Tag Archives: Lumina

FTF: A ‘Dependent Truth’


Well, the new U.S. Dept. of Education Secretary is wasting no time when it comes to selling higher education opportunities. But are these opportunities truthful ones? Will these opportunities come with MORE Common Core State Standards strings attached? What about College/Career Readiness? Career Tech Education (and all its other names) and their strings?

I guess it all DEPENDS! Join me in my “From the Files” Tuesday article as we explore this ‘dependent truth’.

The U.S. Dept. of Ed’s ‘Dependent’ Story:

If you just look at the Tweet above, you would think, ‘sounds great, we need more opportunities for low-income students’. However, as we have learned with the pro-CCSS U.S. Dept. of Ed, you can NOT take what sounds great and prove it out to BE great..there is ALWAYS some ‘dependent truth’ embedded. So just WHAT is the Tweet referring to, in hopes of drawing you in? Let’s find out!

First ‘dependent truth’: since the Tweet refers to ‘higher education’, you need to go directly to the OPE (Office of Post Secondary Education) WITHIN the U.S. Dept. of Education. See: http://www2.ed.gov/about/offices/list/ope/index.html

But I guess Sec. King depended on you to know that already. As a new leader, it would of been kind of him to point you to where you could find more out if you wanted from the labyrinth Dept. of Ed is. Instead he points you to a research paper. (that is another ‘dependent truth’ for later).

Once you are in the OPE website pages, you can find this declaration
OPE works to strengthen the capacity of colleges and universities to promote reform, innovation and improvement in post-secondary education, promote and expand access to post-secondary education and increase college completion rates for America’s students, and broaden global competencies that drive the economic success and competitiveness of our Nation.”

How does the OPE pull this off? Lots and lots of programs! There are policy programs (which will shape how reform is carried out), programs to get educational institutions on the reform band wagon, programs for all kinds of students, too..and all chock full of reform under the guise of improving life.

All this leads us to the Second ‘Dependent Truth’: If all the reform and improvements were LEGALLY based and NON Common Core (or any of its other names) aligned, these programs would be better off. BUT, I guess the Dept. of Education depends on the fallacy of our believing them, right?

The Third ‘Dependent Truth’? Simple, policy is NOT law! But I guess no one at the U.S. Dept. of Ed exercised their ‘Captain Obvious’ muscles in this area. The Free Dictionary website stated that policy in relation to governments is intended to influence and determine decisions, actions, and other matters” They also continue on with this, “A course of action, guiding principle, or procedure considered expedient, prudent, or advantageous”. Since we know the U.S. Dept of Ed sides with all things CCSS, we know their dependence is on the ‘truth’ that prudence, advantage, and influence are subjective, NOT objective! The Free Dictionary offers one last definition of ‘policy’, whatever is “shrewdness” is the basic idea. That, my fellow anti CCSS Warriors, is exactly where the CCSS Machine has been focusing on when it comes to ‘dependent truths’! Contrast the definition of ‘policy’ to ‘law’, and I think you will see yet another ‘dependent truth’ being skewed by the CCSS Machine and the U.S. Dept. of Ed!

If you want to see the 2015-16 Negotiated Rules for Higher Education and what this means for your students,

This brings up another ‘dependent truth’: Much of the hype around higher education is the cost of it. Much of the language in these negotiated rules has to deal with student loans. So what ‘dependent truth’ is the U.S. Dept of Ed using (as well as the CCSS Machine)?
Many states are now requiring kids to complete FASFA forms (these are the government financial aid applications) in order to graduate! The U.S. Dept. of Ed is basically hog-tying students to CCSS aligned post-secondary education as well as massive debt!
Because the HEA (Higher Education Act) will be up for re-authorization soon (as I believe it will be due to the ‘success’ of the ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act)). Higher Ed is the LAST link in the “cradle to career alignment” which HAS NOT been cemented by the CCSS Machine.

So what is my point? We know where to look when the negotiations begin! See the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s resource for HOW the rulemaking process is conducted! http://www.regulations.gov/#!documentDetail;D=ED-2015-OPE-0103-0001

Other ‘Dependent Truth’ Participants:

The U.S. Dept. of Ed is hardly the only ‘dependent truth’ entity involved in the education alignment activities. Refer back to the Tweet featured above and you will notice Sec. King is sharing with you a report from another source. What source? What report? Read on, my Warriors!

Jack Kent Cooke  Foundation is the source.
“True Merit” is the report.
Wanna bet how many ‘dependent truths’ we can find?..First, look below at the screen shot from the Foundation’s website. Notice how young the students targeted are. Not post-secondary age, yet, but much younger.
You can access the picture above: http://www.jkcf.org/

According to the website, the Foundation is The Jack Kent Cooke Foundation is a private, independent foundation dedicated to advancing the education of exceptionally promising students who have financial need. The Foundation supports exceptional students from elementary school to graduate school through scholarships, grants, direct service, and knowledge creation and dissemination.”

The Foundation has only been around since 2000 and is based in VA. According to a pdf I found buried in the website, the following is used in determining which students get help, “The Foundation chooses recipients for these awards following a rigorous review process led by independent, expert selection committees. Selection criteria include academic excellence, unmet financial need, will to succeed, leadership and public service, critical-thinking ability, and strong interest in the arts and humanities.” Want to see the pdf? http://www.jkcf.org/assets/1/7/back_matter.pdf

SO here is Cooke’s ‘first dependent truth’: “Research shows: There is a profound and widening excellence gap through elementary and secondary school.” Their second ‘dependent truth’ is(also from research): “High-achieving, low-income students are less likely to pursue rigorous coursework or to score highly on achievement tests.” I guess they are depending on the truth that their research left out how poorly ALL students are doing in both these areas due to CCSS and all that goes with it! Cooke has many more ‘dependent truths’ where I found these two beauties. It is on their ‘Guiding Principles’ page. Among them you will find why students must be academically engaged during, after and through summers to perform well.

Another of  Cooke’s ‘dependent truths’: Their Community College Initiative. As I have shared with you in the past, community colleges across the nation are aligned to CCSS via the CTE (Career Tech Education) and its paths. From the document detailing this Initiative, here is an excerpt, “The Foundation issued $6.8 million in grants to the institutions to increase the number of high achieving, low‐income community college transfer students at the participating four‐ year colleges and universities. The grants would enable the institutions to foster programs, policies, and partnerships with community colleges to improve student preparation, assistance with admission and financial aid processes, orientation and “bridge” programs, and post‐admission support. The eight institutions were Amherst College, Bucknell University, Cornell University, Mount Holyoke College, University of California, Berkeley, University of Michigan, University of North Carolina‐Chapel Hill, and University of Southern California. To evaluate the CCTI, the Foundation selected the Center for Youth and Communities at Brandeis University’s Heller School for Social Policy and Management.”

Their research team? Another ‘dependent truth’:  “Prior to awarding the CCTI grants, the Foundation, in collaboration with the Lumina Foundation and the Nellie Mae Education Foundation, commissioned research…” If you would like the entire Report, CookeCCTI

Before we leave Cooke, you need to know the Tweet Sec. King made was not referring to this Report, but Cooke’s latest, called “True Merit”.
Before I share True Merit’s document, here is the fancy, You Tube video to sell us on this idea the U.S. Dept. of Ed is embracing and tweeting about: 

Some of the ‘dependent truths’ in “True Merit”:
1) SAT/ACT prep and courses, assessments
2) Under served student populations (just a few days ago I wrote how the ESSA used this phrase in the language for purposed CCSS/CTE alignment)
3)  Student funding
4) CCSS/CTE/CCR aligned post-secondary education institutions which include Harvard, MIT, and others
5) Educational Longitude Studies and other data mining
6) School counselor guidance (I have also exposed the White House Initiative concerning school counselors and their purposed alignment to CCSS/CTE in the past.)
7) AP/IB courses and assessments
Get the entire document: JKCF_True_Merit_Report

If you are not sure how Lumina and Nellie Mae are part of the CCSS Machine and where their ‘dependent truths’ are, see:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/?s=Lumina and
I will suggest you search out Emily Talmadge’s website for her look into Nellie Mae. Her website: http://emilytalmage.com/

One last resource I found within the OPE of the Dept. of Ed and pertains to ‘dependent truths’ for higher education ties AIR (American Institutes of Research) into the alignment efforts in America! See: http://nces.ed.gov/pubs2012/2012046.pdf


Well, my Warriors Against the Core, you can see we have lots to look into in the coming days concerning higher education and the continued quest of aligning every educational choice to that of the CCSS Machine.

Remember to join me tomorrow morning on the Negdog Radio (a BlogTalk Radio Station) as we take a look into the College and Career Readiness Centers located across the nation. You can find Negdog Radio (FL based):
My host has devoted 11:30 am to 1:30 pm Eastern Standard Time for War vs the Core Wednesdays. You can listen in or call in with questions, 347-843-4165. Shows are archived as well. Then join me again on Women on the Wall national phone call, 8:30 pm, Central Standard Time. That call in number is: 302-202-1110, code 702165.



Tech Thursday: Post Secondary Champs?

What every US citizen said they always wanted... NOT!
What every US citizen said they always wanted… NOT!

For today’s “Tech Thursday” article, I want to shine the light on the CCSS alignment in post-secondary education yet again. Shouldn’t my focus be on the re-authorization of the ESEA (Elementary and Secondary Education Act)? While the focus is on that (my last 2 published articles were devoted to the ESEA re-authorization push), we need to understand the upcoming push to re-authorize the HEA (Higher Education Act) is ALSO in need of our attention. Why? The CCSSI (Common Core State Standards Initiative) depends on a TOTAL alignment, from pre-K to grad school, to be complete! In my researching the subject, I know the CCSS Machine (all the efforts put into motion by the CCSSI) cannot succeed with only a pre-K to 12th grade movement. It HAS to encompass ALL education for it to succeed. It is my goal, since I began researching and speaking out, to foil those actions as much as possible! So, what can I shine the light today? Read on, my fellow Warriors….

‘Career Readiness Champs’ to Them, ‘Chumps’ to Me:

The CCSS Machine has churned out many names to confuse and detract the general public from the fact that no matter what name it stuck on their modern education reforms, it’s STILL Common Core aligned! Case in point, ‘career readiness’, ‘college and career readiness’, “CTE, Career Tech Education”, “Career Pathways”, and so on. While the War Against the Core is raging on in the K-12 arena, movements in the post-secondary realm are continuing on. It is my belief that is exactly what the CCSS Machine wants. For us to be so attentive to only one portion of the reform, we don’t notice the reform efforts in birth to 5 years, or the post-secondary areas. Did you know that more and more states are establishing now (or have established in the past) CRIs (Career Readiness Initiatives)??
Yes, it’s true. California as of 2/15 has established such, see:
 http://www.cde.ca.gov/eo/in/cr/ However, since I don’t live in CA, but NC, I’m going to use NC as my example for the most part to see what moves the CCSS Machine has made here. As you know, using what I have found can help you look in your state for the same type of movements. Below, you can find some of the CCR champs/chumps.

Champ/Chump #1: NC’s Career Readiness Certification Organization:

The website: http://www.crcnc.org/info/AboutCRC.aspx
The goal:North Carolina ’s Career Readiness Certification (CRC) is designed to meet the needs of both employers and job seekers in this transitioning economy. 

·        For employers, the CRC offers a reliable means of determining whether a potential employee has the necessary literacy, numeracy and problem solving skills to be “job ready.” 

·        For job seekers, the CRC serves as a portable credential that can be more meaningful to employers than a high school degree or a resume citing experience in a different job setting.

The CRC is based upon WorkKeys, a nationally recognized, skills assessment tool developed by ACT Inc.” {*Note: I’ve written about the WorkKeys assessments many times, if you’d like those links, let me know.}

Since we know the WorkKeys is tied to career paths, the CRC uses WDBs (Workforce Developments Boards) and other P3 information (public, private partnerships) to help you search the CRC’s “Talent Pipeline”, see: http://www.crcnc.org/search/geosearch3.aspx
Along with these alignments and P3 participation, you have business owners and managers chiming in on what a great champion all this CCSS/CTE/CRC alignment is. See it in their own words, http://www.crcnc.org/info/Quotes.aspx

Is the NC CRC the only group of its kind in NC? No, we need to look at the NC New Schools Rural Education work, too. You can find them at: http://ncnewschools.org/national-rural-education-initiative-to-improve-college-and-career-readiness/ Did you notice the web address included ‘national rural education’? NC is embedding it out in 6 school districts, however, SC, MS, and other states are set to reap a champion ‘bumper crop’ as well.
Here’s an excerpt, “Students in rural areas of Illinois, Indiana, Mississippi and South Carolina will soon have greater access to college- and career-readiness efforts through the Rural Innovative Schools initiative, funded by a $20 million federal grant and additional private investment. The initiative is led by Breakthrough Learning, the national brand of NC New Schools, which is also implementing the work in six North Carolina school districts.”
If you’d like to know how many of our tax dollars the US Dept of Ed spent and what other ‘private’ donations were made, read below:
“The U.S. Department of Education last fall awarded the initiative a five-year, $20 million grant to develop new college and career readiness and college access opportunities for students in rural communities. The grant represents the only “scale-up” grant awarded under the recent Investing in Innovation (i3) initiative, which aims to develop innovative approaches to improve student achievement and replicate effective strategies nationwide. An additional $4.2 million in funding will be raised jointly over the five-year initiative by Breakthrough Learning and participating districts and states. Investment partners in the Rural Innovative Schools scale-up initiative currently include: AT&T Aspire, Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina, Carnegie Corporation of New York, ChildTrust, Edward M. Armfield Sr. Foundation, Golden LEAF Foundation, Goodnight Educational Foundation, NC Electric Membership Corporation, SAS, Wells Fargo Foundation and the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation.

Champs/chumps #2: In case you didn’t know it New Schools is a Gates Foundation backed organization. See:
If you’ve not seen the Gates Foundation’s CCR work, see: 
http://www.gatesfoundation.org/search#q/k=career readiness

Since the Gates Foundation is a well known member of the CCSS Machine, it won’t be hard to connect the dots there. New Schools are in several cities and states across the nation, so they should be easy to connect to the CCSS Machine as well.

Champs/Chumps #3: Bring on the CCSSO (Council of Chief State School Officers):

In case you’ve not seen there Task Force on CCR, you can read it all by accessing:
See below for the members of the Task Force, among them? Many states and pro CCSS/CRTE groups!

So, How Does All This Tie to the HEA (HIgher Education Act)?

As I’ve shared in the past about the current HEA and the proposed updates, the bridge between secondary education and post-secondary needs to be streamlined (I’ve written about those bridges before and pointed you to the documented ‘research’ churned out by not only the Gates Foundation, but others as well. If you missed those articles, let me know, I’ll be happy to share them again.) The ways in which post-secondary educational institutions are to be graded and governed in also in the proposed updates. See the Education Commission of the States report: ECSBlueprint ( the Commission is a nation wide one, not a NC specific one) The report shares how the P-20W data (pre-school to grad school or Workforce) plays into the situation as well. P-20w is in the HEA, too!
(*Note: the Education Commission of the States has detailed legislative records of each of the 50 States in America. I was curious if I could find a ‘champ/chump’ example. I did! Under the “Career/Technical Education” tab for NC, I found where CCSS aligned post-secondary education was signed into law! See below:

To find your post-secondary champs/chumps: http://ecs.org/state-legislation-by-state/
To find your post-secondary champs/chumps:

Others involved?
1) If you’d like to see the NACEP (National Alliance for Concurrent Enrollment Partnership) joint report with Jobs for the Future (2013)on  what needs to be done to further the CCSS Machine (mainly through STEM: Science, Technology, Engineering, and, Math) push into post-secondary education, see: http://nacep.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/12/HEA-joint-policy-recs-Bard-NACEP-JFF-August-2013.pdf
Jobs for the Future’s CCSS ties? There are plenty, use this link to find their ‘research’:
NACEP’s CCSS ties? See Strategy #1, objective #2: http://www.nacep.org/about-nacep/strategic-plan/

2) If  you’d like the document tying Lumina, Gates Foundation, and other well known CCSS Machine members where the goal is engaging higher education institutions in aligning to CCSS, see: http://rockpa.org/document.doc?id=232 (*Note: this one’s worth downloading before it disappears)

3) Helping write the re-authorization the HEA are some of the same members of Congress who’ve embedded so much pro CCSS language in the re-authorization combination of the HR5 and the S1177 (Student Success Act; Every Child Achieves Act)! These are all champs to the pro side of CCSS/CTE/CCR, but to the rest of us? Just a bunch of power hungry, sold out to the CCSS Machine chumps!

Tech Thursday: Adult CCSS Reading

Today's article uncovers the almost $10 million dollar grant for adult literacy.
Today’s article uncovers the almost $10 million dollar grant for adult literacy.

Would you believe an almost $10 million dollar grant given to the National Research and Development Centers was given back in 2012 and ends in 2017? Would you believe it’s tied to Common Core ELA? Would you believe it’s geared for ADULTS both in the USA and Canada? Read on, my Warriors!

The Grant:

You can find the grant information by following this link: http://ies.ed.gov/funding/grantsearch/details.asp?ID=1343
The government organization awarding this money? The IES (Institute for Educational Sciences)
How much money was awarded? Exactly $9,999,985.00!
The institution receiving all that dough? Georgia State University.
The purpose? Research and Development for Adult Literacy. Here’s an excerpt about the purpose, “The Center for the Study of Adult Literacy (CSAL) seeks to improve our understanding of ways to advance the reading skills of struggling adult learners reading at the 3rd to 8th grade levels. The Center will both conduct exploratory work on underlying cognitive and motivational processes that contribute to or impede reading development and develop and evaluate a multi-component reading intervention for this population. In addition, CSAL will examine the adequacy of measurement instruments and assessments for this population. CSAL is a collaborative effort across four research sites: Atlanta, Georgia; Memphis, Tennessee; and Toronto and St. Catharines, Canada. Struggling adult readers in both the United States and Canada will participate.”

Now, it’s important to point out that staff members of CSAL include experts in childhood and adult education, psychometrics, educational technology, and statistics. Helping all this reading intervention along? AIR (American Institutes for Research)! How did I discover that pro CCSS/CTE backing group? On the grant project’s website. (see: http://csal.gsu.edu/content/homepage)

Before we proceed, I want to highlight the incentous relationship between the IES, the CSAL, the NCER, and the U.S. Dept. of Education. First, you have the head: the U.S. Dept. of Education, follow that with the IES as the neck. Then, two arms, one for the NCER and the other for the CSAL. So, what you have is lots of money staying within the U.S. Dept. of Ed, but in different arms of it. Confused yet?! Don’t fret, the bottom line is that money is being used for adult literacy educational reform. But..it is Common Core ELA? Let’s press on…
(*Note: If you’d like to see ALL the related ‘body parts’ of the IES, see: http://ies.ed.gov/ncer/randd/ Be sure to look at all the current research grant programs going on)
The Fact Sheet:

If you want the ‘facts’, here’s a link for you. This one takes you to the flyer GSU and the rest of the grant project have put together. See: http://csal.gsu.edu/sites/csal.gsu.edu/files/CSAL_Factsheet_2015.pdf
Here are just two of the ‘facts’ I’ll share, you can read the rest of them on your own.
1) A curriculum is being written for learners to use.
2) A computer program will teach them to read.

The Common Core/CTE?:

Okay, so far, we’ve gotten the U.S. Dept. of Education and some of its sub-departments, so we know that’s ONE aspect of CCSS/CTE (Common Core State Standards/Career Technical Education); we’ve seen that AIR’s connected, so that’s a SECOND aspect of alignment. But..is there more?!  Oh yes, my anti CCSS Warriors, there most certainly is! Where did I find those featured below? On the website of the almost $10 million grant project!

“Equipped for the Future” from the University of Tennessee (see: http://eff.clee.utk.edu/)
To see the executive summary of how aligned EFF is to the CCSS: EFFUT

“Council for the Advancement of Adult Literacy” (CAAL), based in New York, NY. (see: http://www.caalusa.org/about.html)
To see how CCSS/CTE bound this group is, be sure to read the portion of the website’s homepage where Carnegie Foundation and the Ford Foundation are given credit for helping create the Council. More CCSS/CTE pro supportive groups also give lots of money to the Council (see: http://www.caalusa.org/funders.html). There you’ll see some of the most familiar CCSS funders like Lumina, Verizon, the Joyce Foundation, and many more.
Among the CAAL publications, is this ‘gem’. It’s all about the data mining for Career Pathways! (CP is another part of the Career Tech Education)Please note that the published date is 2010, before the GED was aligned, before the Longitudinal Data Collection systems were united. Also of note, the CLASP(Center for Law and Social Policy) is mentioned in the footnotes concerning data mining. I’ve written about CLASP before to expose their CCSS/CTE ties. See this article: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/19/tech-thursday-ccss-workforce-pushing-labor-reform/
To see the CAAL publication: LongitudinalCoreTrackingElements-Indicators52710

“Commission on Adult Basic Education” (COABE), based in Syracuse, NY.
(see: http://www.coabe.org/)

To see their CCSS/CTE allegiance, just look at the screen shot below:

When I took this screen shot, the words were changing from
When I took this screen shot, the words were changing from “Test Ready, Future Prepared” to “Now Available the College and Career Readiness Standards”.

This Commission has around 13, 000 members devoted  “To promote adult education and literacy programs, including Adult Basic Education, Adult Secondary Education, English for Speakers of Other Languages, Family Literacy, Skills Development, Workforce Development, and other state, federal, and private programs which assist undereducated and/or disadvantaged adults to function effectively.” If you’d like to read the rest of the Commission’s mission, see: http://www.coabe.org/mission/
If you look around the website a bit more, you’ll see the USA is divided into regions.
You’ll also find their new publication about “New Pathways” which details how the COABE is embracing the WIOA’s(Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014) education/workforce alignment. (in other words, MORE Common Core Career Tech and Pathways). See: COABE_stratg_broch_v4

“Center for Applied Linguistics” based in Washington, D.C.
See: http://www.cal.org/
This group (non profit) has an entire Common Core State Standards section. See: http://www.cal.org/content/search?SearchText=common+core+state+standards
Founded in 1959 with a Ford Foundation grant, CAL is very supportive of the CCSS/CTE.
Be sure to access their 2014 Annual Report where you can find out that this group impacts K-12 educators, those working with immigrants and refugees, and how they are helping with the ‘next generation of assessments’. See: http://www.cal.org/who-we-are/annual-reports

Are there others groups like the ones above? Yes, there are. I’ll be looking up close at them in a later, not yet written article.


While all the information above is certainly very revealing about how in-depth the CCSS/CTE Machine is going beyond K-12, I want to re-direct your attention to one of my very first anti CCSS blog articles where the CCSS Adult Standards were shared.

How does it all interconnect? Simply put: the Common Core curriculum

Tech Thursday: More Alexander, HEA, and the Next America

Part two of the look at the recent conference discussing the re-authorization of the Higher Education Act.
Part two of the look at the recent conference discussing the re-authorization of the Higher Education Act.

In today’s post, we pick up where the CCSS/CTE trail left off from yesterday. That is the “Next America” Conference held recently. Sen. Alexander, Ted Mitchell, and the others you see above all spoke. We looked at Mr. Mitchell’s speech yesterday. Today, it is an opportunity to hear what the Senator said. We’ll also look at what the panel had to share as well. Will there by more Common Core/Career and Technical Education speak?

The Video Archive of the Conference:

Once again, here’s the You Tube video of the conference hosted by “National Journal”, the Gates Foundation, and Lumina.

Sen. Alexander’s portion of the Conference begins at the 1 hour, 23 minute mark. Interestingly enough, his speech isn’t nearly as long as his predecessor, Ted Mitchell, but his speech is full of things we anti CCSS Warriors need to know…and fight. If you missed part one (Mr. Mitchell’s speech and a brief look at the hosts of the “Next America” conference [exposes their ties to the CCSS Machine], see: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/10/wybi-sen-alexander-the-hea-and-next-america/)

Pride Goes Before a Fall:

One thing we’ve seen in those pushing the CCSS/CTE legislation, is their pride in the belief that all this reform and alignment is the greatest thing since sliced bread. IF the person is a politician, the pride factor of how they’ve been key to this is doubled. Below are the key times and CCSS/CTE catch phrases from Sen. Alexander. His speech begins with a ‘gloom and doom’ statement about America being 5 million jobs short by 2020 because we won’t have enough properly skilled post-secondary trained graduates. (as stated above, Alexander’s speaking begins at the 1 hour, 23 minute mark).

From that point to near 1:25, Alexander condemns K-12 education as well as give you a brief history lesson about post secondary education. Then, three key agenda items to be written into the re-authorized version of  the Higher Education Act (HEA).
1) reduce the red tape which regulates Higher Ed
2) stop the ‘kids can’t afford college’ lie
3) make college more affordable
(*Note: when you see this, notice what document he holds up with pride. It’s the ‘blueprint’ for exactly how this 3 top priorities (he’ll go on to tell you the blueprint has 59 changes). If you don’t have this blueprint, you need it. It is full of just how CCSS/CTE friendly the HEA will become. See: Regulations_Task_Force_Report_2015_FINAL Be sure to listen for the other key legislators the Senator keeps naming. We need to look further into their part in all this (at a later time).

1:27-1:32, you’ll hear how those top 3 priorities are now suddenly 5 steps. Be sure to listen for the Medicare funding connection; the filling out the FASFA (which would be re-named) in your students junior year of high school (‘we must get them started even earlier’); how College Board’s opinion is of importance; and how ‘free’ (or ‘nearly free’) colleges can be.
(*Note: The Senator will compare student loans to car loans to make his points)

Alexander’s speech ends at 1:34. Then, it’s on to the one-on-one talk with one of the hosts. This is the part of the video you need to have a piece of paper and something to write with.

1:35 his work with Sen. Murray to fix NCLB by Sept. 2015
He also mentions the “Fast Act”.(see: http://www.help.senate.gov/imo/media/doc/Final_draft_Onepager%20for%20fin%20aid%20bill%20with%20Bennet.pdf)

1:36 getting all this new technology into post-secondary education
1:38 (and several other times) ‘skin in the game’ reference. This relates to having colleges join in on student debts.
1:39 broadening incentives to colleges
1:40 broadening mandates with incentives (uses TN’s community colleges as an example)
1:41 that ‘other’ white paper on student data collection
1:43 refers to Ted Mitchell (US Dept of Ed)’s college rating system and data collection
1:44 listen for the ‘ax grinding’ or grudge that Alexander displays toward the U.S. Dept. of Ed and how he now can address it via legislation.
1:45 repeats broadening incentives
1:46 admits he blocked votes
1:47 mentions Elizabeth Warren’s plan for public college and debt free students
1:48 ‘free’ or ‘nearly free’; ‘average’ (all referring to the cost of college. I’m not sure how much college costs have been studied by the Senator or his staff. The figures he gives are ridiculously low)

The Assorted Other Speakers at Next America:

As in part one, I shared with you how the Gates Foundation and Lumina were both not only hosts of the Conference, but speakers as well. I encouraged you to look at each of the biographies for these assorted members of the panel. It is at the 1 hour, 50 minutes mark, the balance of those featured in the above picture, gather to speak about all that’s been shared thus far. If you’re looking for indoctrinated talk, you’re in for a treat. The Q/A begins with modern innovations in the classroom.

1:56 ‘lots the federal government CAN do and SHOULD do.’
(*Note: start counting how many times ‘outcome based’ education or funding is used from this point on.)

Other statements you’ll want to know were spoken:
*Having employers become part of the post-secondary accreditation mix so that college is relevant and can respond to businesses.
*Need for more data heaviness
*Culture shift in higher education
*How more states are participating in performance education based funding and how many more should be participating.
*Data learning outcome based statistics
*STEM degrees
*No quick track for education/graduation
*Collecting student/school data and publicizing it
*Risk taking by colleges; federal government pushing institutions to comply (‘islands of excellence’)
*Have or re-vamp existing ‘outcome based education framework’
*Get that degree any way you can
*Data-lifting the student ban
*College degrees to better help graduates in the Work Force

Related resources NOT part of the Conference:

1) The 2006 Spellings Report for Higher Education (see how much of the CCSS/CTE main themes are in this older report): 2006 hea spellings
2) The ‘Realignment of High School’ (with the ESEA rewrite and the HEA rewrite being overseen by the same education reformer, we need to see how much of what’s reported here is part/parcel of the newer versions of the ESEA/HEA)
3) Gates Foundation’s post-secondary agenda items (how many of these will end up in legislation?) Gates Higher Ed policies
4) The House of Representatives HEA paper: hea_whitepaper


As a follow up to today’s article, be sure to read the “Fib-o-Meter” Friday article coming tomorrow. I’ll connect the dots on how community colleges (so overstressed in this conference as the answer America needs) are so entrenched with CCSS/CTE.

WYBI: Sen. Alexander, the HEA, and Next America

One of the featured speakers at yesterday's conference (sponsored by Lumina and the Gates) was Sen. Alexander.
One of the featured speakers at yesterday’s conference (sponsored by Lumina and the Gates) was Sen. Alexander.

Sen. Alexander has been a huge supporter of aligning education for quite some time, especially where CCSS?CTE are concerned. He’s presently rewriting both the HR5 AND the HEA legislation which will impact (and align) everyone from K-College. Mr. Mitchell, with the U.S. Dept. of Ed has also been at work (quietly) on 5 agenda driven initiatives concerning education. What’s ironic is that while Alexander’s been getting a lot of press, Mitchell has been continuing on in helping the CCSS Machine roll on. Today’s post is Mr. Mitchell’s turn to be featured. (*Note: we’ll look at Sen. Alexander’s portion of this conference in Thursday’s ‘Tech Thursday’ post) So, let’s find out just what Mr. Mitchell shared with the “Next America” folks

I’ve included the host group’s history for you, as it also needs some anti CCSS warrior attention.


National Journal Media, the Group Hosts for “Next America”:

First, a bit of history.  If you don’t know what publication the “NJ” is, the website for the National Journal, states the following: National Journal is regarded as the most influential publication in Washington, providing more than 3 million influentials in public policy and business with the insights they need to make government work.  Fiercely honest and scrupulously non-partisan, National Journal has a four-decade history of serving leaders in Washington—and around the country—with trustworthy, in-depth analysis on legislation, politics, and the structural trends shaping America.
(website address: http://www.nationaljournal.com/nj/about-us-20131001)

If you’re curious as to who owns the National Journal, it’s the Atlantic Media Group. AMG also owns the “Atlantic” magazine (and others). The leadership of the “Atlantic” has proven very friendly toward CCSS. (*Note: here’s an excerpt from my Sept. 2014 article about the Technocratic grasp for education. “The Atlantic Media owner is a favorite featured guest of the Aspen Institute (which has invested over $3 million in Common Core). Aspen, another group pushing Common Core. Aspen also is a big pusher for technology in the classroom. Just this past week, 9/16/14, the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s Deputy Secretary, Jim Shelton,  was the featured speaker. (See, http://www.aspeninstitute.org/about/blog/impact-of-technology-in-the-classroom-q-and-a-with-jim-shelton”  To access the entire article, https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/21/rmt-sunday-technocratic-education-design/)

As far as the event held on the 9th of June, NJ proudly announced it was underwriting the conference. (To see more about all the NJ hosted events, be sure to read the bottom left corner of the link to access the conference video.


Ted Mitchell and a Panel of Speakers:



On the website page with this picture you can get a brief biography and all the contact information you could want. I urge you to look at each one’s biography.
From Mitchell’s bio:
 “To spur education, economic growth, and social prosperity, Mitchell is charged with planning and policy responsibilities to implement President Obama’s goal for the U.S. to have “the best educated, most competitive workforce in the world” as measured by the proportion of college graduates by the year 2020. Mitchell and his team are keenly focused on implementing President Obama’s American Graduation Initiative to improve college access, affordability, quality, and completion.  Mitchell is the former CEO of the NewSchools Venture Fund and served as the president of the California State Board of Education.

Can you see the potential for Common Core and Career Technical Education here? I can!
To see all the biographies and how they are fitting with the alignment of our education/nation to fit the CCSS Machine’s plan, visit: http://www.nationaljournal.com/events/the-next-america-taking-stock-50-years-of-the-higher-education-act-20150609

The Conference video:

In its entirety, the Conference is 2 hours and 34 minutes. Subtract from that the first 23, almost 24 minutes of introductory music, you have plenty of time to hear the modern education reform battle cry from more than one person. Leading the charge is Mr. Mitchell, the undersecretary for the U.S. Dept. of Education. The actual dialogue begins at about 26:51. (between the first 24 minutes and now, you’re encouraged to follow the Conference on social music with #NJNextAmerica; see: https://twitter.com/search?q=%23NJNextAmerica&src=tyah)

Ted Mitchell’s Speech highlights:

During Mr. Mitchell’s time, he extols the virtues of the ESEA and the HEA; how they are forever joined and how each is a ‘moral imperative’ (see the 27:40 mark). From this point until the 28:50 mark, you’ll hear about the national credentials in education. Following this are the buzzwords ‘pipeline’, ‘equity’, ‘opportunity’. Then at the 29: 04 mark, you’ll hear the buzzword ‘rigorous’ immediately followed by ‘college and career ready’. What could be better, you ask? How about ‘modernizing education via standards and assessments’?Then by the 29:25 time mark, Mr. Mitchell has successfully told the audience that all his previous claims can be ‘deepened by the HEA’.

From this point on you’ll hear some of the following catch phrases or programs. I urge you to take the time to listen to Mitchell’s speech. It’s followed by a one-on-one interview that is also filled with rhetoric for education reform we’ve become used to.
‘Civil right; civic duty’ patriotic message.  America is experiencing ‘islands of excellence’ and creating a template for the future with universal access for all from down to Pre-K and up to college.’ Not content to end there, Mitchell continues on with ‘early college’ and ‘dual enrollment’; a seamless transition for students from 2 year to 4 year schools and (33:50) reaching the President’s North Star. (*Note: to find out just what the “North Star” is, see:
Near the 34:00 mark, listen for the federal role in technology; 36:00 mark, how Congress is needed to back up the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s efforts completed thus far; ’21st Century Learners’; how much better America is since the Feds took over student loans; how Congress needs to empower the U.S. Dept. of Ed even more; making college as a ‘universal learning’ opportunity just like high schools have become; ‘student outcomes’ or ‘outcome based schools’; ‘evidence based interventions’ and finally ‘skills vs. developmental learning’.

Mr. Mitchell will also bring up one more program he’s pushing for the President. It’s called “First in the World” (it’s near the 40:27 mark). What’s FITW? From the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s website page for the brand new program, The FITW program is designed to support the development, replication, and dissemination of innovative solutions and evidence for what works in addressing persistent and widespread challenges in postsecondary education for students who are at risk for not persisting in and completing postsecondary programs, including, but not limited to, adult learners, working students, part-time students, students from low-income backgrounds, students of color, students with disabilities, and first-generation students.”  To learn more about FITW, see:

(*NOTE: at the 50 minutes mark, Mitchell refers to the ‘blueprint’ for re-authorizing the Higher Education Act. If you’ve not seen that ‘blueprint’, let me know. I shared news about the document on last week’s Women on the Wall conference call. I’ll be happy to share it again.)




Tomorrow, we get to know what CCSS/CTE plans Sen. Alexander shared during this all important conference. Oh, as by the way the Lumina and Gates Foundation not only helped host this event, they weighed in on WHY the HEA needs to be re-authorized as well. Gates’ guy spoke at the 1 hour, 8 minute mark; Lumina’s president spoke at the 1 hour, 14 minute mark.

Sic’ ‘Em Saturday: Using Community Colleges for More ‘Core’

It’s not new news that community colleges are Common Core aligned via either their ‘dual enrollment’ courses (which serve high school students) or the Career Pathways/Career Clusters tracks. However, I have found a new document that gives 21 ways to make the bonds of the CC even STRONGER.

SREB, Southern Regional Education Board:

“The Southern Regional Education Board works with 16 member states to improve public education at every level, from pre-K through Ph.D. A nonprofit, nonpartisan organization, SREB was created in 1948 by Southern governors and legislatures to advance education and improve the social and economic life of the region. Member states are Alabama, Arkansas, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, Oklahoma, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and West Virginia.”

I’ve written about SREB a few times before. so I know how supportive of CCSS they are. Recently, the entity has published a Community College Report. Titled “Community Colleges in the South: Strengthening Readiness and Pathways” The work going into this is the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

As I normally do, I’ll only give you the highlights from the document. You can access the entire document from here to research on your own. What if you live outside of the SREB’s domain? I’ll be sure to show you how to find the Regional Education entity in your area by the time we’re through.

Point #1:
Community colleges are essential to achieving state goals — increasing educational achievement of the population, increasing access and completion, eliminating achievement gaps, closing opportunity gaps, and addressing workforce and economic development objectives. These complex institutions are also flexible, adaptable, affordable, community-based, user friendly and proximate to the state’s population.”

Point #2:
“Community colleges serve students, employers and communities.” (think P3 involvement on hyper-drive)

Point #3:
“SREB’s Community College Commission met several times during 2013 and 2014 to recommend policies and practices to increase students’ college and career readiness through effective community college and K-12 pathways. Composed of community college system leaders, legislators, national experts and others.” Below, are the numbers the Report provided:

Point #4:
“In an effort to tighten the connection between state goals and funding, approximately half of the states in the nation are moving to outcomes-based funding. In states such as Ohio, Massachusetts, Nevada, New Mexico, Tennessee and Washington, state support — all or in part — is derived from a funding formula with metrics specifically designed for community colleges. Program designs in most states would reward institutions on a range of measures, including rewards for students who reach momentum points such as successful completion of a specified number of credits, transfers, success with underserved populations and at-risk students, completion of STEM (science, technology, engineering, math) programs, as well as completion of certificates and degrees. Programs with higher rates of completion receive incentive funding for contributing to a state’s educational attainment goal. Although now used widely, outcomes-based funding is still controversial…”

Point #5:
Addressing the admittance policies that could be changed, “The urgency to redesign both placement and developmental education is fueled recently by the impending, new college- and career-readiness standards and associated assessments being implemented by most states. These nationwide standards and assessments are more rigorous, especially with respect to reading and writing, and the more demanding assessments most likely will publicly reveal a much more severe readiness problem. To these points, the recent National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP) 12th grade achievement-level results for literacy and math — which apply performance expectations empirically linked to college success and to the new common readiness standards — show that only 38 percent of students perform at or above the Proficient level in reading, and 26 percent perform at the Proficient level in math. Hence, these placement and remedial challenges must be addressed so that colleges and students come closer to meeting the postsecondary completion goals set by most states…” 

Point #6:
“….emphases in the emerging new common college readiness standards, there is a growing call to address the fundamental and logical importance of students being able to read with comprehension moderately complex texts across a variety of content areas.”

Point #7:

Regarding math readiness, “In fact, numerous examples in postsecondary education (public and independent) have resolved this issue by requiring math other than college algebra (or precalculus) as a free-standing degree requirement. For non-STEM majors, many institutions accept, for degree credit, math courses such as finite math, introductory statistics, contemporary math and quantitative reasoning. It is thought that the logical and critical reasoning and thinking skills required for a degree — for future careers and perhaps for successful study in other areas of the curriculum — can be nurtured through rigorous engagement in these courses. The four major math associations (American Mathematical Society, American Statistical Association, Mathematical Association of America, and Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) will issue recommendations this year that college algebra no longer be a general education course requirement.” Not much further down the page the discussion of which math areas would be considered as alternatives, “The construction and implementation of these new approaches to developmental education centering on these courses is proceeding through the work of the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s Quantway and Statway projects and the New Mathways Project from the Charles A. Dana Center at the University of Texas.”

Point #8:
“…placement and readiness evaluation tend to identify and assess literacy skills based on students’ abilities to read texts of moderate- to lower-level complexity, within a narrow range of academic disciplines. Too often, these evaluations do not challenge students’ abilities to read and understand academic or technical texts, or to analyze and explain their meaning in writing. This ability to read more complex text in many subjects is critical to students’ abilities to succeed in postsecondary education. For example, the most commonly used placement tests, Accuplacer and Compass, use relatively simple texts and writing prompts. The lack of challenging literacy readiness standards and assessments explain why math skills have been viewed as the area which most contributes to the readiness problem.” Not too far down the page, “Moreover, many state K-12 systems have adopted new literacy standards, such as the Common Core State Standards and others, that are based on the deep and effective reading of complex information texts across different disciplines and the ability to engage in expository writing that parallels the higher text complexity.”

Point #9:
“Public schools need the direct support of community colleges to meet the immense readiness challenge. Community colleges need to lead in making more students ready for postsecondary education, especially in supporting systematic high school efforts to raise achievement in literacy and math skills. Community colleges need to engage in the following activities jointly with local public schools:  *Send specific, concrete messages about the literacy and math readiness skills needed.  *Support the need for junior-year readiness assessments based on specific readiness skills and standards*Support the provision and required enrollment of students in 12th grade bridge or transition courses based on the literacy and math readiness skills. These courses should be taken by students assessed as not ready by the junior-year assessments and provide a way to move developmental education from the community colleges to K-12.  *Provide concrete, actual examples of first-year community college course work to high schools. SREB will use its convening and advocacy capacity to bring together groups of states to address these recommendations; in light of the controversial nature of the recommendations…”
Point #10:
“One of the most underutilized strategies to support student degree completion is the emphasis on a well-defined, rather narrow pathway that students should adhere to in order to complete an associate or bachelor’s degree in a timely manner.” Not long after you read this, you’ll read this, “A structured guided pathway is an academic program map where faculty have sequenced the courses and identified well-defined learning outcomes. Pathways imply structure and guidance toward timely completion and next steps along the path. Structure and guidance are both important and costly. They include adequate and appropriate advising that focuses on careers and programs, rather than courses, and keeps students on track, requiring them to have a plan and declare a major early. Pathways help students build credit toward a certificate or skill base, should they leave the institution before completing a certificate or degree. They provide the opportunity to take accelerated courses such as dual enrollment and Advanced Placement.” Wait, there’s this as well, “While the definition of a structured or guided pathway may vary somewhat, policy-makers, educators and business leaders agree that postsecondary programs of study that lead to certificates and associate degrees must be better aligned with local, regional, and state workforce needs. Additionally, the programs and courses should be regularly evaluated against workforce needs.”

There is SO much more you need to read in this report! Access it: CommCollegeCom_2015
Of interest: The SREB upcoming College/Career Readiness Conference! Set for July 2015 in Atlanta. (see: http://www.sreb.org/page/1615/CCSSConference.html)
Who funds SREB? Here’s the list of CCSS funders we’ve seen so many times before:
*Alfred P. Sloan Foundation
*Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
*Consolidated Management Resources
*Lamar Plunkett Family
*Lumina Foundation
*National Board of Professional Teaching Standards
*National Research Center for Career and Technical Education, University of Louisville
*National Institutes of Health
*National Science Foundation
*The Pearson Foundation
*U.S. Department of Education

Want to learn more about SREB’s preK-PhD work? http://www.sreb.org/page/1068/about_SREB.html

Other regional Education Boards:
WICHE, Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education: http://www.wiche.edu/
MSC, Multi-State Collaborative: http://www.sheeo.org/projects/msc-multi-state-collaborative-advance-learning-outcomes-assessment#What
NEBHE, New England Board of Higher Education: http://www.nebhe.org/
MHEC, Midwestern Higher Education Compact: http://www.mhec.org/
Consortium of State and Regional Education Research Associations: http://www.srera.org/
American Educational Research Association: http://www.aera.net/

WYBI: CCSS Supporter Profiling Higher Ed Degrees

Back in 2011, The CCS/CTE/CCR (Common Core Standards/Career Tech Ed/College, Career Readiness) and other higher education institutions got a ‘leg up’. Thanks to Lumina’s desire to be a part of the “Goals 2025”. What IS the ‘leg’? What is Goals 2025? How does Lumina play a part in this; better yet, what is Lumina? Come along my friends, fellow anti CCSS Warriors, and associates…We’ve got lots to go over.

Lumina Foundation:

For our more seasoned warriors against CC, we know what Lumina is. However, for those who are new to the war against the Core, Let’s see what kind of foundation Lumina is.
Their website: http://www.luminafoundation.org/ Lumina is private and independent (meaning it’s not for profit, non stockholder group) Their main reason for existence? Getting more Americans into higher education. Their budget to do this? Over $1 billion dollars. To access their fact sheet: http://www.luminafoundation.org/about
On the policy page of the website, here’s the first sentence you’ll read, “Any effort to make meaningful social change is notoriously difficult and inherently risky—and some aspects are too risky for anyone but foundations.” You’ll go on to read how they do not support legislation one way or the other; that they hold the public’s trust. Their leadership influences both federal AND state levels. What a pity all that power and money is devoted to aligning American students to the agenda behind Common Core. Lumina’s been around since 2000.

Profiling Your Degrees:
As stated above, this written report was published in 2011. Lumina enlisted the help of the Institute for Higher Education Policy (IHEP), Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS), a professor and author from Kent State University, and Association of American Colleges & Universities (AAC&U).
From some of the pages, I was able to glean the following points. Quality outcome based education always lends itself to needed assessments; benchmarks for students for all 3 levels of higher learning institutions graduation requirements (meaning associates, bachelors, and masters); the profile will guide both students and instructions in regards to curriculum and lessons so that the students goals and understanding align with the institution they are attending; field specific training and competency based learning are also some of the main goals (I’m not quite sure how that’s higher quality..I mean I want my oldest daughter about to enter grad school to MASTER her field. After all, it is called a “Masters Degree” and not a “Competency Degree”!)
Here’s a visual of how this is to look (you’ll need to enlarge it):

The 5 areas? Applied Skills, Civic Skills, Broad/Integrative Knowledge,Specialized Knowledge, and Intellectual Skills
The 5 areas? Applied Skills, Civic Skills, Broad/Integrative Knowledge,Specialized Knowledge, and Intellectual Skills

Here’s the PDF. Please, research it. There is much more to be learned in this document. While it was published 5 years ago, it should give you a better understanding how and why higher learning institutions are becoming more and more common. They have to be, look at the CCSS Machine. It relies on total alignment from PreK to Career. The_Degree_Qualifications_Profile
Goals 2025:

This initiative relies on outcome based education. It operates on the premises that by the year 2025, America should have a 60% higher education graduation rate. While that doesn’t sound so bad, remember Lumina’s all about CCSS/CTE/CCR. Even their description of the Goals 2025 uses the phrase ‘obtain a high quality degree or credential’. This program began in 2009. If you looking for more of the same old rhetoric about global achievement and where we supposedly lag; how America MUST be globally competitive; how business need skill-based workers…then this is your jackpot! This Goals 2025 initiative also has all the redesigns for those 21st century learners, too. Gee, aren’t we lucky?! You see by having more graduates, we’ll have a better socially gifted country, we’ll have better economics, too. Of course, all this will have to be conducted in the ‘Even Steven’ fashion. God forbid we should let anyone NOT attain a high quality degree or credentials. By the way, just WHOM or what entity ensures these degrees and credentials are worth more than the paper they’re printed on? According to Lumina’s 2013-2016 Strategy Plan for Goals 2025, THEY WILL! Access the Strategy:

University Innovation Alliance:


This brainchild is funded by not only the Lumina Foundation, but the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation as well. Website: http://www.theuia.org/#home You won’t find the above fact on the website, in plain sight. No, access the Prospectus ( UIA-Vision-Prospectus ) This document will not only give you ‘facts’ and figures, but you’ll be able to see how, as this Alliance grows, more involvement with ‘subject experts’, technology, and other public, private partners will be a great thing. You’ll also see the memo sent to the U.S. Dept. of Ed for their input toward the re-authorization of the HEA (Higher Education Act).

Here’s the YouTube Video for the Alliance which I found on Lumina’s website:

Lastly, Lumina’s Common Core Devotion:

Connecting K-12 and Higher Ed via the CCSS:

Guiding schools and school districts toward successful implementation of the Standards:

Here’s the Heartland Institute’s report on the biggest foundations fund CCSS. Lumina is among them.

From the Stop Common Core NC website, this article on how Lumina helped fund a “NC Ready for Success” program.

From the SREB, Southern Regional Educational Board, their account of how they are working with Lumina. Note, you’ll see the Gates Foundation there, as well.

From Oregon’s “Core to College” website, how Lumina and the big members of the CCSS Machine, are involved in several states with this same program. (Note: 2011 is when all this began).

FYI: Most of Lumina’s money, if not all of it, comes from the sale of it’s original company to Sallie Mae. As in THE Sallie Mae and student loans. You see, Lumina began its life as USA Group. USA Group is what Sallie Mae acquired.
Here’s a press release: http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/sallie-mae-completes-usa-group-transaction-new-executives-and-board-members-named-72598737.html

NY Times stated this transaction took place in 2000. Their article states $770 million. So how Lumina’s been able to turn that into billions? I don’t think we need to guess too hard. http://www.nytimes.com/2000/06/16/business/company-news-sallie-mae-agrees-to-buy-usa-group-for-770-million.html

I’ll be looking more in depth at some of the other groups mentioned above which helped Lumina with the Degree overhaul. Stay tuned for the follow up!

Tech Thursday: Common Core Military Special

Normally on Thursdays, I treat you to an article about Common Core in post secondary education. Today, however, I’ve got a special article. Collaborative for Student Success has just released a new infograph about Common Core and our U.S. Military students.

What you don’t see below is the staggering number of students set to be in the direct line of fire for receiving CCSS in military schools. Eighty-two thousand (82,000).
Outside those military families, look at those students wishing to get in the military, no matter where they attended high school, a CCSS laden exam awaits (more on that later). As far as not having enough students qualify to to join the military upon graduation from high school? I found one article which suggests the reason isn’t because of education, but because the recruiters don’t need as many service men and women, so they can be a bit more choosy in selecting new members of the armed forces! Something the Collaborative folks left out in their infograph. (see: https://news.vice.com/article/the-common-core-military-readiness-and-the-myth-of-americas-dumb-youth)

Get the full inforgraph: http://forstudentsuccess.org/why-military-students-deserve-high-standards/
Get the full inforgraph:

From 2003:

A document I found on the State Dept.’s website caused me to pose a question. Could the ‘common core curriculum and programs’ developed for the military training be the same as the CCSS of today? I’ve provided a screen shot where you’ll be able to see how some funding was being used. While I’ve not been able to actually see the curriculum, it does leave a question for us.

To see the entire file: http://www.state.gov/documents/organization/9468.pdf
To see the entire file:

Why this question is of concern:

While the above may or may not be THE CCSS, it should concern us. Why? If you look at some of the courses taught in the Civilian Military Naval Post Grad School, you’ll see that the United Nations plays a huge role in it; you’ll see that legislators are involved in some of the classes as well. How do I know this? As an example, take a look at the Naval Post Grad School. Knowing that the UN is behind CCSS and has recently (as in yesterday) been pushing for more CCSS globally, we should be very concerned! We should be finding out all we can!!
(see: http://www.thenewamerican.com/culture/education/item/20657-un-pushes-common-core-style-global-education-regime)

To see the Civilian-Military Courses: http://calhoun.nps.edu/bitstream/handle/10945/41974/CCMR_Courses_2002-01-01.pdf?sequence=1
To see the Civilian-Military Courses:

Army Supports the CCSS:
Read the statement from the head of U.S. Army in full support of CCSS. Hasn’t anyone told him as a defender of the U.S. Constitution, support for the Core is treason?


Dept. of Defense Backs the Core:
Read the Rand Corp. book detailing how the DofD has implemented CCSS into military schools. Again, why are those who took an oath to uphold the Constitution even considering such an act of internal hostility??http://www.rand.org/pubs/occasional_papers/OP384.html

If you aren’t familiar with Rand, here’s their description from their website, “The RAND Corporation is a research organization that develops solutions to public policy challenges to help make communities throughout the world safer and more secure, healthier and more prosperous. RAND is nonprofit, nonpartisan, and committed to the public interest.” What’s ironic is that Rand prides itself on fact based research. How in the bloody heck can you even consider CCSS fact based research when so much has been proven to be totally undeserving of being used?! While copyright protection bars me from sharing the Rand 2014 Annual Report, what I CAN share is where to access it. I can also tell you to read the section on education (begins on page 12) and then refer to the list of donors who supported Rand in 2014. You’ll find the complete list on page 64. Count the well known CCSS supporters. Then, check out some of the others to see if they, too, support the Core. http://www.rand.org/pubs/corporate_pubs/CP1-2014.html

Collaborative for Student Success:

If you look at the Collaborative more in-depth (http://forstudentsuccess.org/) You’ll see all kinds of support for CCSS. Here’s one of 4 main screen pictures you’ll see:


To see the video where the Major praises the CCSS:

Who Backs the Collaborative? See the list of CCSS Shameful:

  • The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation
  • Carnegie Corporation of New York
  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Helios Education Foundation
  • Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust
  • William and Flora Hewlett Foundation
  • Lumina Foundation
  • The Charles and Lynn Schusterman Family Foundation

Who is in the Collaborative?

“The members of the Collaborative share the belief that the successful implementation of the Common Core State Standards is an important next step in ensuring that all students are prepared to succeed at college level work. The mission of the Collaborative is to support the state-led efforts of State Education Agencies and local education organizations responsible for educating and informing all stakeholders — parents, students, teachers and community leaders — about the new state standards and assessments. There is great support for the Common Core State Standards among educators – from the National Network of State Teachers of the Year, the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics to the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards, the National Education Association and the American Federation of Teachers.”

So much for objective facts about CCSS!

Related to Those in Military Families:
See my fellow warrior, LadyLiberty1885’s article about the military and CCSS:

See Achieve, Inc.’s thumbs up for CCSS:

The Daily Caller has an article about all the military branches and CCSS:

Related to Those Wishing to Become a Military Member:
Achieve, Inc.’s ASVAB (Armed Services Vocational Aptitude Battery) article:

To see fellow warrior, Nancy Bailey’s article on ASVAB and data mining:

To see fellow warrior, Shane Vander Hart’s article on ASVAB and CCSS:

The U.S. Dept. of Defense:

From the U.S. Dept. of Defense’s press release back in 2012 about how CCSS was a great way to fix schools for military children, this excerpt, “DOD provided about $3.7 billion over five years to fix these schools.” Remember, that’s your hard earned tax dollars at work. See the entire press release:
Keep in mind the Defense’s job is national security. Our public trust is that the men and women providing that security are a) honoring the oath they are sworn to take, b) upholding the American values our Founding Fathers based the U.S. Constitution, and c) that the protection provided is not driven by substandard education! To better visualize just how damning CCSS in our military is, visit the DofD’s website link below. Just look at all the areas of access the DofD has over our nation. Do you really want a CCSS aligned military? Especially given what objective, fact-based evidence, we the people had uncovered??


Finally, considering the vast reach the DofD has, you’ll want to read the U.S. White House’s document on data sharing:governmentdatashare

FOM: “Collective” Education

It's Friday, you know what that means! Time to measure what's truth, what's fallacy/fib or what's in between.
It’s Friday, you know what that means! Time to measure what’s truth, what’s fallacy/fib or what’s in between.

Literally, a couple of days ago, I shared with you about an organization called FSG and was able to tie it, not only to Common Core, but to the Gates Foundation. Before we fire up the “Fib-o-Meter” for its weekly measurement of “Total Truth”, “Neutral”, or “Total Fallacy”, I wanted to introduce to you a group that’s a result of the combined efforts of FSG and the Aspen Institute (a huge proponent for CCSS). It’s called the “Collective Impact Forum”. In the screen shot below, note the tone of voice the opening paragraph gives.

Nothing says 'alignment' quite like the 'collective good'.
Nothing says ‘alignment’ quite like the ‘collective good’.

First Up, the Funding:

If you log on to the CIF’s website, you’ll see alot about togetherness, community, and collective good. Then, on the right hand side of the screen, you’ll see a set of 3 boxes. One is about the funding. So, I clicked there. Seems CIF isn’t as ‘community oriented’ as they want us to believe. Why? You have to be a registered ‘funder’ to see whom else funds the Forum! For not being very neighbor-like in a community for collectiveness, “Total Fallacy” for denying access to those who respect transparency in our organizations. Oh, those other 2 tabs, one is labeled ‘Backbone Community’ (but you have to be a registered ‘backbone’ to view the rest of the others with backs). “Total Fallacy” for again, denying transparency to the general public.

The last one is labeled simply “Community”. That one I could access without being registered. Alas, this too is packed with general access. If you scroll down and see the pdf file they have to highlight their efforts in OUR communities, you have to be a registered member to have the document. I don’t think I like these neighbors very much, so far.
*NOTE: After digging around and being denied entry into several portions of this online community, I was able to find out the funding foundations. Fib-o-Meter’s rating this group as one big blob. For their collective efforts in funding our collective demise: “Total Fallacy”!


Next up, a “Total Truth”, Sort Of:

If you’re thinking there’s not much the Fib-o_Meter can measure today, just remember, we’ve not gotten very far. However, I did find this that from the perspective of the CIF, they feel is a “Total Truth”.

Those of us fighting CC, should consider it a chilling reminder why we fight so hard for our individual students. Visit, http://collectiveimpactforum.org/what-collective-impact, and as you scroll down, you’ll understand how the Fib-o-Meter measured this “Total Truth”.

I can share with you by snooping around the website a bit more the CIF considers the 2011 Standford Social Innovation Review’s article about collectiveness to be a foundation for what CIF does. The description CIF gives of the article shares it’s about large scale change with a common agenda for all. Here’s an excerpt you need to see concerning education.The scale and complexity of the U.S. public education system has thwarted attempted reforms for decades. Major funders, such as the Annenberg Foundation, Ford Foundation, and Pew Charitable Trusts have abandoned many of their efforts in frustration after acknowledging their lack of progress. Once the global leader—after World War II the United States had the highest high school graduation rate in the world—the country now ranks 18th among the top 24 industrialized nations, with more than 1 million secondary school students dropping out every year. The heroic efforts of countless teachers, administrators, and nonprofits, together with billions of dollars in charitable contributions, may have led to important improvements in individual schools and classrooms, yet system-wide progress has seemed virtually unobtainable.” Did you notice the “Total Truth” about those major funders? All 3 have been identified as pro-CCSS supporters. To see the rest of that 2011 article (where the Strive Together program is touted as successful; I’ve also written about Strive’s ties to CCSS), visit: http://www.ssireview.org/articles/entry/collective_impact

The “New” Neighbors?!:

In finding a page where you could actually find something other than ‘you must be a registered ____________.’, Look at the ‘neighbors’ committed to helping us all become more collective. (click to enlarge the picture)


For each of the above groups you can conduct your own look into them as far as their ties to CCSS or this collectiveness. Just by the sheer fact they are named in a joint project by two OTHER pro CCSS groups, might be proof enough for you. As an example of what you can find, look at what  Fib-o-Meter did find out about United Way Worldwide (one of the organizations above). UWW  is committed to global education and has corporate ties with other supportive CCSS groups such as Ford Motor Company, Exxon, WalMart, AT and T, and more. (see: http://worldwide.unitedway.org/pages/corporate-partners )

For this, Fib-o-Meter, rates UWW’s activity in this as “Total Truth”. For more “Total Truth” about the US United Way’s design on aligned education, see their “Birth to 21 Continuum”. You can access the timeline AS well as see what else they are doing in US education, http://www.unitedway.org/our-work/education/


Finally, Another Partner in the CIF You Should Know About:

Before the Fib-o-Meter shuts down for another week, let’s see how it rates this last group we’ll look at today. Called “The Integration Initiative”. 

Why is this one so special? Let’s find out. Here’s the reason Fib-o-Meter finds it ‘special’, see below and click to enlarge it.

Find out more: https://www.livingcities.org/about
Find out more:

Those most powerful institutions behind this Initiative? Straight from the TII’s website:

The Financiers:

  • The Annie E. Casey Foundation
  • AXA Equitable
  • Bank of America
  • Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation
  • Citi Foundation
  • Deutsche Bank
  • Ford Foundation
  • The John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation
  • The JPB Foundation
  • JPMorgan Chase & Co.
  • The Kresge Foundation
  • The McKnight Foundation
  • MetLife, Inc.
  • Morgan Stanley
  • Prudential Financial, Inc.
  • Robert Wood Johnson Foundation
  • The Rockefeller Foundation
  • Surdna Foundation
  • W.K. Kellogg Foundation
  • Wells Fargo

Affiliate Members

  • The Cleveland Foundation
  • The Skillman Foundation

Did you notice any group listed above as ones you already know as CCSS friendly, supportive, or profiting from? Fib-o-Meter did! More “Total Truths” from the TII about ‘cradle to career’, ‘data mining useage’ and more can be found at:


Notice the amount of P3 (Public Private Partnerships) involvement in our education system. Certainly not a great thing at all! If you consider that P3s are how we were saddled with CCSS in the first place, you know what a “Total Fallacy” this concept is!!


Each week, since I’ve begun my blog, we’ve looked at the fibs the CCSS Machine would like us to believe and exposed them. We’ve searched out and found the truth the Machine has wished to remain buried and brought them to the surface. I hope you’ve been able to see from this article and the one just 2 days ago that the collective mindset is ruining our education. It’s eroding our society. It’s simply a bad fit for America.

WYBI: New America Ed Central, Pre K to High Pay

If you don't New America Ed Central, you need to!
If you don’t New America Ed Central, you need to!

New America Ed Central:

Website: http://www.edcentral.org/ 

Who’s behind the organization:  “The New America Foundation is a nonprofit, nonpartisan public policy institute that invests in new thinkers and new ideas to address the next generation of challenges facing the United States.”

Who backs or contributes to the New America Foundation? “The program’s work is made possible through generous grants from the Alliance for Early Success; the Annie E. Casey Foundation; the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation; the Campaign for Grade-Level Reading; the Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund; the Grable Foundation; the Foundation for Child Development; the Joyce Foundation; the Kresge Foundation; the Lumina Foundation; the Pritzker Children’s Initiative; the Tides Foundation; the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation; and the W. Clement and Jessie V. Stone Foundation.”

Do you see how many of the  above listed funders are known Common Core Standards backers?!

For Early  Learners:

Besides heralding Sen. Alexander’s update to NCLB (No Child Left Behind), there are ways to target the earliest of learners in the classroom. How?? I’m so glad you asked.  By assessing the link provided, you can see all kinds of early learning items from alignment to CCSS to assessments. You can read why the commentators are quick to point out that researchers and policy makes are ‘slow’. See: http://www.edweek.org/ew/toc/2015/01/08/index.html?intc=EW-QC15-LFTNAV

For PreK-12th Grades: 

 On this page, you’ll see how the CCSS loving group is all about the E-rate legislation that will help to embed not only CCSS, but data mining too. In my article “A Cup of Coffee Can Now Data Mine”, I tell you HOW CCSS, the E-rate and our local libraries, schools are all set for alignment. See: http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1223

For Those in  Post Secondary Education: 

On the webpage for ‘Higher Education’, you’ll see a shameless plug for the recent ‘free community college’ push. See: http://www.edcentral.org/highered/ Now, in case you missed it, I wrote recently how Common Core Standards are already in community colleges across the nation. There have been other anti CCSS warriors spout off about the plan as well.

The Biggie: 

While all the above is enough to make the anti CCSS warrior scream, you’ll need to save it until you see this. A FEDERAL education budget project. Again, look above to the names of the groups backing the New American Foundation’s Project, “New Ed”!!

Second on the list of Advisors for the Federal Education Budget Project is Linda Darling-Hammond!! Excuse me, does anyone need a reminder of how pro CCSS she is?!
Here are the members of both groups in the advising capacity, straight from their website:

  • Richard Lee Colvin, Executive Director, Education Sector
  • Linda Darling-Hammond, Charles Ducommon Professor of Education, Stanford University
  • Robert Greenstein, Founder & CEO, Center on Budget and Policy Priorities
  • Eric Hanushek, Paul and Jean Hanna Senior Fellow, Hoover Institution/Stanford University
  • Bryan C. Hassel, Co-Director, Public Impact
  • Douglas Holtz-Eakin, former Director, Congressional Budget Office
  • Sharon Lynn Kagan, Virginia and Leonard Marx Professor of Early Childhood and Family Policy, Teachers College, Columbia University; Professor Adjunct, Child Study Center, Yale University
  • Dr. Ashby Kilgore, Superintendent, Newport News Public Schools
  • Charles Kolb, President, Committee for Economic Development, former Deputy Assistant for Domestic Policy to President George H. W. Bush
  • Gregory McGinity, Senior Director of Policy, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation
  • Becky A. Smerdon, Founder & Managing Director, Quill Research Associates, LLC

Congressional Working Group

The Budget Project also supports a Bipartisan Congressional Working Group on Education Funding that aims to generate fiscally responsible proposals that improve the size, distribution, and effectiveness of federal education funding. We operate as an expert “shadow staff” for Working Group Members providing them with new ideas, briefings, independent analyses, and technical assistance on education funding and budget issues. Current and past members include:

  • The Honorable Michael R. Castle (R-DE), United States House of Representatives ** Member, Education and Labor Committee
  • The Honorable Susan M. Collins (R-ME), United States Senate ** Member, Homeland Security and Government Affairs Committee
  • The Honorable Artur Davis (D-AL), United States House of Representatives ** Member, Ways and Means Committee
  • The Honorable Rosa DeLauro (D-CT), United States House of Representatives ** Member, Appropriations Committee ** Member, Budget Committee
  • The Honorable Christopher J. Dodd (D-CT), United States Senate ** Member, Health, Education, Labor and Pensions Committee
  • The Honorable Thomas R. Petri (R-WI), United States House of Representatives ** Member, Education and Labor Committee

I sure hope you see the irony that all these pro CCSS folks are backing federal education money, when ‘federal’ should have no business or portion of ‘education’!

For added research, be sure to look at the Federal Education Budget Project publications. You’ll see reports for those with special needs, amassing more data AND much more. See: http://febp.newamerica.net/publications

The Chirpy, Feel Good Promo:

Below, I’ve provided you with a short You Tube promo the New American Foundation has produced. Notice who’s in it, note what’s said. Then, filter that through the above lens of Common Core support. (Note: be sure to look the the entire channel of You Tube Videos from New America Foundation…they’re up to more than just education alignment)

Parting shot: 

Showing pro CCSS pride!
Showing pro CCSS pride!

As far as the ‘high pay’?? That comes IF you follow their aligned early ed to high ed program via a CCSS education, I guess. At least that’s the sales pitch.