Tag Archives: data mine

“Here I Stand, I Can Do No Other”

No, Warriors, I haven’t confused two historic figures. Yes, the picture you see is Joan of Arc. The title you read is a hat tip to Martin Luther as he nailed his 95 Points on that church door so long ago. If you have been following me long on my blog, or on social media, you know I have long identified with Joan’s fierceness. As far as Martin’s boldness? Yes, I’m about to go there.

A Certain Recent Release:

The President has recently released his 2018 Federal Budget Blueprint. It’s creating quite a buzz. You also know that in past federal budget releases, I’ve also gone over them.
In-depth and not unwilling to expose the alignment to the CCSS Machine.


The reality that the current President has promised to rid us of Common Core and yet padded the Administration with pro CCSS members, certainly has given us pause.

Trump’s promise for more jobs should also give us pause. Why? With the distinct presence of WIOA (Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act), ESSA (Every Student Succeeds), HEA (Higher Education Act); the federal money in place right NOW funneling through each of these; the CCSS Machine up to its neck in all 3, we need to be pointing to the same priorities:

a) Workforce based education IS here, playing out daily. It plays out not only through Common Core, but Career Tech Education, STEM, Next Gen, and so many other areas.
b) It’s playing out in employment centers, community colleges, our public-private partnerships, job development programs, and so many other places.
c) It comes in the form of SEL (social, emotional learning), CBE (competency based education), PBLs (project based learning), and constant over assessments for skills to meet some business’s idea of what a human should be able to do.

For the President to rid us of ‘Common Core’, he needs to be ready to rid us of ALL the connections. Think how many times we’ve heard and said, ‘follow the money’.

Since D.C. is a favored conduit of the CCSS Machine, we know a lot of evidence is waiting to be exposed. Federal budgets have lots of money…and lots of evidence we can trace.

Every day we hesitate, the more ingrained the CCSS Machine becomes in the new Administration. Warriors, we saw the CCSS Machine take up residence in D.C. during the previous Administration. The Machine is STILL there.

Warriors, do not simply look at the Blueprint’s ‘Dept. of Education’ budget items. Read the WHOLE thing.

I wish I could tell you that the CCSS presence has been eliminated with Mr. Trump’s Blueprint. It hasn’t.

Flummox Awaits Us:

(*Note: ‘flummox’ is an old word for being bewildered or perplexed.)

Flummox #1): So, in Trump’s Blueprint, did ‘Common Core’ get the axe? Not by name. There were some things involving CCSS, but not too many. Warriors, eliminating CCSS in one area (no matter how huge), means it survives elsewhere.

Flummox #2): Did the Dept. of Ed receive cuts? Yes, but are those cuts enough? That, my Warriors, remains to be seen.

Flummox #3): While the President’s Blueprint is not the entire Federal Budget,the word ‘blueprint’ suggests that what the President wants may be changed by Congress.

When will “We the People” get to see the entire 2018 federal budget? What other CCSS Machine ties will be revealed when We see it? Will We have time to influence Congress or will it be too late?

degrees

 A First Glance At The Blueprint:

Mr. Trump has identified (in the opening pages of the Blueprint) that the following federally funded activities/groups/services will be eliminated if his Budget requests are approved.

I’ve researched each of of these and have proven their CCSS ties. I’ve provided the previous published articles so you can go back and read just how deep those CCSS ties go. We’ll need to know which groups will be spinning the pro-CCSS rhetoric in the coming days.)

National Endowment of the Humanities  


National Endowment of the Arts 


PBS (proof)
*Note: be sure to scroll down to see PBS’s embedding in ESSA.


Institute of Library and Museum Services 
*Note: there are at least 2 other related articles mentioned in this one. Find them here and here.
We should also note the question posed in the ‘Services’ article. If local areas cannot match federal funds, services like your libraries will close.


Woodrow Wilson International Center of Scholars (my article delved into the Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Program. Both are under the same logo.) In the Blueprint, it is unclear how and if the International funding cut will impact the entire Woodrow Wilson organization.


21st Century Community Learning Centers
*Note: of the many articles surrounding 21stCCLCs, this is probably the most relevant considering the Blueprint.

Be sure to see the other connections you’ll also see in the Blueprint. Also remember, Warriors, 21st CCLCs are codified in ESSA. Will Trump’s elimination of CCSS, repeal ESSA?!

blueprintbuddies

Blueprint Agency Items “I Can Do No Other With”:

Martin Luther’s passion for truth and his boldness for making the evidence public drove him to state the declaration you see above. I like that boldness. While he found 95 pieces of evidence for action,  I’ve been able to identify 85 Concerns in the President’s Blueprint.  Here is the link to my special Guide detailing them.

To use the Guide, simply open the link. All red highlighted words will have several of my previously published articles which directly relate to each of the Agencies in the Blueprint.

Use the research to help you formulate your dissent to seeing MORE Common Core (and all its related entities) continued in the 2018 Budget!

Use any of the research to help you create a way to help remind the President of his campaign promise to rid us of Common Core. To rid us of the name only, solves nothing.

Lastly, share the Guide, as you see fit. Knowledge about the CCSS Machine is what keeps us powerful. We should be making as much of a protest about the Blueprint as we did about the new Secretary of Education’s confirmation.

No, we should be making MORE noise. We should demand a full repeal of any and all federal activity overreaching into education.

Warriors, it will take MORE than alerting the Oval Office with our priorities. We need to be ‘nailing these points to Congress’s doors. We need to be shouting these pieces of evidence boldly.

Warriors, we must do all of this. To do less, is something we should not permit. To take a ‘wait and see’ attitude could be dangerous to our fellow citizens.
Why? The federal budget impacts every age group, not a select few. With so much of the CCSS Machine still in our education, we must be a modern day Martin Luther of Joan of Arc.

 

Tech Thursday: Educause’s Higher Education Project

Have you heard of Educause before? Did you know it has deep roots into Common Core? Would it surprise you to know they are fast and furiously working on a project targeting higher education? Well, my friends..sit back and get a brief overview of all of the above.

Educause, proud to be CC aligned:

The Gates Foundation has consistently given grants to Educause since 2010 to create, market and sell CC related projects all geared for the digital world. Visit the Gates link to see just how MUCH Educause has received, http://www.gatesfoundation.org/How-We-Work/Quick-Links/Grants-Database#q/k=educause (I’ve given you a small screen shot so you have a visual idea.

Money to bring you digital CCSS.
Money to bring you digital CCSS.

ForThe Higher Ed Project: 

This project has quite a name, “Higher Education TechQual+ Project”, according to the main website for the project it’s headed by a Dr. at the University of Georgia. However, the Texas A and M at Qatar has quite a hand in this too. Let’s see what the site shares. First up, the ‘history’ (see: https://www.techqual.org/docs/about.aspx#) Wait up, did you catch WHERE the TAM campus is located??? Not in America, but Qatar!  It appears that the entire project is all about the data and storage. Well, we know those 2 components are huge in CC. Yes, by looking at the Project there is some assessing is involved. No smoking gun for CCSS, however. So, let’s see what the Educause website tells us.

Searching for TechQual on Educause:

Flipping the search over to Educause, maybe we can find out a bit more about the TechQual’s real purpose. So far, we know data, storage, and assessments, but is there more??

Back in 2010, a Project meeting did take place for an update of the process. From the description for the meeting, note this excerpt, Assessment and measurement are key competencies for those who manage information technology resources. The Higher Education TechQual+ Project was commissioned in 2007 to create a set of easy-to-use tools to assist with this challenging work. This meeting will provide a project overview and updates on the TechQual+ instrument and website tools for 2009.” What’s interesting, is if you look at the meeting description from just one year prior to 2010, that being 2009, you’d find the details state the Project was commissioned in 2005.  I guess the beginning date shouldn’t be the focus as much as what is being done with the data, but I do find it interesting that such conflicting details (small though it is) are present.

Looking at what else Educause Supports That Involves So Much Data:

Well, listen to this gentlemen’s description of data/storage/assessments:

 

Did you catch the Universal Standards? Did you hear the ‘consistency’ buzzword in relation to academics? Let’s dig some more! He mentioned Canvas Educational Software, so let’s see what that’s about, shall we?

Canvas, It Isn’t for Painting!:

To find Canvas’ website, visit: http://www.instructure.com/, once there, you’ll find more education buzzwords you’ve heard and a few new ones! For example ‘lossless learning’. The familiar student-centered education rhetoric abounds. “LL” is the use of streamlined academics combined with embedded assessments AND face to face time. Watch the snappy video. Listen for the ‘outcome’ buzzword, too! (you’ll need to school down the page to access it), http://www.instructure.com/higher-education/features?lossless

Some of that streamlined academic stuff? Just take a look at the screen shot below:

canvasapp

From Canvas’ News, “Blended Learning” at a Florida post secondary school! You might want to look at all their FREE courses via digital delivery. Some are blatant in the hidden agenda of all things College/Career Ready. See: https://www.canvas.net/ Before we leave Instructure, read what they think their spin on education is doing, “Canvas isn’t just a product. IT’S A BREATH OF FRESH AIR. IT’S AN EDUCATIONAL REVOLUTION. IT’S A POWERFUL NEW WAY TO–PARDON OUR OPTIMISM–CHANGE THE WORLD. IT’S A RAPIDLY GROWING COMPANY WITH AN INDUSTRY-PUSHING PLATFORM, 400+ TALENTED EMPLOYEES, AND MILLIONS OF PASSIONATE STUDENTS AND TEACHERS. AND, SURE, THERE’S ALSO A PRETTY INCREDIBLE PRODUCT IN THERE, TOO.”

Back to the Drawing Board, Educause:

The organization has a 3 prong IT focus, all of which, oddly enough, can be found in the CCMachine! There’s “Teaching and Learning”, “Policy and Security”, and “Infrastructure and Enterprise”. So, where is the anti CC warrior to hone in on, with an organization of Educause’s size? E-rate legislation from the federal government will most assuredly be in the mix. Why? Because CC is embedded in the new legislation. That’s why proCC groups are encouraging legislators to jump on board! How do I know? Research, baby, lots of it. (See my article on Prevent Common Core’s website “A Cup of Coffee Can Now Data Mine”
http://preventcommoncore.com/?p=1223) Next, a concerned area you can fight for is contained in the “Infrastructure”, via e-clouds, technology, and those sorts of things. In the ‘Teaching/Learning’ arena, it’s all about the content. See the screen shot below:

So much CCSS, you'll want to barf.
So much CCSS, you’ll want to barf.

What to watch for:

First, anything with “Next Generation” especially coupled with “learning challenges”. Why? Some of the main ones funding CCSS, fund this too. It involves Community Colleges, Community Pathway Programs, Harbormaster regions for K-12 education, and SO much more!! (see: http://www.educause.edu/focus-areas-and-initiatives/teaching-and-learning/next-generation-learning-challenges)

Which organizations are ‘buddies’:

Once you see this list, know that somehow, some way..agenda for an aligned education is at hand!

  • American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admissions Officers (AACRAO)
  • American Association of Community Colleges (AACC)
  • American Association of State Colleges and Universities (AASCU)
  • American Council on Education (ACE)
  • American Indian Higher Education Consortium (AIHEC)
  • American Library Association (ALA)
  • APPA – Association of Higher Education Facilities Officers
  • Association for Communications Technology Professionals in Higher Education (ACUTA)
  • Association of American Universities (AAU)
  • The Association of Research Libraries (ARL)
  • Association of Public and Land-Grant Universities
  • The Campus Computing Project
  • The Center for Internet Security
  • Coalition for Networked Information (CNI)
  • Common Solutions Group
  • Council of Higher Education Management Associations (CHEMA)
  • Council of Independent Colleges (CIC)
  • Council of the Australian University Directors of Information Technology (CAUDIT)
  • Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR)
  • Digital Freedom Campaign
  • European University Information Systems (EUNIS)
  • Forum for the Future of Higher Education
  • Higher Education Alliance for Information Technology (HEITAlliance)
  • Higher Education Comliance Alliance
  • Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU)
  • Internet2
  • League for Innovation in the Community College
  • National Association for Equal Opportunity in Higher Education (NAFEO)
  • National Association of College Admission Counseling (NACAC)
  • National Association of College and University Attorneys (NACUA)
  • National Association of College and University Business Officers (NACUBO)
  • The New Media Consortium
  • North East Regional Computing Program (NERCOMP)
  • The ResNet Symposium

Parting Knowledge:

Educause is a non-profit group. Colorado is one home office, while D.C. is another. So, keeping an eye on education policy isn’t far off the radar. They believe in the the 3 Cs of the one world, one education mindset we’ve seen surface in Common Core, “for the common good”, “collaboration”, and the 21st Century “community”. The Board of Directors can be found on: http://www.educause.edu/about/mission-and-organization/governance-and-leadership/educause-board-directors The special advisors on education: 

http://www.educause.edu/about/mission-and-organization/governance/working-groups (there are quite a few)

Roots of Educause can be traced to the Kellogg Foundation (a well known CC supporter). Don’t be surprised when you see the National Science Foundation had a part in this too. (see: http://www.educause.edu/about/mission-and-organization/history/educom-history) A more complete history, as well as the Cause part of the organization:

 http://www.educause.edu/about/mission-and-organization/roots-educause 

For the international ties, especially where ‘benchmarking’ is concerned:

http://www.educause.edu/about/mission-and-organization/international-engagement

Well, no matter if it’s higher learning or not, it appears as long as Gates bankrolls, Educause will keep churning away. Please, continue to fight the E-rate legislation, the Common Core battle in your state, the data mining network, the college/career readiness!

 

 

Tech Thursday: Workforce Commissions, Education, and Common Core

Now you know, CCSS is most decidedly post high school.
Now you know, CCSS is most decidedly post high school.

Thank you for joining me last night as I went in-depth on the topic of a CCSS aligned work force. It is my hope you were able to glean helpful information to aid your battle in your state. ‘Women on the Wall’ archives each call, so if you missed anything, you can access it from their website.

NC, Bound for “Workforce Destiny”:

Commission on Workforce Development Strategic Plan 2014-16 I’m leading off my post for today with my state’s Report for how it is planning on carrying out Workforce training. Yes, involved in the thick of it, is Common Core, Career Pathways, and lots of other connecting ties. In this report, you’ll learn the name of the Commission which makes the Workforce related decisions THEN advises the General Assembly and our Governor. You’ll discover their ‘master plan’ which includes data mining.

You’ll get to see which groups at state level are partnering to align NC. Those involved according to this report? The Dept. of Administration(NC DOA), the Dept. of Commerce(NC DOC), the North Carolina Community College System, the North Carolina Dept. of Health and Human Services(NC DHHS), and finally, the North Carolina Dept. of Public Instruction.

What’s interesting is that the NC Dept. of Public Instruction is under the authority of the General Assembly which is contained in our Legislative Branch. Contrast that with those private schools, and homeschools which are under the guidance of the Dept. of Non Public Instruction(NC DNPE), which is in the Dept. of Administration. Community colleges, public colleges and universities are also housed in the Dept. of Administration. What about the Dept. of Commerce? It too, is in the Dept. of Administration. As far as the proprietary post secondary schools(for profit schools such as Nascar Tech, DeVry, etc.? They are housed with the NC Community College System(NCCCS). Charter schools depending on their status us ‘public’ or ‘private’ would be respectively, NC DPI and NC DNPE.

Note where Career Education is housed. The NC DPI (Dept. of Public Instruction). Which answers to the NC General Assembly, in the Legislative Branch.
Note where Career and Technical Education is housed. The NC DPI (Dept. of Public Instruction). Which answers to the NC General Assembly, in the Legislative Branch.

According to the Report from our Workforce Commission, lots and lots of money from the federal level and the state level has been poured into aligning. (see page 4 of the Report).

Monies featured cover things like:

  • career tech education (DPI) $430,661,949.00;
  • Post Secondary Career Tech/Vocational Ed (NCCCS), $372,928,057.00;
  • Basic Skills (NCCCS), $89,175,304.00;
  • Workforce Investment Act (NC DOC), $79,691,240.00;
  • Wagner Peyser (NC DOC), $19836,199.00 {Note: Wagner Peyser Act was from 1933 and address workforce, the 2014 Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act not only keeps this Act going, but amends it.}
  • Apprenticeships (which are a ‘new’ hot item for aligning workforces) will also be receiving big bucks and are in the NC DOC, $1,604,447.00;
  • Workforce alignment money is also under the Displaced Homemakers, $289,670.00;
  • the American Indian Workforce Development Program, $247,991.00 (both in the NC DOA);
  • Veterans (NC DOC), $5,446,000.00
  • Customized Training (NC DOC), $23,587,840.00

So, why would I share all these figures? Simply put, they all involve post secondary instruction. Instruction that will be provided by vocational schools, community colleges, vocational schools, proprietary schools, colleges, and universities.

So where’s the ‘Common Core’?

Excellent question. In my opinion, because CCSS is such a toxic brand name, we’ve seen how companies, states, and others have rushed to re-brand it. However, in most of the items I’ve seen connected to the Workforce legislation, your key words are NOT ‘Common Core’, BUT Career Pathways or Career Clusters. It’s assumed you, the citizen, wouldn’t know the difference, nor would you be interested. How wrong those powers that be are! One of the guiding principles for NC’s Workforce Commission is:

“The workforce system will focus on target industries and career clusters.”

Goal #1: Streamlining must occur!

“The commission recognizes that North Carolina’s public workforce development system is a key part of the state’s economy. It is comprised of a variety of programs with a broad range of activities that serve a diverse group of people. It includes a group of interactive and interdependent entities, programs, and services. Activities range from self-service activities online, to staff assisted services in a workforce office, to multi-year training programs at a public school or community college. In addition, programs serve people with varying levels of education, employment experience, and barriers. Individuals may participate in a single program or activity or may be eligible to receive services through a variety of programs and entities. The system exists to help businesses find qualified workers to meet their present and future workforce needs and to help individuals gain the skills and training they need to obtain and maintain employment.” How  is all this to be accomplished?

 ‘Align partner services and strategies.
 Develop a common brand to be used across workforce programs that is recognizable to all customers.
 Increase awareness of and accessibility to workforce services.
 Develop shared marketing strategies that promote the talent in North Carolina.’

Goal #2: More of Goal #1, but leading up to Goal #3. Basically we MUST have economic (the Great Recession of 2007) prowess again. Workforce will get us there.

Goal #3: Education, our Way, Not Yours:

How it will be done:

 ‘Strengthen career development services and ensure consistency across programs.
 Enhance programs and enrollment in critical career clusters by targeting resources.
 Strategically coordinate programs among workforce partners to develop skill and education pathways.
 Become a national leader in providing structured work-based learning.’

Also included was more about the desperate need to streamline (Goal #1), to be relevant (part of Goal #2) and

‘it is essential for the state’s workforce programs to target its limited resources to careers in high-growth and emerging industries. Providing consistent information to individuals and strong programs in critical career clusters will not only help individuals find good-paying jobs, but it will also help businesses find the talent they need to growth their business.
One of the best ways to help individuals gain skills and learn more about a career is through work-based learning. These programs combine classroom education with on-the-job experience and individuals gains valuable work experience while learning new skills.
The commission recognizes the need for consistent information, a focus on high-growth and emerging industries, work-based learning opportunities, and it supports policies that shift our culture to one that embraces life-long learning.’

Goal #4: Data, You Got It, We Mine It:

This is the last of the 4 goals the NC Workforce Commission published. By far the most compromising..at least for the students who end up in the Workforce. The Report shares with you, the reader, that it used to the U.S. Department of Labor was the only one receiving Workforce data. But, as we know, that’s about to change. The U.S. WIOA 2014 (the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act of 2014), as I’ve written about will take the U.S. Dept. of Ed’s Student Longitudinal Data System and merge with it. In some states it’s already happening. In others states, it’s just taking off, and in some states, it hasn’t begun yet. Workforce will be in all 50 states.  So, if you state didn’t adopt CCSS, you’ll get in via Career Pathways or those Career Clusters.

Here’s the plan for pulling this off:
 ‘Develop a consistent and coordinated approach of identifying critical career clusters that workforce system partners will use to target resources to meet the needs of the economy.
Gather, evaluate, and utilize information on the usage and quality of services.
Measure and report on the effectiveness of the workforce development system.’

Justification for all this data? Accountability. Being accountable means rigorous measuring. Because if we can’t measure rigorously, how will we know that the Workforce is going to fit the agenda?

The last paragraph or two details how it’s the Commission who will plot, plan, and begin the chain of implementation in NC. They have the Governor’s ear. They have the General Assembly’s attention. It also involves Common Core.

So What About Your State?

Find out what the name of your Workforce Commission is. Find out who serves on it.

Discover their plan by finding their report. Do they answer directly to a particular branch of government or person?

Is there any voter say in the matter or is all this assigned? We, here in NC, get told what is up, there isn’t a vote about it.

Has your state gotten their WDQI ( Workforce Data Quality Initiative) grant money to ‘align and mine’? (see my earlier posts about the WDQI)

If you need a refresher on HOW Career Clusters and/or Career Pathways are Common Core Standards for Adults, here are some links:
From Achieve, Inc. 2012, http://www.achieve.org/files/CCSS-CTE-BridgingtheDivide.pdf (look at page 22 and beyond)

From CTE (Career Tech Education), where you’ll find the “Career Clusters” as well as the page that links CCSS to Career Clusters:
http://www.careertech.org/common-core-state-standards For the Clusters: http://www.careertech.org/career-clusters

WorkKeys (which is job profiling, CCSS aligned and is part of ACT, Inc. which is part of College Board) My fellow anti CCSS warrior’s blog article about the alignment of WorkKeys/CCSS: http://ladyliberty1885.com/2014/06/23/common-core-aligned-workkeys/

Career Pathways, those Dept. of Labor programs that will force the alignment of education and workforce, my post from 10/02/14: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/02/tech-thursday-ccss-career-pathways-and-workforce/

From the U.S. Dept. of Ed, Career Pathways Aligning to CCSS 101: http://ctecenter.ed.gov/training_center/training/pathway-curricular-design-and-instructional-practice

Finally, remember, each Thursday, since I began my blog, there has been an article each week about CCSS post high school. I’ve got a brand new report to share next week that will undeniable confirm what some still deny…that CCSS isn’t post high school!

Tech Thursday: Blast from our “Workforce” Past

A Common Core aligned Workforce's closet is full of these skeletons: Manpower,Jobs Corps, CETA, Workforce for Year 2000, School-to-Work, Goals 2000.
A Common Core aligned Workforce closet is full of these skeletons:
Manpower, Jobs Corps, CETA, Workforce for Year 2000, School-to-Work, Goals 2000 and WIOA 2014.

Each Thursday, since I began my blog, I’ve devoted Thursdays to the lesser talked about post secondary Common Core aligned schools, curricula, etc. Just recently, a question from CT along the lines of when did the Dept. of Ed. and the Dept. of Labor really join forces to do all this, was asked of me. Excellent question. I’ve been burning many hours trying to find the information.  From the incredibly researched Charlotte Iserbyt, the answer, start looking around “Goals 2000”. Her advice was to begin there. As usual, with the government, there’s more than one skeleton in the closet..Especially when that closet is connected to CCSS.

Let Me Tell You a Story:

In searching, I was ‘silly’ enough to think if I typed in the 2 U.S. level Departments, I’d get an instant result that would be worth cheering over. But alas, it wasn’t to be. If you do an internet search with only those 2 names, you’ll get results that are more than likely suitable for filling an encyclopedia, not open a good ‘mystery’ novel.  So, taking one Department at a time, we’ll be introduced to each skeleton in this story.

U.S. Department of Labor’s website revealed, this big skeleton:

Begun in 1913, it turned 100 back in 2013. It’s motto:  “To foster, promote, develop the welfare of wage earners, job seekers and retirees of the US; improve working conditions; advance opportunities for profitable employment and assure work-related benefits and rights.” From what I could glean from their historical timeline, the Dept. pretty much stayed out of the U.S. educational system until 1958, when a policy group began to address the concern of an adequate supply of trained workers for the future skills that would be needed (possibly) by 1978. From there, in 1962, the “Manpower Act” was established. It was to develop and train the unemployed. There was also research into training workers. Then 1969, “Jobs Corps” was moved from one government office to the Dept. of Labor. Both the 1962 and 1969 actions were part of the “Great Society” and “War on Poverty” that President Johnson was promoting. Some of Pres. Johnson’s other programs: “Neighborhood Youth Corps”, “Special Impact”, and “New Careers” programs.

In 1973, CETA (the “Comprehensive Employment and Training Act”) replaced the “Manpower Act”. President Carter revamps CETA in 1977 into “Jobs Corps” (not to be confused with the earlier program). In 1978, a “Private Sector Initiatives Program” began. It’s purpose? To have the most disadvantaged be trained for jobs by private companies. Then, fast forward to 1983, CETA gets replaced by JTPA (the “Job Training and Partnership Act”). This moved workforce training from a national level to state controlled one. During 1985-87, “Work Force for Year 2000 Project” began and co-operated with “Project Literacy US” to meet future skill needs.

In 1990 the “Secretary’s Commission of Achieving Necessary Skills” was appointed. This group, whose work was completed by 1992 found that competencies needed were a)effectively be able to use resources, b)  interpersonal skills, c) information, d) systems and technology. Enter 1993, the (then) Secretary of Labor begins to really hone in on building skills for the workers. By 1994, when the ” School-to-Work Opportunity Act” rolled out, it was to ease the transition for many in high school to go to work. Followed by “Goals 2000”, which established national skill standards to certify workers. States were given money to establish ‘one-stop job centers’. Since then, from 1997-2001, Sec. Perez oversaw the reorganization of the “Workforce Investment Act”. 1998, due to the WIA, means were created for businesses to participate in workforce training and career pathways. It also replaced the JTPA of 1982 as well as gave funding to communities via local, state, and federal resources.

From there, workforce/education mixing is involved in the 2010 release of the “Affordable Healthcare Act” with Title Four. Most recently, the revamped “Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act” ties Common Core to Workforce via the “Career Pathways” in, at least 21 ways (which I detailed on Prevent Common Core’s website in my article, “Common Core and the Workforce”).

Added note: For a fascinating objective review of some the above mentioned government workforce programs, http://www.cato.org/pubs/pas/pa077.html

Dept. of Education, the next big skeleton:

Directly from their website’s historical page: ‘Beginning in the 1950s, political and social changes resulted in expanded federal funding for education. The successful launch of the Soviet Union’s Sputnik in 1957 spurred nationwide concern that led to increased aid for science education programs. The 1960s saw even more expansion of federal education funding: President Lyndon Johnson’s “War on Poverty” called for the creation of many programs to improve education for poor students at all levels—early childhood through postsecondary. This expansion continued in the 1970s with national efforts to help racial minorities, women, people with disabilities and non-English speaking students gain equal access to education. In October 1979, Congress passed the Department of Education Organization Act (Public Law 96-88). Created by combining offices from several federal agencies, the Department began operations in May 1980.’ (source: http://www2.ed.gov/about/overview/focus/what_pg2.html) Page 3 of their history lays out their 4 main goals, 1) all things financial aid, 2) data mining, 3) identifies major problems and nationally addresses them, 4) ensures everyone behaves in schools. {if you want a more serious look at what the DOE does, be sure to access their website}.

What about the “Goals 2000” Mrs. Iserbyt talked about?

Ahh, my fellow anti CCSS readers, you’ll love this skelton. G2 established a national framework that identified world-class academic standards, upped the assessments factor, all while giving students all the tools they needed to meet the 8 goals (see the six above and add on these 2: a) teachers development and b) parent participation).

It was here, with G2, we got the every child will begin school at a certain performance level; that nationwide graduation rates would be 90% or as close to it as possible; that mandatory assessments at certain grade levels must occur. Focused on was the competency of math, English, science, and foreign languages. Civics, government, economics, art, history, and geography must also ‘measure up’. All to ensure that all students, every school be a responsible member of society, be productive and most of all, contribute to the economy.

It was with G2, we were told we’d be #1 globally by doing all this, especially in math and science; that our illiterate adults would be able to overcome that, possess knowledge and skills to compete in the 21st century. It was here, we were told our teachers would become a force and that every school would participate with others, especially the parents. It was, in fact, the creation of the National Education Standards and Improvement Council that the standards began their journey to become national, in more ways than had ever been seen before.

It was G2 that also created the National Skill Standards Board to develop rigorous occupational education grouped into clusters, thus creating a system of unified instruction, assessing, and certifying. In short, ‘Goals 2000’  was ‘all encompassing’ in paving the way for where we are now in our current fight.

There is more about the U.S. Dept. of Education’s role in Career Pathways, Common Technical Education Core, and the like, by accessing my previous Tech Thursday posts. (if you are new to my blog, please feel free to start there or to read this and then go back) However,  let’s move on, I’ve got a surprise ending you just have to read!

Money and Data, the ‘biggest, baddest’ skeletons in the closet:

The reason I’m lumping these two together is, thanks to our federal government, they have so masterfully intertwined these two you’d need a board certified ghost buster to separate them. Thanks to my querying reader, I was able to uncover a bevy of documents detailing when each of the (to date) 29 states involved in this aligned Workforce Career Pathways Training was granted money…and lots of it. For a two fold purpose; this is the ‘surprise’ ending, but before I tell you, do you think you can guess?

Workforce Quality Data Initiative, one of the newest skeletons:

This is being conducted through the U. S. Dept. of Labor, HOWEVER, it’s what the initiative does, who it involves that you’ll want to know about.  The program takes educational data and workforce data and combines them to better align to each other!

All that student longitudinal data? Here’s just one of the places it lands! Look at the 2nd goal the Initiative has:

“Enable workforce data to be matched with education data to ultimately create longitudinal data systems with individual-level information beginning with pre-kindergarten through post-secondary schooling all the way through entry and sustained participation in the workforce and employment services system.”

While there is even more to this skeleton, this by itself is huge! Yes, just like Race to the Top, this Initiative involves lots of money that has been handed out in rounds to certain states. As with any government funding, there are strings for those states accepting. By taking the money, they MUST, within the 3 years the grants are good for, begin the database or expand their existing ones.

Where I live, Where You Live:

As you may know by now, I live in North Carolina. NC was in the group of states awarded grant money via Round 3 of the WQDI, in 2013. We got $1, 156,348 to ‘align and mine’. Round 1 states, got their money in 2010, Round 2 states, 2012. Round 4 states were awarded their money this past June (2014). There are states yet to be awarded, but, don’t be surprised if and when they do.

Here’s the press release that accompanied NC’s award (as see on the DOL’s website):

“The U.S. Department of Labor today announced the availability of approximately $6 million in grants for the third round of the Workforce Data Quality Initiative. These funds will enable up to six additional states to build or expand longitudinal databases that link workforce and education data, enabling them to improve the performance of workforce programs. “These grants will provide access to high quality data, which will help improve how the workforce system serves those who need assistance most,” said Jane Oates, assistant secretary of labor for employment and training. “Better data means better guidance for consumers, practitioners and policymakers. Better guidance means stronger workforce programs and a stronger U.S. workforce.” Grantees will be expected to use these longitudinal databases to conduct research and analysis aimed at determining the effectiveness of workforce and education programs, and to develop tools to inform customers of the publicly funded workforce system. This grant opportunity stems from the Obama administration’s focus on access to high-quality data and is related to the U.S. Department of Education’s Statewide Longitudinal Data Systems grants to build longitudinal education databases. Grantees will be expected to achieve multiple goals during the three-year grant period. These include developing or improving state workforce longitudinal data systems with individual-level information, enabling workforce data to be matched with education data to create longitudinal data systems, improving the quality and breadth of data in the workforce data systems, using longitudinal data to provide useful information about program operations, analyzing the performance of education and employment training programs, and providing user-friendly information to help consumers select the training and education programs that best suit their needs.”

One lone sentence to add to the above from the 2014’s Round 4 press release tells of a larger looming agenda item, “expand longitudinal databases that link workforce and education data and help these states to better understand how education and workforce development programs complement each other.” As I have shared with you before it is illegal for national database of this magnitude to exist..however, if the states build them one, by one and then join them..that’s a whole different scenario, right? The government would like for us to believe that.

*NOTE: In the event you are not aware of the 3 federal laws that prohibit this: The HEOA (Higher Education Opportunity Act of 2008, The NCLB(No Child Left Behind) legislation amending the ESEA’s (Elementary and Secondary Education Act’s)  ERSC (Education Reform Sciences Act) 2002, and the IDEA (Individuals with Disabilities Act).

Click to enlarge to see which round your state receive 'align and mine' money. IF you do not see a color on your state, you've not been awarded money yet.
Click to enlarge to see which round your state received ‘align and mine’ money. IF you do not see a color on your state, you’ve not been awarded money yet.

The end?

No, it appears this saga is far from over, but for now, we’ll open the closet and let the skeletons rot in peace.

Monday Musings: If I Were on a Repeal Common Core Committee

Hey, I would be a great team member!
Hey, I would be a great team member!

If you’ve been following the news in NC, you are aware we have a “Review Committee” currently studying the Common Core Standards. IF you’ve not been following the NC events, you should..opportunities to hold those in charge accountable for ridding us of the CCSS are abundant.

Quick review:

First up, the way in which NC received Common Core, was, without a single legislative voice. Then, when enough stink was raised, those in charge, got very busy, created legislation and held hearings. Only 1, on March 20, 2014, had opportunities for NC citizens to speak in support of the Standards OR speak out against the Standards. Of the 60 speakers, I was the first one to say “I’m against the Common Core Standards“. Happily, that day, there were more of us AGAINST the CCSS than supporting them.

Hopeful, I even publicly stated that those in charge seeking knowledge, advice, or research could seriously consider someone like me! After all, I’ve been following the push for nationalized standards in America since 2009. I have a ‘few’ files I could share, folks.  But..as the media will tell us a committee was, indeed formed. How it was formed is an embarrassment to the taxpayers and an affront to our legal system.

How so? The law signed stated exactly who was to be on the Repeal (not Review) committee. The members were to be a mix of not only professional educators BUT early childhood experts AND parents AND concerned citizens (only educators are on the committee). It also stated deadlines (totally blown off), meeting locations (not to include the DPI, but yet, oddly enough, the first meeting was held in a tiny room of the DPI). The DPI wasn’t to be involved for transparency, accountability, and frankly, protective reasons. Yet, they are doing their best to bully the system and have their way. The reason a cross section of the population was to be assigned was to have as much objectivity as possible. I invite you to go look up each of the members and find out how many are CCSS disciples. What a sham for our students.

Now, if only they’d taken me up on my offer:

You might be reading this and thinking I’m bitter..hardly, while largely disappointed I didn’t get chosen to serve on the Repeal Committee, I have been better able to be a watchdog, to continue my researching into all the cracks, crevices, and wormholes the CCSS machine has insured it’s in here in NC. I’ve also been able to help folks nationwide. I’ve been saved from the ‘stacked deck’ mentality; spared the fits of unkind words, no lady should utter.

I am not pleasantly surprised by the unfairness it appears is happening. I’m most troubled that once again, while this state has the tremendous opportunity to rid itself of ALL that CCSS entails, money is speaking louder than NC’s people.

“Had your chance, muffed it.”

This quote is from “Chitty Chitty, Bang Bang”, a movie I’ve seen many times and a quote I’ve used repeatedly. Dick Van Dyke was seeking the attention of a wealthy business owner. The wealthy man, being very impatient, gave Mr. Van Dyke only seconds to state his case. When it didn’t happen the way the business man wanted or in the time frame he set out, he uttered the words, “Had your chance, muffed it. Good day, sir.”  So, to those who chose the committee, here’s what you muffed:

a) Citizens, non educator professionals who are qualified, concerned, and very involved in this present state of educational chaos.

b) Researchers who don’t get lobbyist money, corporation funding, or are otherwise impeded in what they discover so their objectivity is absolute.

c) Everyday people who can make a difference and rid the state of NC of this illegal, ill written, insidious mess. Folks who could, would, and have pledged to help right the wrongs public private partnership created CCSS brought us.

d) The transparency factor, the accountability is very suspect when you chose to disrespect the law. How can we citizens trust you when you act like a spoiled child?

e) Your opportunity to cut the crap by cutting the purse strings. Education is NOT a business to be bought, use ‘best practices’, unite to Washington, D.C. agendas. Education is more than this.  Students should NEVER, ever be referred to as ‘talent supply’, ‘human capital’, part of a ‘pipeline’ or any other of those sold out, educratic terms you share.

f) The relationship you could of formed with me. You missed out on my humor, charm, personality, knowledge, networking capability, teamwork ability, loyalty, dedication, five years worth of research, fact finding skills, fearlessness. I, along with my well connected anti CC friends/warriors could show you things about the CC Standards you’d have to see to believe, but..guess you’ll  miss that too.

Everything has a time, a purpose:

Well, we all have a job to do, paid to do it or not. You will continue on in your work, and I, in mine. Remember, I, along with my thousands of buddies, will be watching what transpires with NC and CC.  Should you need me, or someone just as up to date on CCSS as possible, I’m not hard to find. I am willing to give our students the best education possible. One that’s agenda free, legal, honoring, true, and right.

It’s time to finish what was started and ‘kill the Core’.    common-core-NC-house-060414

Let’s not muff the opportunity to have education free of all the CC Machine (CCSS, STEM, AP, STEaM, Hire Standards, College, Career Tech CC, Community Colleges, IB Schools, UN Global Schools, Race to the Top, Smarter Balance Assessments, Gates, Pearson Publishing, data mining and every other connected group). Let’s show the nation how tough NC can be and say “ENOUGH!” “No more Core!”

Fib-o-meter Friday: History of CCS

fibmaster

Okay, it’s Friday again, which means it’s time to break out the “Fib-o-meter”!! This week’s list of statements for you to rate and/or use when helping others learn more about Common Core is below. Like last week, after reading each ‘fact’ or ‘fib’, plot in on the Meter in the place you think it belongs! When you’re through (and only then) scroll down to the answers and see how you did!! Good luck.

Be sure you use these facts/fibs in your circles of influence to help spread the word why CCS needs to go!

1) Common Core Standards is the zenith of education reform.

2) The federal government began holding states more accountable in education results in the 1980s.

3) Common Core Standards main goal is a quality based education.

4) One argument the pro CC side uses is ‘throwing away money & wasting time’.

5) Common Core allows teachers the freedom to teach their disciplined area of expertise.

6) The CC Standards themselves do not amass data on students, Race to the Top funding amasses it.

7) HR5 (The Student Success Act) is currently stalled in Washington & is key to reforming much of the CCS.

8) CCS allows total transparency of themselves, resources involved.

9) CCS repeatedly suggests government is more trustworthy than parents.

10) Action steps I can take as a concerned parent or citizen include meeting with others.

Answers:  All of today’s facts/fibs are from the recent Family Research Council webinar from earlier this week. I’ll give you the link at the end of the post. It is well worth sharing.

1) Total fallacy..Common Core Standards are a huge step in the direction of 100% fed led ed, but it’s not the zenith. This is according to Dr. Neal McCluskey with the Cato Institute. He went on to state that he believes the zenith is not far away in the future. My researched guess…STEM will be involved somehow.

2) This is totally true, the federal government, did in fact, back during the 1980s tell the states they would become more and more accountable for education results in their states as the years progressed. CCS is the culmination to some of the years between then and now. The final bell hasn’t rung just yet, in other words.

3) Depending on who is taking today’s challenge, this answer could be ‘neutral’. Some, especially those supportive CCS, will say quality education is definitely a goal. However, for our purposes, total fallacy is much more accurate. Jane Robbins, lawyer and with the American Principles Project, explains in her segment of the webinar, that it is in fact, workforce and human capital are the main goals of CCS.

4) Totally true as far as an argument. It’s so over used, it’s a worn out welcome mat at your front door. The reality is the far better point of  saving money and to create ease for the teachers by discontinuing the CCS. Why? The required professional development for teachers will be perpetually on-going. It will be costly and time consuming. Think a teacher who has no time for her/his personal life…at all.

5) Totally fallacy. This has to do with that storied ‘15%’ wiggle room. The stark reality is there won’t be enough time left after teaching the 85% CCS to wiggle, teach or even think. This is one of the classic strawman fallacies of CCS.

6) Totally true. Jane Robbins explained it well. The massive amounts of data in education can be found in the Race to the Top applications and in the federal stimulus money from a few years back. One of the qualifiers, each state must build the exact data centers as each other. This skirts the federal vs. state led argument.

7) Totally true. Congressman Tom Cotton (very opposed to CCS) shared during his portion of the webinar that this bill is stalled and would, indeed, reform a tremendous amount of the current fed led education disaster. He also encourages us to contact our US Congress men and women, especially the Democratic ones to get behind this and pass it.

8) Total fallacy. No transparency whatsoever, in fact, it’s more like  the White Rabbit in Alice in Wonderland (“I’m Late! I’m Late!”).

9) Yes, it absolutely reinforces this concept. As part of ‘human capital’ you won’t need parents.

10) Yes, yes, and, heck yes!! We must gather in person, on-line. The key is informed and active parents, citizens. We are no match for the CCS machine! Want to know how to get involved? Leave me a message or comment. Contact my dear associate, LadyLiberty1885.

Here’s the link to the webinar. Watch it, take notes & let’s chat. Remember, you can find me on Twitter (@commoncorediva), here, or on Facebook (Lynne M Taylor).

http://frc.org/commoncore (the video should begin to play almost immediately)

 

Will This be ‘Delivery’ or ‘Dine In’?

For this entry under “Would You Believe It Wednesday”, we’re looking at Common Core Standards as if we are considering our evening meal choice…ordering ‘delivery’ or ‘dining in’…

Your Menu:

Just announced yesterday via an email I received, Amplify now offers Common Core Standard aligned lessons, assessments on the go! Yes, as in, on your mobile device. In other words, ‘delivery’. Just ‘order’ what you want to learn & Boom..instant delivery..minus tipping your delivery driver. How fast, how “I can learn anywhere!”, ‘how indoctrinated’.. “Dining in”, of course is the more traditional school setting. But, according to the advertising, we’re  can have our ‘food’ either way. Oh, the price of this ‘delivery learning’…at least $359.00 to get you the first year’s worth of ‘food’ and a handy dandy ‘fork’ to eat it with (a pre-loaded tablet). Then, after that year expires, any other ‘deliveries’ you order are $60.00 annually. Pretty expensive meal, don’t you think? Last note to make, it’s geared more for teachers.

Your Diet:

Not much variety or choices here, all Common Core Standard aligned (see: http://www.amplify.com/curriculum)! It’s all the same thing, every day, delivered in the same manner. If I can ‘learn anywhere’, why can’t I exercise my God-given freedom to choose ‘how I learn everyday’? Millions of teachers & students accomplish this now and are blossoming. The difference? They are not stuck on a bland diet of the same thing, every day for their learning. Yes, I’m oversimplifying this, but its to make a basic point. There are so many different, exciting, and proven successful ways to learn, we shouldn’t be restricting ourselves to one way. That’s like telling your child, “I’m sorry, honey, but from now on Mom’s only serving spaghetti for every meal and you have no other choice, I’ve already bought all the ingredients.” Now, if your child is like mine, for a couple of days, the concept of spaghetti all the time sounds fun, or at least intriguing. But, think ahead, what happens in a couple of weeks? In a month? They won’t only be dreading the concept, they’ll more than likely be seeking invitations to a friend’s house for meals. We won’t even discuss what happens if my child is allergic to what the spaghetti’s made of.

Since Amplify is geared toward teachers, look at how much control is in the teachers hands. (http://www.amplify.com/tablet/mdm) Now, do not misunderstand me, I know teachers have a lot keep up with. However, I do not think this much management, access, etc. is the way to go. Especially when you factor in all the others who have access to the same information or God forbid, data breaches.

Your Restaurant Owner:

As far as the ‘restaurant’..Amplify Company. Let’s take a look at them, after all, if I’m going to be on their delivery list, I need to know who’s cooking the meal I’m about to ingest. Amplify is an independent portion of News Corporation. (Think a chain restaurant, one head office, many independent branches). As far as the owner, News Corporation is a global mass media company founded by Rupert Murdock. (see the companies News Corporation owns, http://newscorp.com/about/our-businesses/) News Corporation states is has, through it’s philanthropy, impacted over 55,000 students world-wide. Through Amplify, the company supports STEM and other 21st Century education initiatives. Diane Ravitch’s shared on her blog, Murdock won a hefty contract in relationship with Common Core & Amplify (see: http://dianeravitch.net/2013/03/17/rupert-murdoch-wins-contract-to-develop-common-core-tests/) Michelle Malkin’s post has another viewpoint about Murdock & Common Core (see: http://www.nationalreview.com/articles/343040/common-core-trojan-horse-michelle-malkin)

Check, please:

No article about Common Core would be complete without assessments. Amplify has you more than covered there. (See: http://www.amplify.com/assessment) Before I sign off for today, let’s review: Amplify is being sold to teachers, parents, and students with the following catch phrases, “ease of implementation”; ‘easy and affordable’; “vetted content”, ‘tech support’; “active learning”. It’s owned and operated by a well identified Common Core Supporter with access to data on a world wide basis. As we’ve discovered in other data related Common Core stories around the nation, education data mining is one of the hottest businesses on the market. 

Being the savvy consumers we are, we now know, this menu, dietary selection, and restaurant owner do NOT satisfy our discerning taste buds.

commentcard