post-secondary education and his off-base remarks about home education, he’s been busier than a king in his court. Meeting with special education teachers, leaders of education related groups (aka CCSS Machine member groups), groups who influence teachers in Title II funding, and all the while telling American students how great education is, and hey, while you’re at it, come fill out a new and improved FASFA app. He even crowned a ‘family engagement ambassador’.

Congress has proven they have short-term memory problems. Why? It’s their confirmation which saddled our nation with Dr. King’s ‘service’.

Participant #2 grinds on….

Late Tuesday, 9/27, America was given a newly crowned “Family Engagement Ambassador”. But, wait, more will be crowned in the future. Here’s an excerpt from the 27’s Press Release, ” U.S. Department of Education’s first Family Ambassador, Frances Frost, to increase parent and family engagement in education policy. The Family Ambassador position is made possible by a grant from the Kellogg Foundation and an agreement with The Campagna Center of Alexandria, Virginia, to support family engagement in education.”

Remember when it was decreed by first Duncan, and then King, that the U.S. of Ed was to be your partner as a parent? This is the way in which it’s being softly sold. Below, it a picture:

edparentpartner
You’ll want to download this. Look at the CCSS Machine member groups who contributed to this! frameworks-resources

Grinder #3)
The ‘Chiefs for Change’ meeting was all about Title II funds. I covered the toxic CCSS Machine ties to CforC back in the previous election cycle when lots of State Superintendents were running in elections. These ‘Chiefs’ are all up in federally led education! To see their website: http://chiefsforchange.org/

To see how CCSS Machine influence is being used in relation to Title II funding (ie: public tax dollars): https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2016/08/03/saluting-all-you-hortons/

To see the Dr. King/Chiefs for Change meeting:

kingchief

To access the Chiefs Title II/ESSA document: cfc-title-ii-policy-brief

What’s interesting is that King met with Chiefs in the afternoon, and led a teacher discussion in the evening…hmmm, can we say ‘agenda’?!

Back to Grinder #2, again)
So what in ‘blue blazes’ did King say to the special education  folks at their convention?
The CCSS Machine member group, EdWeek, tells a subjective side,
http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/speced/2016/09/education_secretary_praises_pr.html

From the EdWeek article, you can see that two national groups devoted to special education had a first ever joint conference. The NASDSE (National Association of State Directors for Special Education) and the CASE (Council of Administrators) just wrapped up. See what ESSA items they discussed:

casespeced

My research about NASDSE :
1) https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/10/19/monday-musings-idea-when-good-goes-ccscte-bad/
2) https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/07/02/tech-thursday-cte-ccss-and-special-needs-in-post-secondary-education/
3) What ESSA has in store for special needs:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2016/01/26/school-board-special-part-three/

Grinder #2, yet still)
King
even showed up (9/26) to encourage the Gen-I students! Gen-I is short for “Generation Indigenous”
See the Press Release: http://indiancountrytodaymedianetwork.com/2016/09/26/white-house-outlines-massive-outreach-indian-country-tribal-nations-conference-165903
You’ll need to note that Sec. Sally Jewell was there, HUD (as in U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development) and others were not only in attendance, but helping to lead the ‘unity’ (aka: alignment). I recently wrote about the degradation of education at the hands of the CCSS Machine:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2016/08/22/is-this-truly-the-best/

Closing:

Warriors, I know you see lots of opportunity to choose where you’d like to take a shot at the CCSS Machine. After all, It’s mission is what I call an ‘equal opportunity offender’.
Let’s be purposed, focused, and armed with facts when we do strike.

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Monday Musings: IDEA: When Good Goes CCS/CTE Bad

Source: ideamoneywatch.com
Source: ideamoneywatch.com

Fighting CCS and CTE for those with special needs is especially heart rendering. I’ve had the honor of speaking with several parents of these wonderful students. In my educational experience, I’ve worked with these families and seen how an education that fits them, NOT streamlines them is a delight. However, when I speak with parents today, they are not delighted, their students are miserable, and all involved feel absolute anger and frustration toward the misuse of education and IDEA funding.

What’s IDEA funding? It is a federal statute set up in 1975. It’s original name was “Education for All Handicapped Children”. Congress, at some point, began to refer to it as “IDEA”. The name then or now isn’t so important as WHAT the funding does.
From what I’ve found the Act has 2 purposes: a) due process detailing parental rights, and b) permanent grants available to states for ‘free, appropriate public education to all children with disabilities in the least restrictive environment’.
(*Source: http://atlas.newamerica.org/individuals-disabilities-education-act-overview)

.

Where Good Went Bad:

Let’s see if we can pinpoint what other groups are supportive of the shift where IDEA went from its original purpose (stated above) of ‘appropriate education in the least restrictive way’ and when it aligned with Common Core

From 2009, a pdf file from the NASDSE (National Association of State Directors of Special Education). Why this pdf? See the screen shot below:

badidea2

To access the entire pdf: idea_partnership
Why this matters in 2015: 1) if you’re a new anti CCSS Warrior, this may be information which is new to you; 2) knowing the dates of the pro CCSS Machine’s activities can help those who’ve been fighting CCS and all its other entities by tracking when and where it showed up in their states, who might be involved and knew what the states were in for, but went along with it, etc.

So what’s the NASDSE up to now, in 2015? Currently they are conducting 8 projects. One of which might be of particular interest in our War Against the Core. It is called the “National Center on Educational Outcomes Subcontract”. (NCEO for short). This particular subcontract is through the University of MN. Working with the NASDES, the Univ. of MN, is the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers)! The goal of their teamwork? Assessments! More assessments for our special needs students. To read more about this project, see: http://www.nasdse.org/Projects/TheNationalCenteronEducationalOutcomesNCEO/tabid/421/Default.aspx
(*NOTE: this page will have an embedded link to the NCEO’s website. Go to that website. You’ll find “College and  Career Readiness Standards”, formative assessments, Universal Design of Assessments, and, you can access any of their publications {which date back to 1996}. You can access the 2015 publication where you can find out how CCSSO is driving IEPs to be written, as well as how assessment for ALL learners was discussed: 2015ForumReport Be sure if you live in CO, AL, or KS, you see how your states are used as success models.)

Somewhat related is the 2006 Report I found featured on the website for the National Assoc. of Secondary School Principals  (which just this past weekend I showed you how aligned to CCSS/CTE they are).  This particular report is addressing the need for IDEA to become ‘fully funded’. Take note of the other groups in the IDEA Partnership involved in the full support of this. It can help you trace IDEA funds timeline, especially where the 2004 re-authorization of the ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act) was concerned. See: principalsreport
Another project of the NASDSE is the “Idea Partnership”. Fully funded and equipped to work across  ‘federal agencies, federal investments, national organizations, State agencies and stakeholder groups’. To see the full description of this project, see: http://www.nasdse.org/Projects/IDEAPartnership/tabid/413/Default.aspx


To see the 2015 list of all the IDEA partners: http://www.ideapartnership.org/the-partners.html
One of the IDEA Partnership ‘Working Together’ activities? The “Cradle to College and Career Pipeline”! When did this happen? 2011, according to the website. You need to have the rest of the information on this directly from the website. Visit: http://www.ideapartnership.org/working-together/collaboration-on-issues.html?id=1572:overview-on-cradle-to-college-career-collection-work&catid=400:cradle-to-college-a-career-ccc-collection
Below is a screen shot from the IDEA Partners stating what they believe to be their purpose in the Pipeline.

cradlespecial

Be sure to click on the website address directly above the screen shot, scroll down and click on ‘Dialogue Guides for Cradle to College and Career’. Once there you can see an ‘Early Learner’ Guide, which is for pre-K to 3rd grade; for Middle School, it’s the “Breaking Ranks” reports I told you about in this past weekend’s news. Lastly, the transition for middle to high school in included. Other than the national group of those secondary school principals I told you about, you can see how the ECS, ‘Education Commission of the States’ is cited as a source for the dialogue documents.  If you are curious as to the alignment of the ECS to CCSS and CTE? Don’t be. It is 100% evident on their website. See below.

This group claims 'they don't take sides' in education. The states pay to belong to this group. They also span P-20 education.
This group claims ‘they don’t take sides’ in education. The states pay to belong to this group. They also span P-20 education.

As far as not taking sides, I would have to disagree. Why? Here is an excerpt of just one of the education projects they are conducting, ‘ECS is continuing the Blueprint Project, funded by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Designed for state leaders, the Blueprint features a menu of 10 critical policies that promote college readiness and success.’
Briefly, the 10 policies most critical according to ECS:
1) high school policies (has 4 distinct subsections)
2) higher education policies (has 4 distinct subsections)
3) policies for bridging from high school to higher education (has 2 which include data mining)
To get the “Blueprint”: ECSBlueprint (*Note: 2 states which didn’t take CCSS, TX and VA, are used in this report as shining examples of college and career readiness.)
To learn more about ECS, http://www.ecs.org/html/aboutECS/home_aboutECS.htm
(*Note: I will be digging into this group more in the near future. There’s a lot more information we need waiting there.)

Bottom line for the musings today: We’ve got some great information for using to fight the Core, let’s get busy!

Tech Thursday: CTE, CCSS, and Special Needs in Post Secondary Education

Back in December 2014, I first wrote about Common Core, Career and Technical Education and its impact on the Special Needs students. What’s the latest for this population group in Post-Secondary education? Let’s find out in today’s article. Below is the link to the 2014 article:

https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/tech-thursday-career-techcommon-core-and-alternative-education/

Also related to this is the CCSS alignment of IEPs: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/rmt-ccsss-present-to-special-needs/

Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.
Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.

An Education Webinar from June 30th:

Just a couple of days ago, the Gates Foundation backed “Education Week” hosted a free educational webinar about post secondary life for those with special needs. The following information is from links suggested as credible resources during the webinar. Credible for us, the anti CCSS Warriors, means we can use the resources to know where to look to access the CCSS Machine’s grasp for our students with special needs.

Education Week’s article, “Advocates Hope Common Core Will Rub Off” shares this criticism that not enough transitional planning is going on for those with special needs shifting from high school to post secondary education. While that may or may not be true, it’s the source EW used which is skewed towards CCSS/CTE (AIR, American Institutes of Research) offering the criticism. “”Many plans lack depth, breadth, and personalization; have low expectations for students with disabilities; do not include plans for postsecondary education; and do not map out how the K–12 education system should connect to other systems, such as postsecondary, vocational rehabilitation, workforce training, or independent services,” says a 2013 report from the American Institutes for Research. “As a result, many students with disabilities leave high school with amorphous and generic plans that fail to address their individual circumstances or interests.” To access the entire article: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/04/advocates-hope-common-core-will-rub-off.html?intc=EW-DPCT15-TOC

From that 2013 AIR Report (be sure to click on the image to enlarge it):

AIRneeds

To access the 2013 AIR Report: Improving College and Career Readiness for Students with Disabilities

NASDSE, the National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Inc.:

This group based in VA, is supporting the ‘Every Child Achieves Act’ (aka: HR5 as the re-authorization of the NCLB law which in turn gave us Race to the Top and Common Core). Here’s an excerpt from their letter of support to Sen. Lamar Alexander, “NASDSE commends you for including in your bill language that only allows up to one percent of all students – those who have the most significant cognitive disabilities – to take an alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards. This cap is critical to ensuring that students with disabilities will remain on track to graduate from high school prepared for postsecondary education and/or a career. We therefore urge that you oppose any efforts during the bill’s markup that would raise or eliminate this cap.” You can read the entire letter, http://www.nasdse.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=hLXguhdRtoM%3d&tabid=36

Also available from the NASDSE, is a 2004 data collection document which spells out what ADDITIONAL data is collected on each student with special needs. You can read it: SpecNeedsDataCollect

NASDSE has been around since 1938, but its most recent set of goals includes more post secondary success for the students served. Here’s a short paragraph you may find interesting, “The continued collaboration with our key partners, including the National Association of State Title I Directors and the Council of Administrators of Special Education brings us closer to common language in serving and improving outcomes for all students and remains a priority for NASDSE, as is collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs, in order to provide input regarding implementation of the State Systemic Improvement Plans,  Results Driven Accountability and the role of the National Center for Systemic Improvement (NCSI) in providing direct support to our members.”

The Board of Directors are all from various states across America and their Public Instruction departments. AZ, VA, MT, NH, UT, CA, GA, and SD. See: http://www.nasdse.org/AboutNASDSE/BoardofDirectors/tabid/406/Default.aspx (*NOTE; from here you can explore more about the organization via the left hand menu)

If you’re curious about the funding each state receives for educating special needs students, NASDSE and AIR (as in the group above) partnered together back in 2010 and published a report about this topic. See: NASDSEAIR

To find out all the NASDSE’s corporate sponsors and other groups involved: http://www.nasdse.org/ResourceLinks/tabid/59/Default.aspx

Pacer’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment, http://www.pacer.org/transition/:

From their website, “Founded in 1977, PACER Center was created by parents of children and youth with disabilities to help other parents and families facing similar challenges. PACER Center enhances the quality of life and expands opportunities for children, youth, and young adults with all disabilities and their families so each person can reach his or her highest potential. PACER operates on the principles of parents helping parents, supporting families, promoting a safe environment for all children, and working in collaboration with others.” It is a non profit organization based in MN. It is funded by the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Office for Special Education Programs (*NOTE: you can find this fact at the bottom of every page on the website highlighted in blue)

From the Pacer’s 2014 published resources, a ‘new’ way to look at career paths for those students ready to go from high school to post secondary education. Here’s an interesting couple of paragraphs to read. When reading, consider the context of Career Pathways and/or Career and Technical Education (which are CCSS aligned), “To be able to acquire these skills and effectively change jobs, and plan and manage multiple careers over one’s life time, career development skills are important. The process by which youth get to know their strengths and interests, learn how different jobs connect with those interests, and build these career planning and management skills is called career development.” 

“By helping to support youth in making important informed decisions about their future, parents and other caring adults can contribute a great deal to their children’s post-high school success. For youth with disabilities in particular, families often play the very important roles of setting high expectations for youth’s future employment, and of advocating for opportunities for them to identify their strengths and interests and to explore career options. Families who learn about and begin the career development process with their youth early will be better prepared to support them in choosing and building a bright future. “Family” here is defined broadly as adults and children related biologically, emotionally, or legally, including single parents, blended families, unrelated individuals living cooperatively, and partnered couples who live with biological, adopted, and foster children.” The entire document was found on a linked website from the Pacer’s website. The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability (NCWD). To read the NCWD’s entire document, http://www.ncwd-youth.info/node/1463 (*NOTE: The NCWD is part of the Institute for Educational Leadership which is a supported by a grant from the U.S. Dept. of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, ODEP; you can find this information at the bottom of the page when you access the article mentioned directly above. It’s highlighted in blue.)
“Think College!”, http://www.thinkcollege.net/:

From their website, you can find out that  “Think College is a project of the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The Think College initiatives are funded by grants from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, the Office of Special Education Programs, and the Office of Postsecondary Education.”

For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports
For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports

If you’d like to see the CCSS tie between the Standards and Boston College, http://frontrow.bc.edu/program/braun/

For more proof of BC’s CCSS stance:

BostonCollegeccss

Closing:

If you need more evidence of how intrusive the CCSS Machine is being in regard to our families and students with special needs, please let me know. If you have such evidence or wish to provide a real life account of your family’s saga with Career and Tech Education or Common Core, please let me know.