Tag Archives: inclusion

FTF: New CCSS “Unpacking” Guide

This is from 21012. Just published (2015), is a new 'unpacking guide' from another company.
This is from 21012. Just published (2015), is a new ‘unpacking guide’ from another company.

It seems fitting for my “From the Files” post, that we look at CCSS and it’s unpacking. After all, if we’re going to continue to see students fail, teachers frustrated to the point of resigning, and other staff members saught after for MORE CCSS alignment, we need to know the latest. The graphic you see above is from 2012, supposedly as the CCSS was just being rolled out.  Just by the sheer fact the Standards needing an ‘unpacking’ guide should tell you that even then, the Standards were convoluted, but I digress. I will add that according to most veteran teachers I have talked to during this War Against the Core, educational standards are to be SO clear and concise, a teacher automatically knows how to approach them on their own. However, as we’ve seen with the CCSS Initiative’s agenda, nothing (or no one) connected to education can accomplish much ‘on their own’, it has to be all one way…sadly, that’s the ‘Common Core Way’.

A Bit of History:

From 2012, (where you’ll find the graphic above) and the State of NY, watch this short video and note how ‘talked down to’ the teachers are. Before you scream at me over that statement, consider that teachers have graduated colleges and universities, obtained many degrees, thus, they shouldn’t need to be told how to draw a circle, find the nouns or verbs, BUT that’s just what this presenter is doing!



Did you notice the makeover of “Bloom’s Taxonomy” to fit the CCSS?! While “Bloom’s” is considered a great model for education, it is OUTCOME based education. As such, it makes sense CCSS folks in NY would use this. We anti CCSS Warriors know and have proven CCSS is all about ‘student outcomes’, ‘leveraging’, and on and on.

Not to pick on NY, I wanted to see what the CCSS official website had for ‘unpacking’. So, I found this You Tube video from THE CCSS official site. It’s from 2013. In the 2012 video, you saw the main point as how to ‘unpack’ or utilize the CCSS. This one instructs you on how to read and utilize CCSS!

Did you notice that not even 1 minute into this short video, you heard CCR (college and career readiness)?! Did you spot that the example was a K-5 page?! Did you hear that math isn’t supposed to be taught in an exact order, but rather clustered together? If you’re a parent who has wondered WHY your students struggle with math, this is key information! “No sequential order”, that is a disaster happening before our very eyes every single day throughout our nation when it comes to math. For math to make any sense, there MUST be a sequence. Is it any wonder we have students AND teachers giving up, burning out, and quitting?!

Fast Forward to 2015:

Just published by the Learning Sciences International (part of the Robert Marzano group) has a NEW CCSS ‘Unpacking’ guide. It’s by Toby J. Karten (a staff member of LSI) and is all about ‘inclusion’ for students and teachers using CCSS. Now, if you don’t know who Robert Marzano is or what Learning Sciences International does, I urge you to read my previously published articles, which I will include at the conclusion of this article. In short, LSI and Marzano are using CCSS for globalist mindsets and bending social and emotional learning (another huge part of CCSS indoctrination).

All that said, you’re probably wondering about the guide, after all this article is about ‘unpacking CCSS‘.
You can find the book on LSI’s website for sale in their ‘bookstore’ tab. Website: http://www.learningsciences.com/ When you visit the website (if you’ve not done so before) notice the names of the programs designed for students and educational staff. Just awful, in my researched opinion.
In order to promote Karten’s new book, LSI hosted a webinar (10/28/15). I’ve included in here for you. It’s just about 1 hour. Some of the key points are listed below for you. Please, don’t take my word for it, watch it, share the information with parents and others fighting this CCSS scourge.

Key points:
a) using CCSS for inclusive classrooms
b) affirming what you already know about CCSS
c) different strategies for using CCSS even better
d) at about 3:09, Karten points you to the crayon drawing beside her picture. It’s here she states the ultimate goal of CCSS is CCR (college and career readiness) {*personal note: please listen to how she describes the picture}
e) what will ‘trip the CCSS up?’ No support!!
f) special needs students, anyone who is ‘outside’ the ‘normal’ is used as an example in this presentation. You’ll see IDEA talked about, IEPs for IDEA students, etc. *7:08 in the video)
In case you’re not watching the video, here’s her slide for IEPs and CCSS:
iepskarten
g) CCSS is successful for ALL learners, differences or likenesses, aside.
h) collaboration is a non negotiable part of CCSS. This extends to not only teachers and other educational staff but the students families as well!
i) 19:10 different strategies for more CCSS modeling and monitoring of the students (which is to be an on-going process) are revealed (they are repeated at 26:30 as well in not only their ‘alphabet soup’ forms, but what each stands for)

Related resources:
Marzano, LSI:

https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/02/monday-musings-purposed-embedding-for-the-core/ (This one highlights the global aspect of the Marzano Institute before it became the LSI)
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/08/03/monday-musings-rigor-walk/
(This article describes for you the ‘rigor’ LSI is after in our schools and how it grades both staff and students)
Project Based Learning:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/25/sic-em-saturday-ccss-progressives-and-pbls/
Special Needs, IEPs, IDEA:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/10/19/monday-musings-idea-when-good-goes-ccscte-bad/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/07/02/tech-thursday-cte-ccss-and-special-needs-in-post-secondary-education/


Closing:

Anti CCSS Warriors, please, read, review, and share all this information. From the pro side of CCSS, you heard it: with out support, CCSS will not succeed! That’s our intent..to NOT support it. However, many others must know this, too!

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Tech Thursday: CTE, CCSS, and Special Needs in Post Secondary Education

Back in December 2014, I first wrote about Common Core, Career and Technical Education and its impact on the Special Needs students. What’s the latest for this population group in Post-Secondary education? Let’s find out in today’s article. Below is the link to the 2014 article:

https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/tech-thursday-career-techcommon-core-and-alternative-education/

Also related to this is the CCSS alignment of IEPs: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/rmt-ccsss-present-to-special-needs/

Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.
Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.

An Education Webinar from June 30th:

Just a couple of days ago, the Gates Foundation backed “Education Week” hosted a free educational webinar about post secondary life for those with special needs. The following information is from links suggested as credible resources during the webinar. Credible for us, the anti CCSS Warriors, means we can use the resources to know where to look to access the CCSS Machine’s grasp for our students with special needs.

Education Week’s article, “Advocates Hope Common Core Will Rub Off” shares this criticism that not enough transitional planning is going on for those with special needs shifting from high school to post secondary education. While that may or may not be true, it’s the source EW used which is skewed towards CCSS/CTE (AIR, American Institutes of Research) offering the criticism. “”Many plans lack depth, breadth, and personalization; have low expectations for students with disabilities; do not include plans for postsecondary education; and do not map out how the K–12 education system should connect to other systems, such as postsecondary, vocational rehabilitation, workforce training, or independent services,” says a 2013 report from the American Institutes for Research. “As a result, many students with disabilities leave high school with amorphous and generic plans that fail to address their individual circumstances or interests.” To access the entire article: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/04/advocates-hope-common-core-will-rub-off.html?intc=EW-DPCT15-TOC

From that 2013 AIR Report (be sure to click on the image to enlarge it):

AIRneeds

To access the 2013 AIR Report: Improving College and Career Readiness for Students with Disabilities

NASDSE, the National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Inc.:

This group based in VA, is supporting the ‘Every Child Achieves Act’ (aka: HR5 as the re-authorization of the NCLB law which in turn gave us Race to the Top and Common Core). Here’s an excerpt from their letter of support to Sen. Lamar Alexander, “NASDSE commends you for including in your bill language that only allows up to one percent of all students – those who have the most significant cognitive disabilities – to take an alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards. This cap is critical to ensuring that students with disabilities will remain on track to graduate from high school prepared for postsecondary education and/or a career. We therefore urge that you oppose any efforts during the bill’s markup that would raise or eliminate this cap.” You can read the entire letter, http://www.nasdse.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=hLXguhdRtoM%3d&tabid=36

Also available from the NASDSE, is a 2004 data collection document which spells out what ADDITIONAL data is collected on each student with special needs. You can read it: SpecNeedsDataCollect

NASDSE has been around since 1938, but its most recent set of goals includes more post secondary success for the students served. Here’s a short paragraph you may find interesting, “The continued collaboration with our key partners, including the National Association of State Title I Directors and the Council of Administrators of Special Education brings us closer to common language in serving and improving outcomes for all students and remains a priority for NASDSE, as is collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs, in order to provide input regarding implementation of the State Systemic Improvement Plans,  Results Driven Accountability and the role of the National Center for Systemic Improvement (NCSI) in providing direct support to our members.”

The Board of Directors are all from various states across America and their Public Instruction departments. AZ, VA, MT, NH, UT, CA, GA, and SD. See: http://www.nasdse.org/AboutNASDSE/BoardofDirectors/tabid/406/Default.aspx (*NOTE; from here you can explore more about the organization via the left hand menu)

If you’re curious about the funding each state receives for educating special needs students, NASDSE and AIR (as in the group above) partnered together back in 2010 and published a report about this topic. See: NASDSEAIR

To find out all the NASDSE’s corporate sponsors and other groups involved: http://www.nasdse.org/ResourceLinks/tabid/59/Default.aspx

Pacer’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment, http://www.pacer.org/transition/:

From their website, “Founded in 1977, PACER Center was created by parents of children and youth with disabilities to help other parents and families facing similar challenges. PACER Center enhances the quality of life and expands opportunities for children, youth, and young adults with all disabilities and their families so each person can reach his or her highest potential. PACER operates on the principles of parents helping parents, supporting families, promoting a safe environment for all children, and working in collaboration with others.” It is a non profit organization based in MN. It is funded by the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Office for Special Education Programs (*NOTE: you can find this fact at the bottom of every page on the website highlighted in blue)

From the Pacer’s 2014 published resources, a ‘new’ way to look at career paths for those students ready to go from high school to post secondary education. Here’s an interesting couple of paragraphs to read. When reading, consider the context of Career Pathways and/or Career and Technical Education (which are CCSS aligned), “To be able to acquire these skills and effectively change jobs, and plan and manage multiple careers over one’s life time, career development skills are important. The process by which youth get to know their strengths and interests, learn how different jobs connect with those interests, and build these career planning and management skills is called career development.” 

“By helping to support youth in making important informed decisions about their future, parents and other caring adults can contribute a great deal to their children’s post-high school success. For youth with disabilities in particular, families often play the very important roles of setting high expectations for youth’s future employment, and of advocating for opportunities for them to identify their strengths and interests and to explore career options. Families who learn about and begin the career development process with their youth early will be better prepared to support them in choosing and building a bright future. “Family” here is defined broadly as adults and children related biologically, emotionally, or legally, including single parents, blended families, unrelated individuals living cooperatively, and partnered couples who live with biological, adopted, and foster children.” The entire document was found on a linked website from the Pacer’s website. The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability (NCWD). To read the NCWD’s entire document, http://www.ncwd-youth.info/node/1463 (*NOTE: The NCWD is part of the Institute for Educational Leadership which is a supported by a grant from the U.S. Dept. of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, ODEP; you can find this information at the bottom of the page when you access the article mentioned directly above. It’s highlighted in blue.)
“Think College!”, http://www.thinkcollege.net/:

From their website, you can find out that  “Think College is a project of the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The Think College initiatives are funded by grants from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, the Office of Special Education Programs, and the Office of Postsecondary Education.”

For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports
For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports

If you’d like to see the CCSS tie between the Standards and Boston College, http://frontrow.bc.edu/program/braun/

For more proof of BC’s CCSS stance:

BostonCollegeccss

Closing:

If you need more evidence of how intrusive the CCSS Machine is being in regard to our families and students with special needs, please let me know. If you have such evidence or wish to provide a real life account of your family’s saga with Career and Tech Education or Common Core, please let me know.