Tag Archives: CCSS/CTE Machine

Tech Thursday: High School Equivalency, CCSS/CTE Style

The GED's (General Educational Development) makeover isn't new news, but what HAS been happening with it since the news broke?
The GED’s (General Educational Development) makeover isn’t new news, but what HAS been happening with it since the news broke?

No, the GED’s makeover ISN’T the biggest news at the moment in the War Against the Core. However, as we’ve seen in this fight to save our educational system from the massive agenda which accompanies it, WHAT has been going on SINCE the GED Makeover??

If your state is anything like the one I live in (NC), plenty. If you refer to the picture at the beginning of this post, you’ll not one, but 3 testing services now offer the NC HSET (North Carolina High School Equivalency Test). Your diploma will be awarded to you by the NC Community College System. The NC Community College System has ‘sold out’ to the Common Core Standards/Career Tech Education.

Before we look at the 2015 update, step back with me to gain a better context of HOW CTE and Common Core are related:

From 2014:

How do I know the NC Community College System has aligned itself to the CCSS Machine? Please refer to my  former article exposing the alignment:
Here’s an excerpt from the “Despicable Moves” article, “all 58 of NC’s Community Colleges are in tune with the businesses in our state. The “master plan”? Kindergarten-12th grades, as well as community colleges (those 4 yr colleges will be added soon, or so it is hoped) to have classroom lessons in tune with the jobs in manufacturing , finances, logistics and healthcare.” (the entire article:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/09/tech-thursday-ncs-workforce-despicable-moves/ )

How do I know the rest of America’s Community Colleges are also aligned? Here’s an excerpt, “‘THE’ College Board involved with local community colleges. I hope this, because, it should continue to illuminate just how big of a grip on upper level education the group has. One part of the College Board’s organization is known as the Office of Community Colleges…. It is their job to work with local community colleges & help guide their decision making among other goals. The Board for the OCCI has many members. At least 2 are vocal about their support of & promotion the CC Standards in community colleges.  Kenneth Ender, Chair of the Advisory Board, “There is considerable work to be done to assure our K–12 curricula align with that of community college higher education. Our goal should be nothing less than assuring every high school graduate is prepared for postsecondary training and/or postsecondary education. The economy and workplace of the 21st century demands nothing less.” Nancy MacCallin, “If we do not address alignment of our K–12 and higher education systems, we will not be competitive in the global economy. Remediation needs of postsecondary students continue to worsen and need to be addressed in order to increase educational attainment. I hope to align assessment with the common core to provide an authentic assessment to ensure students move quickly through the remediation sequence and into a program that leads to a skilled workforce.”  (see the rest of the article: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/09/18/tech-thursday-common-core-community-college/)

 
Step Back, Circa 2012:

Before NC could become so aligned in all that’s related to the Common Core, there had to be some states to be the ‘guinea pigs’ for post-secondary Career Tech Education. From 2012 (or close to it), this is what was happening, “Since CTE is a federal level national initiative, there will be all kinds of funding, programs, etc. To get us to this point in education reform, research had to be conducted. From what I’ve been able to find, there were 5 states of OR, CO,KS, MN, MA, were awarded funding to participate in Advancing Career and Technical Education (CTE) in State and Local Career Pathways Systems, a two-year project managed by Jobs for the Future through a contract with OVAE(Office of Vocational Adult Education, which, by the way, has been renamed to OCTAE or the Office of Career, Technical Adult Education). Technical assistance will be provided to assist these states in building their capacity to integrate CTE Programs of Study (POS) into their broader career pathways system development efforts.” (Read the rest of the article: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2014/10/02/tech-thursday-ccss-career-pathways-and-workforce/)

 

Modern Day “Progress”:

Now that you’ve got a bit of context as to HOW the post-secondary CTE and the K-12 CCSS are related (if you need more evidence, I’ve got plenty, just let me know), let’s look at the current ‘progress’ via the High School Equivalency Test (aka the GED) from North Carolina. NC has 3 options, some states only have one or two options for measuring high school equivalency.

ETS’s HiSET: (Educational Testing Service), is a well known pro CCSS assessment maker, educational research entity and student data miner. According to their website for the HiSet, by offering you MORE options than every before for high school equivalency testing, you have greater opportunities! (see their encouragement letter to potential test takers,
http://hiset.ets.org/test_takers/letter/)

The ultimate goal in the equivalency test.
The ultimate goal in the equivalency test.

Other States using the HiSet are California(specific locations), Iowa, Louisiana, Maine, Massachusetts, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, Tennessee, and, Wyoming. (see: http://hiset.ets.org/requirements) The U.S. Territories are also in the CCSS/CTE ‘mix’. Click on the U.S. Territories tab to see their requirements.
To see the 2015 HiSet’s “Test at a Glance” pdf: 2015_taag

“GED”: Since GED is now a registered trademark owned by the American Council on Education (see this from their legal page, “The trademarks and logos used on our site identify our products and services and are owned by the GED Testing Service LLC or are used under license by GED Testing Service LLC. GED® and GED Testing Service® are registered trademarks of the American Council on Education (“ACE”)), much about the assessment has changed. For example, the main ‘selling point” as per their website can been seen below.

gedhype

The North Carolina Community College page shares that the “GED” is available in all 58 locations. Be sure to refer back to the fact that all 58 locations are tied to the CCSS Machine. (see above). Unlike the HiSet, “GED” is an anywhere, anytime assessment. See:
https://ged.com/how-it-works

Get all the alignment details: http://www.gedtestingservice.com/educators/ccr
Get all the alignment details: http://www.gedtestingservice.com/educators/ccr

The TASC (“Test Assessing Secondary Completion”):

This particular assessment is tied into MacGraw Hill’s CTB arm of assessments as well as the Data Recognition Corporation (DRC). See the links for much more information,
http://www.tasctest.com/about-ctb-for-educators.html
http://www.datarecognitioncorp.com/Pages/News%20Articles/news-3.aspx

Proof of the association can be seen in this screen shot:
tascbackers

TASC’s position on “Common Core” can be found in this excerpt, “TASC Test Item Types Reflect College and Career Readiness. Field tested and normed in 2013, the TASC test delivers the newest high school equivalency content available. It is aligned to Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education (OCTAE) National College and Career Standards for Adult Education, Next Generation Science Standards, and Social Studies national frameworks.

Wait, I didn’t see “Common Core State Standards” in that excerpt. You’re exactly right. Here’s HOW the CCR(College/Career Readiness) and the CCSS (Common Core State Standards) are basically the same thing, “In April 2013, after the TASC test development was initiated, the Office of Vocational and Adult Education (now named the Office of Career, Technical, and Adult Education) completed a project identifying a subset of the Common Core State Standards most appropriate for adult preparation for college and/or careers and issued its report, “College and Career Readiness Standards for Adult Education.”  You can access the rest of the document from which the above excerpt was taken when you click on the provided link. It’s an alignment timeline plan from McGraw Hill’s CTB Plan. TASC_Test Transition Plan_Revised_May.11.2015

The NC Memo from the US Dept. of Education which connects the high school equivalency tests to FASFA (post-secondary financial aid) forms can be found at
 http://www.nccommunitycolleges.edu/sites/default/files/numbered-memos/cc15-001.pdf

How does that memo tie to the CCSS Machine? The makeover of the FASFA for one, the U.S. Dept. of Education is another, the NC Community College is next.

Not shown in the memo or any of the above is the NC Chamber of Commerce’s involvement in education, but it’s there for sure. It has to be. Why? Simply put, the NC Workforce combines education and businesses.
In Your State:

As you know I use NC as an example for you to see where in your state these CCSS/CTE/CRR ties are. However, here are some articles I have previously published which tie the national organization for Community Colleges, as well as others,  to all this aligned agenda. Please,  use these, share these! The re-authorization of the HEA (Higher Education Act) will be upon us very, very soon! It is meant to be the second part of the re-authorization for education in America. It will directly follow up the re-authorized results of the K-12 education (Every Child Achieves Act/Student Success Act). Why? You cannot have complete education alignment that’s been stated as ‘cradle to career’ without our K-college system being distorted.

Every one of the links below is written from the national level of involvement, not just NC’s.

This ties so many ends of the CCSS Machine/Initiative together: https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/25/sic-em-saturday-using-community-colleges-for-more-core/

This one features some of the current proposed legislative moves in Washington, D.C.:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/07/10/may-day-may-day-ccsscte-urgent-news/

This one shows how the high school assessments (GED, SAT, and, others) are being used against us:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/06/12/fom-post-secondary-ed-the-ccss-trojan/

My two part “Upskilling” articles pack a ‘one, two punch’:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/05/06/wybi-upskilling-america-part-1/
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/05/07/tech-thursday-upskilling-america-part-2/

The Council for Higher Education (CHEA) and the CCSS Machine:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/14/ftf-chea-cte-ccss-and-america/

 


A Parting Thought:

Anti CCSS/CTE Warriors, please note post-secondary education, no matter if it’s community colleges, for profit trade schools, on-line classes or certifications, public or private 4 year schools, every student who enters into them comes from a different educational choice. No education choice will be saved from the CCSS/CCR/CTE agenda as long as the illegally based initiative is allowed to survive. 

 

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Tech Thursday: Hunting for CCSS/CTE

Hunt Institute has a long history of being Common Core supportive.

Hunt Institute has a long history of being Common Core supportive.

While it appears all anti CCSS eyes are on the HR5 (the re-authorization of the NCLB), it’s been proven via documents that the HEA re-authorization is just as CCSS tied! Both have been re-authorized in almost the same time periods since their original passing in 1965. Time and time again, Sen. Lamar Alexander has been tied to the re-writing of BOTH bills. The intent? Simply put: what gets started in HR5 for CCSS, CTE, data mining, control,assessments, and educational abuse is CONTINUED into the HEA.

So what does the Hunt Institute’s announcement of 6/16/15 have to do with this? The announcement HI released, details a report published by the SREB (Southern Regional Education Board), which gives us an overview of the BRIDGE between K-12 and post-secondary..This plays right into the hands of BOTH bills being up for re-authorization. We MUST act quickly in alerting our legislators to KILL BOTH bills!! This ‘bridge’ even has a name…and I’ve taken you in great detail into the creation of that bridge. It’s called “Career Pathways”.

 

The Hunt Institute Announcement:

Here’s an excerpt from the HI’s website about SREB, “Labor market economists project that by 2020, two-thirds or more of all jobs will require some post-secondary education — either a certificate, a credential or a degree at the associate level or higher. At present, however, the Southern Regional Education Board’s (SREB) analyses of educational attainment data suggest that millions of young Americans are being left behind in the transition from high school to college and well-paying jobs. Significant numbers will never graduate, and many who do go on to college will never complete a credential with value in the marketplace. Credentials for All: An Imperative for SREB States, the final report of SREB’s Commission on Career and Technical Education, offers a powerful solution to this problem: Provide more than one pathway to college and careers.”

A Hunt Institute ‘Bridge’ of Their Own:

While busy promoting the SREB’s last report in a series of them, HI has produced some of its own ‘bridge’ reports for connecting K-12, post-secondary education, and alignment to the CCSS/CTE way of educating our students (remember, all ages attend post-secondary schools).

While the report I’m about to share is ‘state specific’ it can be used as evidence to research what your state may have going on that is either the same or eerily similar. Remember, the Hunt Institute has been instrumental in promoting CCSS is every state; SREB is busy promoting CCSS/CTE across several states (other regional education boards complete the coverage across the nation). (*Note: I’ve written several articles on SREB and those other regional education boards, you can find them by searching my blog, just insert the acronym for the region you wish to find.)

Hunt Institute’s series, “CoNCepts”, from their latest issue: “This issue of coNCepts examines the ways North Carolina’s K-12 and higher education systems are working together to ensure college and career readiness for all students by aligning K-12 with post-secondary expectations, creating clearly defined pathways for career training and college preparation, and forming robust partnerships with industry.” Further down the page, you’ll see: “ As part of NC Ready for Success, NCDPI has partnered with ACT to administer a series of college readiness assessments: EXPLORE (8th grade); PLAN (10th grade); and ACT (11th grade). Beginning in 2011-2012, PLAN and ACT were administered to all 10th and 11th graders free of charge. These assessments inform students, parents, and educators about the student’s current academic trajectory, as well as where further interventions and support are required.” See the screen shot below of another page from the ‘CoNCept’ issue.

New Schools, Jobs for the Future have been traced to ties with the CCSS Machine; NCCCS (NC Community College System) has been aligned to include CTE/CCSS, as well.
New Schools, Jobs for the Future have been traced to ties with the CCSS Machine; NCCCS (NC Community College System) has been aligned to include CTE/CCSS, as well.

To read the rest of the HI’s CCSS/CTE education reform news: CoNCept-Issue5

 

SREB, Southern Regional Education Board:

One of the last times I researched and wrote about the SREB designs on post-secondary education was another report from the same series as Hunt Institute refers to above. That was back in  April 2015. That report’s name was ““Community Colleges in the South: Strengthening Readiness and Pathways”  The report HI is promoting is titled, “Credentials for All: An Imperative for SREB States”. The new report, like it’s predecessor, has 8 strategy points laid out. I’ll not repeat the former 8 points from the April 2015 article, but I am including the link so you can read it for yourselves. You’ll also be able to see how the Gates Foundation and others are backing the SREB (you can bet the other regional education boards are just as well taken care of by the CCSS Machine). See April’s SREB article:
https://commoncorediva.wordpress.com/2015/04/25/sic-em-saturday-using-community-colleges-for-more-core/

The latest SREB bridge connector from K-12 to post-secondary titled “Credentials for All: An Imperative for SREB States” is more of the same we’ve seen from those seeking to misguide Americans into believing all this CCSS/CTE reform is the best we can do for our students. No, it’s the best the CCSS/CTE Machine can do to undermine our country!  “Credentials” includes a message to the SREB states (and those of us fighting CCSS/CTE) from the Governor of KY. Here’s an excerpt from his message, One of my goals as chair of SREB and its Commission on Career and Technical Education is to promote policies and practices to support strong career pathways that help more students earn industry and post-secondary credentials and obtain good jobs.”

The latest 8 action steps laid out in “Credentials” are as follows:

“1) Build bridges from high school to post-secondary education and the workplace by creating rigorous, relevant career pathways driven by labor market demand.”
2) Expect all students to graduate academically ready for both college and careers.
3)  Select assessments of technical and workplace readiness standards that offer long-term value to individual students, employers and the economy; carry college credits; and are directly linked to more advanced certifications and further study. 
4)  Provide all high school career pathway teachers, especially new teachers from industry, with the professional development and fast-track induction programs they need to meet high academic, technical and pedagogical standards and enhance students’ academic and technical readiness for college and careers.
5) Adopt a framework of strategies to restructure low-performing high schools around rigorous, relevant career pathways that accelerate learning and prepare students for post-secondary credentials and degrees. 
6) Offer early advanced credential programs in shared-time technology centers, aligning their curricula, instruction and technology with home high schools and community and technical colleges.
7)  Incentivize community and technical colleges and school districts to double the percentage of students who earn certificates, credentials and degrees by setting statewide readiness standards and aligning assessment and placement measures with those standards. Other strategies: Use the senior year of high school to reduce the number of students who need remediation, retool developmental education, adopt individualized support strategies for struggling students and improve affordability. 
8) Design accountability systems that recognize and reward districts, high schools, technology centers, and community and technical colleges that double the number of young adults who acquire post-secondary credentials and secure high-skill, high-wage jobs by age 25.”

How these action steps are taken in your states is something you MUST read for yourselves. It includes federal and state pressure via funding. Get the entire report by accessing it here: CredentialPlan

Remember, your state may not be an SREB one, but you can more than likely find the exact message from your regional education board or one extremely like this. Why? Because while all 50 states don’t have CCSS, every one of them, by law has Career Tech (aka Workforce). As I stated in the beginning of this article:

                                                                        What starts in HR5 ends in HEA!