Tag Archives: Education Week

State Digital Education

knewtondigital

Anti CCSS Warriors, if you have seen my last two articles, then you know the ESSA (Every Student Succeeds Act) has mandates for digital education embedded, a massive and invasive data collection study in the works and more.
But what about the digital education push from your state’s level?In case you haven’t read the articles, please note both are very detailed, so be sure you take your time reading them. Today’s is also jam packed, but it it imperative we read and share!

Thursday’s Article: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2016/02/04/essa-and-digital-overload/
This Past Weekend’s Article: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2016/02/05/weekend-news-the-ies-and-the-essa/

 

The U.S. Dept. of Ed’s Latest Propaganda:

In preparing for this article, I stumbled upon the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s latest Twitter video. It fits right into today’s question concerning the state levels for digital education. What a slick sales pitch for College/Career Readiness AND digital learning!
See:

https://amp.twimg.com/v/dcb95af5-160a-47b5-a48a-5a293dfe2e18

Now that you have watched the video, look at this screen shot (also from the Knewton Presentation seen above).
facilitatedigitalIf you would like to see the entire Knewton Presentation, see:
https://www.knewton.com/infographics/the-state-of-digital-education-infographic/
(*Note: Knewton is hardly anti-CCSS or for that matter, anti-ANYTHING that goes with them.)

See:
1) http://curmudgucation.blogspot.com/2014/03/who-puts-scary-in-pearson-meet-knewton.html

2) Access this YouTube video from my fellow anti CCSS Warrior, Nicole Revels:

So, What’s in Your State?

The video above was specific to an NC meeting. However, look at the information presented, it doesn’t stop at the NC state lines! The data mining, digital education tie is in ALL 50 States! So where do you look to find the amounts of money, people, and legislation allowing all this to happen? How will the newly passed ESSA law (with all its digital education mandates) change all this already in place?

1) State Policy Network (SPN) claims their digital education toolkit is the best available. However, I tend to see their toolkit as a subjective view NOT an objective one. Why? First, look at the toolkit’s main page and you will see an embedded video from KIPP ( a very big CCSS Machine member) See my previously published article: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/18/tech-thursday-the-latest-faux-pas-in-education-workforce/
Then, check out the Gates Foundation Grant Database, where KIPP has been generously awarded money for alignment to all things CCSS: http://www.gatesfoundation.org/How-We-Work/Quick-Links/Grants-Database#q/k=KIPP
The KIPP connection is but one clue the SPN Toolkit is subjective. There is more:
See: http://nonprofitquarterly.org/2013/11/14/corporate-money-in-network-of-right-wing-state-policy-think-tanks/

There are 5 goals the SPN states as to WHY digital education is so vital today. You can see the excerpt, “Evaluate students (based on what they know, not how long they are in a place);
Certify and evaluate teachers (based on how well they teach what they know, not the credentials obtained); Evaluate courses and materials (based on state standards); Provide access (instead of getting in the way); and Pay for all of it (with proper accountability).”
To see the entire Toolkit: http://www.spn.org/digital_education/

2) SETDA and the Friday Institute have a June 2015 report detailing the 50 States and Digital Education. Before we look at it, however, consider that BOTH are also Pro-CCSS/CCR/CTE (Common Core State Standards, College and Career Readiness, Career Tech Education) See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/05/15/fom-sbac-and-parcc-revisited/
Then: http://ladyliberty1885.com/2015/08/30/possibly-the-most-arrogant-and-insulting-common-core-article-ive-seen-in-a-while/

According the the 2015 Report, there are 5 States heralded as leaders in digital education:
Alabama, North Carolina, Utah, Indiana, and Kentucky. There are also 5 main components of digital education every State will have, thanks to ESSA.
5digital
As I have shared with you in past 2 articles detailing the digital mandates in ESSA, the Infrastructure will be one of the biggest clues as to where to look in your State. What are the plans for better internet in your area? Are your service providers upgrading their systems? Has your state recently passed legislation for Rural Education funding? There are other similar questions for you to ask.

To access the June 2015 Report (where just below this screen shot you will see the descriptions of how each of the 5 goals will be obtained): DigitalLearningExemplars_June2015

As an example of legislation passed, here in NC, to support digital learning, read this excerpt from the Report, “State Law 2013-12 requires the North Carolina
Department of Public Instruction (NCDPI) to assist districts in the transition from textbooks to digital materials by 2017. These materials must be effective for all learners and align with the curriculum and standards. Such a law promotes progress toward some level of digital learning statewide.” What if you don’t live in one of the 5 States mentioned as leaders? The Report will also detail all the other States and where they are in the path of mass alignment.

Since AL is considered to be the #1 leader in the shift to digital education, see this article about the Governor pushing for more fiber optic connections throughout the State:
http://www.centerdigitaled.com/k-12/Alabama-Governor-Pushes-Fiber-Optic-Cables-for-Schools.html

If you would like to see how SETDA is modernizing the E-rate in your State, see:
http://www.setda.org/priorities/equity-of-access/e-rate-modernization/

So Where in ESSA are the Libraries?

Based on the ESSA Final Conference Report (I shared the document with you in the Thursday article mentioned above), here are page numbers concerning digital education and libraries:
1) Page 138, school libraries and their programs to be updated to digital
2) Page 323, school libraries and their programs must offer digital courses to all school leaders
3) Page 343, school libraries and their programs to lead all school employees in digitally led courses as part of ‘safe schools’
4) Page 384, possible U.S. Dept. of Ed Secretary awarded grants for school libraries and digital led programming
5) 387, all libraries (school or public) are included, with museums, non-profits, and post-secondary educational instututions
6) Page 515, after school programs via extended public library services/hours
7) Page 1,000, authorizes the LSTA (Library Services and Technology Act) grant money to be used for technology upgrades and/or purchases for digital education for all
8) Page 1,037, embeds the Museum and Library Services Act, MLSA

 

 Related Information:

Kipp has partnered with several post-secondary institutions in America to continue the CCSS Machine’s alignment. See:
http://www.kipp.org/our-approach/kipp-through-college/college-partnerships

The Gates Foundation-friendly Education Week has an article you will need to access as well. It deals with the E-rate legislation (a federal level law which impacts all 50 States) and its role in digital education. See: http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/DigitalEducation/2015/10/e-rate_application_toolkit.html
In contrast, I wrote an anti CCSS Warrior article about the E-rate legislation back in 2014 for Prevent Common Core’s website. See: http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1223

The Federal Learning Registry is slam full of massive data mining via digital education.
See: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/12/monday-musings-assessments-data-mining/

SETDA’s role in ridding the world of printed textbooks:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/01/sic-em-saturday-creatively-turning-the-usa-common/

For LSTA (Library Services and Technology Act) see my previously published article:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/monday-musings-hitting-the-books/

For how much MLSA (Museum and Library Services Act) grant money your State has been awarded, see:
https://www.imls.gov/grants/grants-states


 

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Tech Thursday: CTE, CCSS, and Special Needs in Post Secondary Education

Back in December 2014, I first wrote about Common Core, Career and Technical Education and its impact on the Special Needs students. What’s the latest for this population group in Post-Secondary education? Let’s find out in today’s article. Below is the link to the 2014 article:

https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/12/03/tech-thursday-career-techcommon-core-and-alternative-education/

Also related to this is the CCSS alignment of IEPs: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/10/rmt-ccsss-present-to-special-needs/

Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.
Want to know how aligned post secondary education can be? Imagine your student on any one of the 3 tracks you see.

An Education Webinar from June 30th:

Just a couple of days ago, the Gates Foundation backed “Education Week” hosted a free educational webinar about post secondary life for those with special needs. The following information is from links suggested as credible resources during the webinar. Credible for us, the anti CCSS Warriors, means we can use the resources to know where to look to access the CCSS Machine’s grasp for our students with special needs.

Education Week’s article, “Advocates Hope Common Core Will Rub Off” shares this criticism that not enough transitional planning is going on for those with special needs shifting from high school to post secondary education. While that may or may not be true, it’s the source EW used which is skewed towards CCSS/CTE (AIR, American Institutes of Research) offering the criticism. “”Many plans lack depth, breadth, and personalization; have low expectations for students with disabilities; do not include plans for postsecondary education; and do not map out how the K–12 education system should connect to other systems, such as postsecondary, vocational rehabilitation, workforce training, or independent services,” says a 2013 report from the American Institutes for Research. “As a result, many students with disabilities leave high school with amorphous and generic plans that fail to address their individual circumstances or interests.” To access the entire article: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/06/04/advocates-hope-common-core-will-rub-off.html?intc=EW-DPCT15-TOC

From that 2013 AIR Report (be sure to click on the image to enlarge it):

AIRneeds

To access the 2013 AIR Report: Improving College and Career Readiness for Students with Disabilities

NASDSE, the National Association of State Directors of Special Education, Inc.:

This group based in VA, is supporting the ‘Every Child Achieves Act’ (aka: HR5 as the re-authorization of the NCLB law which in turn gave us Race to the Top and Common Core). Here’s an excerpt from their letter of support to Sen. Lamar Alexander, “NASDSE commends you for including in your bill language that only allows up to one percent of all students – those who have the most significant cognitive disabilities – to take an alternate assessment based on alternate achievement standards. This cap is critical to ensuring that students with disabilities will remain on track to graduate from high school prepared for postsecondary education and/or a career. We therefore urge that you oppose any efforts during the bill’s markup that would raise or eliminate this cap.” You can read the entire letter, http://www.nasdse.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=hLXguhdRtoM%3d&tabid=36

Also available from the NASDSE, is a 2004 data collection document which spells out what ADDITIONAL data is collected on each student with special needs. You can read it: SpecNeedsDataCollect

NASDSE has been around since 1938, but its most recent set of goals includes more post secondary success for the students served. Here’s a short paragraph you may find interesting, “The continued collaboration with our key partners, including the National Association of State Title I Directors and the Council of Administrators of Special Education brings us closer to common language in serving and improving outcomes for all students and remains a priority for NASDSE, as is collaboration with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office of Special Education Programs, in order to provide input regarding implementation of the State Systemic Improvement Plans,  Results Driven Accountability and the role of the National Center for Systemic Improvement (NCSI) in providing direct support to our members.”

The Board of Directors are all from various states across America and their Public Instruction departments. AZ, VA, MT, NH, UT, CA, GA, and SD. See: http://www.nasdse.org/AboutNASDSE/BoardofDirectors/tabid/406/Default.aspx (*NOTE; from here you can explore more about the organization via the left hand menu)

If you’re curious about the funding each state receives for educating special needs students, NASDSE and AIR (as in the group above) partnered together back in 2010 and published a report about this topic. See: NASDSEAIR

To find out all the NASDSE’s corporate sponsors and other groups involved: http://www.nasdse.org/ResourceLinks/tabid/59/Default.aspx

Pacer’s National Parent Center on Transition and Employment, http://www.pacer.org/transition/:

From their website, “Founded in 1977, PACER Center was created by parents of children and youth with disabilities to help other parents and families facing similar challenges. PACER Center enhances the quality of life and expands opportunities for children, youth, and young adults with all disabilities and their families so each person can reach his or her highest potential. PACER operates on the principles of parents helping parents, supporting families, promoting a safe environment for all children, and working in collaboration with others.” It is a non profit organization based in MN. It is funded by the U.S. Dept. of Education’s Office for Special Education Programs (*NOTE: you can find this fact at the bottom of every page on the website highlighted in blue)

From the Pacer’s 2014 published resources, a ‘new’ way to look at career paths for those students ready to go from high school to post secondary education. Here’s an interesting couple of paragraphs to read. When reading, consider the context of Career Pathways and/or Career and Technical Education (which are CCSS aligned), “To be able to acquire these skills and effectively change jobs, and plan and manage multiple careers over one’s life time, career development skills are important. The process by which youth get to know their strengths and interests, learn how different jobs connect with those interests, and build these career planning and management skills is called career development.” 

“By helping to support youth in making important informed decisions about their future, parents and other caring adults can contribute a great deal to their children’s post-high school success. For youth with disabilities in particular, families often play the very important roles of setting high expectations for youth’s future employment, and of advocating for opportunities for them to identify their strengths and interests and to explore career options. Families who learn about and begin the career development process with their youth early will be better prepared to support them in choosing and building a bright future. “Family” here is defined broadly as adults and children related biologically, emotionally, or legally, including single parents, blended families, unrelated individuals living cooperatively, and partnered couples who live with biological, adopted, and foster children.” The entire document was found on a linked website from the Pacer’s website. The National Collaborative on Workforce and Disability (NCWD). To read the NCWD’s entire document, http://www.ncwd-youth.info/node/1463 (*NOTE: The NCWD is part of the Institute for Educational Leadership which is a supported by a grant from the U.S. Dept. of Labor’s Office of Disability Employment Policy, ODEP; you can find this information at the bottom of the page when you access the article mentioned directly above. It’s highlighted in blue.)
“Think College!”, http://www.thinkcollege.net/:

From their website, you can find out that  “Think College is a project of the Institute for Community Inclusion at the University of Massachusetts Boston. The Think College initiatives are funded by grants from the National Institute on Disability and Rehabilitation Research, the Administration on Developmental Disabilities, the Office of Special Education Programs, and the Office of Postsecondary Education.”

For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports
For this information and more like it, http://www.thinkcollege.net/publications/annual-reports

If you’d like to see the CCSS tie between the Standards and Boston College, http://frontrow.bc.edu/program/braun/

For more proof of BC’s CCSS stance:

BostonCollegeccss

Closing:

If you need more evidence of how intrusive the CCSS Machine is being in regard to our families and students with special needs, please let me know. If you have such evidence or wish to provide a real life account of your family’s saga with Career and Tech Education or Common Core, please let me know.

Tech Thursday: CAPS via Career Pathways is Still CCSS!

Back on March 1, 2015 I shared with you a bit about how the educational deck of cards (so to speak) is continually being stacked in favor of Common Core or any of its other arms: Career Tech Ed, Career Pathways, College, Career Readiness, etc. So, today’s article is a follow up to more of the same stacking via Education Week publication.

First, an excerpt:

Being such a research ‘nut’, I have all kinds of ‘pro CCSS’ stuff AND ‘anti CCSS’ stuff hit my inboxes or social media feeds. One such is “Ed Week”. I knew it was supportive of the Core, but I just didn’t know HOW much. Here’s my ‘confession’ as it appeared in the original article. If you don’t read this original one before you read today’s article, be sure to have it ready to access as a reference point of importance. (see: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/03/01/rmt-why-is-the-deck-still-being-stacked-to-serve-ccss/)

“When I first subscribed to this online newsletter, I had no idea it was funded by so many of the same big name foundations supportive of CCSS. Thus, making almost everything reported vented toward CCSS. When I did discover this fact, I was able to discern the lies from the truth much more easily.”

I can happily say that since the discovery of those pro CCSS groups using Education Week as a front, I know right away any webinar, conference, or other resource I’m invited to participate in or use, will ALL be to help further the CCSS Machine.

The Conference I Passed Up:

For as long as Education Week has held an annual “Leaders to Learn From” Conference, Washington, D. C. has played host city. The group of “Leaders” are reader nominated for their best practices, proven models of what works in today’s classrooms. Here’s how it was promoted in an email, “Leaders To Learn From 2015 is your one chance to join more than 150 of the most influential education leaders from across America to gather in one room and celebrate outstanding leaders in K-12 education: the practical innovators who have found frontline, effective solutions to the challenges facing today’s districts.” This conference happens each March. As you already know, I passed up attending. Why? My registration fee of almost $2,000.00 would help fund the CCSS Machine. In case you’re interested in discovering who the Keynote speakers were or any of the other details from March 2015’s event: http://leaders.edweek.org/event-details/

Among the 2015 Most Influential Education Week Leaders:

Here’s a short video to watch which was to celebrate those 2015 leaders. Listen for the educratic buzzwords we know mean CCSS/CCR/CTE.

For the rest of the article, I’m focusing on the leader of AND the program called CAPS.

Dr. Tom Triggs and his Center for Advanced Professional Studies. You’ll find Dr. Trigggs in Kansas. You’ll find many folks who reside in Kansas (as well as in other states) really like this program. I’ll admit, it is impressive, however, it’s still Career Pathways, Career Tech Ed and most definitely Common Core aligned!

To see the featured video of Mr. Trigg and CAPS: http://leaders.edweek.org/profile/tom-trigg-superintendent-career-pathways/?intc=ltlfcarous
To see the featured video of Mr. Trigg and CAPS:
http://leaders.edweek.org/profile/tom-trigg-superintendent-career-pathways/?intc=ltlfcarous

Here are Dr. Trigg’s 3 most important “Leadership Lessons”:

  • Real-World Relevance: Many comprehensive high schools understand the new three R’s—including the need for rigor and the importance of relationships. The third “R,” relevance, is the most difficult to implement. Involve business and industry partners to provide relevance.
  • Expertise, Not Money: Instead of approaching partners to ask for money, ask them to share their expertise and human capital. The business community is eagerly waiting for school districts to approach them.
  • High Expectations: Don’t underestimate your students. You can expect them to consistently exceed the expectations of the district’s business partners.

Education Weekly happily shared with readers that Dr Trigg has been named a Kansas Superintendent of the Year; that CAPS has been honored with not only awards, but other states replicating his program. WHAT Education Week didn’t share was Dr. Trigg serves on his local Chamber of Commerce Superintendents’ Forum and other community leadership roles. He’s a sought after member of the WSBC (Western States Benchmarking Consortium); the AASA (American Association of School Administators); under his ‘watch’ all those high stakes assessment scores have appeared impressive; Kansas state legislators take his words to heart. (see his entire bio: http://www.aasa.org/uploadedFiles/Programs_and_Events/Awards_and_Scholarships/SOY2011/Tom-Trigg-info-sheet.pdf )

As far as how AASA is CCSS friendly: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/02/13/fom-friday-ccss-cant-be-wrong/ (I featured AASA as one of the big supporters of all things CCSS)

As far as how WSBC is CCSS friendly (click to enlarge the screen shot):

Be sure to see the entire list of those behind WSBC.
Be sure to see the entire list of those behind WSBC.

Here’s Education Week’s featured video of Dr. Trigg and CAPS:

The CAPS:

The comprehensive high school offers students 6 strands (hey, wait isn’t CCSS plan ‘clusters’ or ‘pathways’?) From the FAQ page, here’s their description, “Blue Valley Schools’ Center for Advanced Professional Studies (CAPS) is a nationally recognized, innovative high school program. Students fast forward into their future and are fully immersed in a professional culture, solving real world problems, using industry standard tools and are mentored by actual employers, all while receiving high school and college credit. CAPS is an example of how business, community and public education can partner to produce personalized learning experiences that educate the workforce of tomorrow, especially in high skill, high demand jobs.”

I found this logo in the parent/student catalog for CAPS. Twenty-first Century Skills is a definite component.
I found this logo in the parent/student catalog for CAPS. Twenty-first Century Skills is a definite component.

As for those Common Core aligned Career Clusters? Yes, they are embedded in CAPS ‘strands’. See page 7 of the 2016 CAPS Vision document. caps_visioning_for_web_site Other things you’ll find in the Vision include how MIT (a known CTE/CCR/CCSS developer) helped ensure the school’s benchmarking component; how this particular CAPS is to become the flagship for a global network of such programs.

The Business partners of CAPS are many in number. If you’re interested in seeing just which local and national businesses have joined in on the alignment, http://www.bvcaps.org/s/1403/index.aspx?sid=1403&gid=1&pgid=322 *Note, you’ll have to access each business per CAPS strand. For example, if you want the Human Service Strand’s group of supporting businesses, you’d click on the live link marked “Human Services Strand”. In doing so myself, I was able to spy at least 3 national CCSS businesses which have chosen to align with CCSS. One example, Lego Education.

Lastly, If You Aren’t Familiar with Career Tech Education or Career Pathways:

Here are the links to my other articles on each:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/page/2/?s=career+pathways+career+clusters (contains 2 pages of research)

From Prevent Common Core’s website, my published research:
http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1187

About the Career Pathways National Network:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/01/08/tech-thursday-national-career-pathways-network/

RMT: Why Is the Deck Still Being Stacked to Serve CCSS?

Why are those in charge of so much in education STILL stacking the deck to serve CCSS?
Why are those in charge of so much in education STILL stacking the deck to serve CCSS?

Just a day or so ago, EAG News shared Truth in American Education’s story that a whopping 17% of parents actually like CCSS. So, that leaves a tremendous amount of us who DON’T like it! So, IF this is a true representation of America, WHY are so many in charge of educational products STILL stacking the deck FOR CCSS? This is our “Riddle Me This” post for today.

First up, The 17% story:

In case you missed it, here’s the link to the story. See: http://eagnews.org/just-17-of-americans-support-common-core/ Written by Shane Vander Hart, this article states that while 17 % don’t mind CCSS at all, 40 % don’t like CCSS and 42 % of parents are undecided. Now, there’s a lot more information given in Mr. Hart’s article and I’ll leave you to digesting it on your own.

However, it is my strong belief we may have the answer to our riddle almost immediately! How’s that, you ask? Well, IF I were in the market to sell you on the merits of CCSS, wouldn’t I stop at nothing to entice you? I would do all I could to sell you, after all, there’s lots of money in it for me if I do.

Think about it from a more simple approach. One of my favorite card games. It involves a lot of ‘selling’ my opponents as to why my line of thinking is better than anyone else’s in order to win something.

Those who are stacking the educational deck are doing almost the same thing. They are trotting out any line of logic possible..whether it’s fact based or trumped up. Any pro CCSS group known to be conducting some study at any point in time (at least recently) is now THE absolute ‘gospel truth’ in education. Let me give you a recent example.

“Education Week”:

When I first subscribed to this online newsletter, I had no idea it was funded by so many of the same big name foundations supportive of CCSS. Thus, making almost everything reported vented toward CCSS. When I did discover this fact, I was able to discern the lies from the truth much more easily. However, not everyone is into the amount of research I am.

So, IF I were one of those 42% on the fence about CCSS, I’d take a look at the website. I’d notice all the awards given, all the community benevolence going on, etc. I’d not think to look at WHO is funding the on-line news. Well, now you can! Here’s the link: http://www.edweek.org/info/about/philanthropy.html?intc=thed What a difference it makes knowing that the SAME foundations helping to bring us the Core are now bringing us so much news about it!

EW’s recent story shared that U. S. students, once again, are coming up short when compared to their global peers. (see: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/02/18/us-millennials-come-up-short-in-global.html?cmp=ENL-CM-NEWS2). How’s this a ‘stacked deck toward CCSS’? Simple, the entire article bases ‘facts’ on a study conducted by ETS (Educational Testing Service). Here’s how EW described ETS, “a new study by the Education Testing Service Center for Research on Human Capital and Education in Lawrenceville, N.J.” 

(see Education Week’s article in its entirety: http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2015/02/18/us-millennials-come-up-short-in-global.html?cmp=ENL-CM-NEWS2)

ETS (Educational Testing Service)

In 2014, I wrote about the obsession CCSS has with assessing and I focused on ETS. You will really enjoy the research presented in the article as it ties ETS to the SBAC/PARCC and so much more. (see: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/tag/ets/)

(*NOTE: In my original article, you’ll see how dependent many pro CCSS groups are acknowledging the ‘importance’ of NAEP (National Assessment of Educational Progress); you’ll see what other testing/assessments are considered the ‘top’ ones in the realm of all things CCSS related. NAEP has been used repeatedly to distort the need for national standards.) 

ETS’s newest report, just out a few days ago, indeed paints a bleak picture for our American students. You can access ETS’s website: http://www.ets.org. As far as their research topics, see the below screen shot.

Be sure to note the topics on the right hand side of the picture not in purple. See the award for OCED's PISA??
Be sure to note the topics on the right hand side of the picture not in purple. See the award for OCED’s PISA??

The ETS Study EW mentions can be found in its entirety: http://www.ets.org/s/research/30079/asc-millennials-and-the-future.pdf

PIAAC (Programme of the International Assessment of Adult Competencies):

Ed Week’s article from above also gives PIAAC some visibility in the article. PIAAC is a part of OCED (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) (*NOTE: The spelling is correct for international English, not American English) 

 Here’s how PIAAC’s stacking the ‘skills’ deck:

 Related links you may find helpful:

NAEP: http://nces.ed.gov/nationsreportcard/ (since this is from the U.S. Dept. of Ed, you’ll know it’s stacked evidence)

PIAAC/OECD: http://www.oecd.org/site/piaac/ (To see how PIAAC is using each country in an educational competition with the others: http://www.oecd.org/site/piaac/country-specific-material.htm)

Private school assessments by ETS: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/11/15/sic-em-saturday-when-your-faith-based-school-uses-ccss-assessments/

OECD and PISA (Programme for International Assessment): http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1263 This is the latest article I wrote for Prevent Common Core and address the stacked deck for CCSS from the educational leadership viewpoint. You may not believe some of the deck dealers involved.

To access the rest of ETS’s research topics: http://www.ets.org/research Here you can get an up close look at how our students are termed ‘human capital’, assessed internationally, and which policies in Washington are being impacted.

 Closing:

So, our answer to our riddle has taken us all over the globe and we still can easily see WHY so many are stacking the deck in education to CCSS…to make it’s global rhetoric a reality. So, while the pro CCSS dealers are dealing a stacked deck to the 42% currently reported as undecided how they feel about CCSS, that means we, the opposed have just as much opportunity to win those 42% of parents support with the TRUTH about CCSS. What a great way to start off a new week in the battle for our students!